kode adsense disini
Hot Best Seller

Musicophilia: Tales of Music and the Brain

Availability: Ready to download

With the same trademark compassion and erudition he brought to The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat, Oliver Sacks explores the place music occupies in the brain and how it affects the human condition. In Musicophilia, he shows us a variety of what he calls “musical misalignments.” Among them: a man struck by lightning who suddenly desires to become a pianist at the age o With the same trademark compassion and erudition he brought to The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat, Oliver Sacks explores the place music occupies in the brain and how it affects the human condition. In Musicophilia, he shows us a variety of what he calls “musical misalignments.” Among them: a man struck by lightning who suddenly desires to become a pianist at the age of forty-two; an entire group of children with Williams syndrome, who are hypermusical from birth; people with “amusia,” to whom a symphony sounds like the clattering of pots and pans; and a man whose memory spans only seven seconds-for everything but music. Illuminating, inspiring, and utterly unforgettable, Musicophilia is Oliver Sacks’ latest masterpiece.


Compare
kode adsense disini

With the same trademark compassion and erudition he brought to The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat, Oliver Sacks explores the place music occupies in the brain and how it affects the human condition. In Musicophilia, he shows us a variety of what he calls “musical misalignments.” Among them: a man struck by lightning who suddenly desires to become a pianist at the age o With the same trademark compassion and erudition he brought to The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat, Oliver Sacks explores the place music occupies in the brain and how it affects the human condition. In Musicophilia, he shows us a variety of what he calls “musical misalignments.” Among them: a man struck by lightning who suddenly desires to become a pianist at the age of forty-two; an entire group of children with Williams syndrome, who are hypermusical from birth; people with “amusia,” to whom a symphony sounds like the clattering of pots and pans; and a man whose memory spans only seven seconds-for everything but music. Illuminating, inspiring, and utterly unforgettable, Musicophilia is Oliver Sacks’ latest masterpiece.

30 review for Musicophilia: Tales of Music and the Brain

  1. 4 out of 5

    Glenn Sumi

    Have you ever experienced an “ear worm” – i.e., a melody “stuck” in your head? Have you ever found yourself humming or whistling a tune for no reason, then thought back to the lyrics or theme of that song and realized it had something to do with what’s on your mind? Have you ever tried to remember what letter comes after another in the alphabet and found yourself singing that “ABC” song from childhood? Check, check and check. All of these are explored in Musicophilia, a fascinating series of essay Have you ever experienced an “ear worm” – i.e., a melody “stuck” in your head? Have you ever found yourself humming or whistling a tune for no reason, then thought back to the lyrics or theme of that song and realized it had something to do with what’s on your mind? Have you ever tried to remember what letter comes after another in the alphabet and found yourself singing that “ABC” song from childhood? Check, check and check. All of these are explored in Musicophilia, a fascinating series of essays by Dr. Oliver Sacks (Awakenings, The Man Who Mistook His Wife For A Hat). His writing is clear, civilized and genial, if occasionally repetitive and dryly scientific. (A more ruthless editor might have helped.) Drawing from more than half a century of clinical work as a neurologist, Sacks recounts tales of patients whose conditions have something to do with music. Among his subjects are people who: • have musical hallucinations (they constantly hear songs, often Christmas carols or marching tunes) • associate certain notes or musical intervals with colours or pictures • suddenly discover, after an accident or some other incident, that they have an aptitude for music or, conversely, lose their musical abilities There are some absorbing case studies, such as Martin, who was born “normal” but contracted meningitis at three and succumbed to seizures, limiting his intelligence and physical abilities. As an adult, he had a low IQ but remembered 2,000 operas and all of Bach’s cantatas, including melodies and what each instrument and voice played. I was also intrigued by the woman who can remember pages of text, but only when they’re associated with a melody. (Her professor, recognizing his own lecture notes written verbatim on an exam, thought she was cheating until he discovered her gift.) And there are eye-opening tales about composers like Ravel, whose famous Bolero, with its relentless repetition, might have been influenced by his frontotemporal dementia, and Shostakovitch, who refused to have a piece of shrapnel removed from his head because it mysteriously provided him with music which he then incorporated into his compositions. Also included is the incredibly moving story of concert pianist and teacher Leon Fleisher, whose loss of the use of his right hand for three decades transformed his life and approach to art. Sacks’s description of Fleisher playing a transcription of Bach’s “Sheep May Safely Graze” (the pianist regained use of his hand later in life through Botox treatments) for him alone will bring tears to your eyes. And what about those people who hate or feel indifferent towards music? One of them was the great writer Vladimir Nabokov, who wrote: “Music... affects me merely as an arbitrary succession of more or less irritating sounds… The concert piano and all wind instruments bore me in small doses and flay me in larger ones.” Before reading this book I didn’t realize that music crops up rarely in the works of Sigmund Freud, or the two James brothers, philosopher William and novelist Henry, although all three were sensitive to other varieties of human experience and expression. In a work filled with jaw-dropping stories, one of the most incredible happened to Sacks himself. One day he woke up from a musical dream, which followed him throughout the day. I found something deeply disturbing and unpleasant about the music, and longed for it to stop. I had a shower, a cup of coffee, went for a walk, shook my head, played a mazurka on the piano – to no avail. The hateful hallucinatory music continued unabated. Finally I phoned a friend, Orlan Fox, and said that I was hearing songs that I could not stop, songs that seemed to me full of melancholy and a sort of horror. The worst thing, I added, was that the songs were in German, a language I did not know. Orlan asked me to sing or hum some of the songs. I did so, and there was a long pause. “Have you abandoned some of your young patients?” he asked. “Or destroyed some of your literary children?” “Both,” I answered. “Yesterday, I resigned from the children’s unit at the hospital where I have been working, and I burned a book of essays I had written…. How did you guess?” “Your mind is playing Mahler’s Kindertotenlieder,” he said, “his songs of mourning for the death of children.” I was amazed by this, for I rather dislike Mahler’s music and would normally find it quite difficult to remember in detail, let alone sing, any of his Kindertotenlieder. But here my dreaming mind, with infallible precision, had come up with an appropriate symbol of the previous day’s events. And in the moment that Orlan interpreted the dream, the music disappeared; it has never recurred in the thirty years since. Amazing. Near the end, Sacks provides an illuminating and moving chapter on the connection between grief and music. How come some compositions provide consolation and catharsis? And there’s a touching chapter on patients with Williams Syndrome, people who tend to have IQs less than 60 but who have universally friendly personalities and extraordinary musical ability. There’s no overarching thesis or direction to Musicophilia – how could there be, really? – but there are plenty of studies and stories that will make you think twice next time you find yourself turning on your iPod. ** Fun fact: I noticed Sacks cites a study by a Simon Baron-Cohen. I Googled and, sure enough, the scientist is Borat’s (Sacha Baron Cohen) first cousin!

  2. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

    Sacks is, for me, a perfect meeting of a science writer and a writer of creative non-fiction. He has an equal interest in telling an affecting, human story and with exploring how (and why) the brain works. While lots of science writing is dry and objective (as it should be) and while mainstream feature writing often ignores the more complicated science stuff, Sacks is a rare talent who has a penchant for story telling and for explaining the newest research on the brain. He doesn’t condescend, an Sacks is, for me, a perfect meeting of a science writer and a writer of creative non-fiction. He has an equal interest in telling an affecting, human story and with exploring how (and why) the brain works. While lots of science writing is dry and objective (as it should be) and while mainstream feature writing often ignores the more complicated science stuff, Sacks is a rare talent who has a penchant for story telling and for explaining the newest research on the brain. He doesn’t condescend, and he doesn’t mind forming personal relationships with his subjects. In Musicophilia, Sacks focuses on the mysterious and fascinating connection between music and the brain. Through studying musical oddities in patients, he hopes, we can hope to better understand our greater relationship with music - something that, although it is universal among cultures, doesn’t seem to have a clear function or origin. For example, the book opens with a middle-aged man who is struck by lightening. He isn’t badly hurt, but since the accident, he’s been obsessed with the urge to play the piano. He’s never really played before or had an interest in music, but suddenly he’s up all night composing and trying to get better. Why has this happened? Why is unaffected except for this urge, which takes over his life? Brain scans show that his left frontal lobe has been damaged and Sacks hypothesizes that the left hemisphere of the brain might actually inhibit the more creative and musical right side of the brain. Left brain damage might lead to more “freedom” in the right brain. The book moves on from there to cover a huge spectrum of diseases, phenomenones, and rarities - spanning from music therapy for those with dementia and Alzheimer’s, to people who suffer from musical hallucinations, to people with perfect pitch, to people with amusica (to them, music sounds like noise - Nabokov suffered from it), to musical savants. The structures of the chapters are very satisfying to me: they start with a story of an individual and then, by the end of the segment, lead to a more general description of the science behind the patient’s symptoms. One of the more fascinating chapters covers children with William’s Syndrome, which affects about one out of 10,000 people. These people, who all have strangely elfin features, suffer from severe mental disabilities: they can’t ad 5 + 3, they can’t draw a square, they can’t tie their shoes. They have IQs around 60. However, they also tend to be very verbal, very social, and exceptionally musical. Most have perfect pitch and start composing as toddlers. Unlike some cases of severe autism who show a more mechanical and isolated musical talent, patients with William’s Syndrome love to play music in groups - within a community. Sacks visits a camp for children with William’s Syndrome - which is a constant drum circle, sing-along, and musical wrapped up in one. As in all of his tales, Sacks is sure to find the hope and humanity in even the most difficult patients. One man, an amnesiac who has a short-term memory of only a few seconds, can only stay present within himself while he plays the piano. More importantly, Sacks doesn’t see his patients as freaks or abnormalities who are simply interesting to read about, but rather as windows into how we can collectively understand how we function. In Musicophilia, I was truly moved by what I read - both by the humanity of the patients and by the awesomeness of the science.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Ana

    My brain, my heart and my soul needed this. The most random playlist in history: Jeff Buckley - Hallelujah Guns N' Roses - November Rain The Rolling Stones - Gimme Shelter Led Zeppelin - Babe I'm Gonna Leave You Alice In Chains - Nutshell Mother Love Bone – Chloe Dancer / Crown of Thorns The Verve - Bitter Sweet Symphony Queens Of The Stone Age - Make It Wit Chu 2Pac - Dear Mama 2Pac - Life Goes On 2Pac - Ghetto Gospel 2Pac - Hail Mary Eminem - Space Bound Eminem - Rap God Gangsta's Paradise - Coolio feat. L. My brain, my heart and my soul needed this. The most random playlist in history: Jeff Buckley - Hallelujah Guns N' Roses - November Rain The Rolling Stones - Gimme Shelter Led Zeppelin - Babe I'm Gonna Leave You Alice In Chains - Nutshell Mother Love Bone – Chloe Dancer / Crown of Thorns The Verve - Bitter Sweet Symphony Queens Of The Stone Age - Make It Wit Chu 2Pac - Dear Mama 2Pac - Life Goes On 2Pac - Ghetto Gospel 2Pac - Hail Mary Eminem - Space Bound Eminem - Rap God Gangsta's Paradise - Coolio feat. L.V. Kendrick Lamar - Humble The Notorious B.I.G. - Juicy Future - Mask Off Beastie Boys - Make Some Noise G-Eazy & Kehlani - Good Life The Weeknd feat. Daft Punk -Starboy Wiz Khalifa feat. Charlie Puth - See You Again The Chainsmokers - Sick Boy Mobb Deep - Shook Ones Jaymes Young - I'll Be Good Tamer – Beautiful Crime The Godfather- music of Henry Mancini with London Symphony Orchestra Lewis Capaldi ft. Jessie Reyez - Rush Dean Lewis – Waves (acoustic) Lana Del Rey - Born To Die Lana Del Rey – Summertime Sadness Pearl Jam – Sirens Mötley Crüe - You're All I Need Thriving Ivory - Angels On The Moon Ben Howard - Black Flies Red Hot Chili Peppers - Don't Forget Me The Civil Wars - Poison & Wine Florence and the Machine - Never Let Me Go Billie Eilish ft. Khalid - Lovely Lord Huron - The Night We Met Damien Rice – 9 Crimes Ryan Star - Losing Your Memory Sleeping At Last - Saturn Andrew Belle - In My Veins Lenny Kravitz - Calling All Angels Imagine Dragons – Friction Zayn - Dusk Till Dawn ft. Sia M83 - Midnight City NF - Can You Hold Me ft. Britt Nicole Jimmy Eat World - 23 Greta Svabo Bech ft. Ludovico Einaudi - Circles The Killers – Run For Cover Brandon Flowers - Lonely Town Muse - Starlight Vancouver Sleep Clinic- Killing Me To Love You Hymn De Lune – In Your Head Halsey – I Walk The Line Halsey - Is There Somewhere Until The Ribbon Breaks – One Way Or Another Arctic Monkeys - Do I Wanna Know? U2 - Every Breaking Wave Stevie Nicks - Edge of Seventeen The Irrepressibles - In This Shirt Nirvana - Something in the Way Nirvana - You Know You're Right Awolnation – Sail Laura Pausini & Andrea Bocelli - Vivo Per Lei Adele – When We Were Young Oasis - Champagne Supernova Barcelona – Please Don't Go Birdy – Wings Melissa Etheridge - You Can Sleep While I Drive One Republic – All This Time Sleeping Wolf - The Wreck of Our Hearts Audioslave - Like A Stone Aerosmith - Cryin' Bruce Springsteen - Dancing In The Dark Radiohead - No Surprises Meggie's Theme - Henry Mancini X-Ray Dog - The Vision X Ray Dog - Requiem Overture Audiomachine - An Unfinished Life Audiomachine – The Truth Jamin Winans - Ink Soundtrack (John's Walk ) James Horner - Briseis And Achilles – Troy Close Your Eyes - Buffy/Angel Theme Lisa Gerrard & Denez Prigent - Gortoz A Ran Gothic Storm - Whisper Of Hope The xx - Intro Mark Petrie – Surpass Balmorhea - Remembrance Zack Hemsey – See What I've Become Message To Bears – You Are a Memory Eagles - Hotel California BØRNS - American Money Temple Of The Dog - Hunger Strike Linkin Park – One More Light Pearl Jam – Black Massive Attack – Teardrop Eminem feat Sia - Beautiful Pain Gnash - I hate u, I love u ft. olivia o'brien Lana Del Rey – Mariners Apartment Complex LP – Girls Go Wild Civil Twilight – How'm I Supposed To Die Frida Sundemo – The Sun Kygo – This Town Jason Walker – Echo Paper Route – Dance on our graves Bat For Lashes - Siren Song The Replacements - Here Comes A Regular The Neighbourhood - Sweater Weather Florence + The Machine - Sky Full Of Song Leonard Cohen - In My Secret Life

  4. 5 out of 5

    Jafar

    This book was interesting, I guess. Lots of anecdotes about the effect of music on behavior and personality, but not enough analysis. Sacks usually is more of a story teller than a hardcore neuroscientist in his popular book – at least in the other two that I’ve read by him – but in this book he fails to be a good story teller too. Too many tidbits and little stories. I definitely recommend This Is Your Brain on Music over this book if you’re interested in a real scientific analysis of music and This book was interesting, I guess. Lots of anecdotes about the effect of music on behavior and personality, but not enough analysis. Sacks usually is more of a story teller than a hardcore neuroscientist in his popular book – at least in the other two that I’ve read by him – but in this book he fails to be a good story teller too. Too many tidbits and little stories. I definitely recommend This Is Your Brain on Music over this book if you’re interested in a real scientific analysis of music and our obsession with it. Every time that I read a book by Sacks or something similar I get a depressing feeling of being a slave to my brain. It just reinforces the idea that we are our brains. You don’t need to have any of the weird and often fascinating problems that Sacks’ patients have. Even in us “ordinary” people, our personality and behavior are governed by our brain chemistry and neural connectivity. Anatomy is destiny, as Freud said, if anatomy is to mean brain. The positive side is that this way of looking at people can lead to a better understanding and acceptance of others. Next time that you encounter someone with an unpleasant personality trait, or an annoying behavior, or a different outlook to life than yours, just remember that he has a different brain organization from yours. He’s just different from you. This helps to accept people and become less judgmental.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Jason

    It’s not a common characteristic, but I recommend this book for all environments where you read. Coffee shop, living room, park bench, subway, or to ignore your spouse--it receives my seal of 4+ stars. Musicophilia is a lurid, but respectable, look into the brains and lives of people that appear normal on the outside, but have strong, strange and intractable relationships to music. The relationship is sometimes harmful, often incomprehensible, sometimes therapeutic, even charming, but always unf It’s not a common characteristic, but I recommend this book for all environments where you read. Coffee shop, living room, park bench, subway, or to ignore your spouse--it receives my seal of 4+ stars. Musicophilia is a lurid, but respectable, look into the brains and lives of people that appear normal on the outside, but have strong, strange and intractable relationships to music. The relationship is sometimes harmful, often incomprehensible, sometimes therapeutic, even charming, but always unforgettable. And that’s the bottom line here for this book--incredibly interesting, highly readable, and, after reflecting about people in your lives with contagion to music, totally unforgettable. - Why do some people hear every musical tone in irrepressible color, like fireworks? - Why do snippets of songs lodge in the brain for days, weeks, years, even a lifetime? This is my introduction to Oliver Sacks. A renown neuroscientist with over 5 decades of experience, and a talent for presenting case studies to a plebeian reading public. The great majority of writers are not good writers. And, they’re not neuroscientists either. Sacks, however, is both. - What about the man with a 60 IQ who knows each note of 2500 symphonies? - Why do people with gross stuttering speak perfectly when they sing? Every human has a disease. Sometimes that disease is visible on the outside, and we stare and point, and tell our friends what we saw today--an alien rheumatoid hand, a debilitating kyphosis, a piebald psoriasis scar. Sometimes the affliction is in the mind and worn outside, like an Obsessive Compulisive Disorder, a neurodegeneration or a crippling social phobia. But, for the most part, we all have something--an undiagnosed disease or affliction--something we can manage to hide from everyone (so that people don’t point and stare and go home and tell their friends about what they saw in us today). Perversion, narco, nympho, criminality, victim, depression, protein mutation, future Alzheimer, next year’s dementia, next week’s suicide, next month’s spousal abuse, future diabetic, compulsion, addiction. We all mix together. Some of it’s our fault, some not. But it’s there. And most of it’s in the brain. I like reading psychological analysis of material cases. Psychology ‘levels’ the playing field, in a manner. It helps to know you’re not the only one that suffers from hidden affliction. - What about the man with amnesia so severe he can’t remember anything beyond 7 seconds ago, yet he plays the piano flawlessly when he never could before? - Why does music induce epilepsy? Based on a lifetime of personal interaction with patients, the author reveals scores of cases regarding music-related idiosyncrasies. Like a barbell, on the left are people who cringe at the sound of music, on the right are people who fail to thrive without music, and both sides are connected by a continuum, balanced through the middle. Musicophilia is a compilation that highlights a very recent surge in psychoanalytic and neuroscientific interest in music-based ailments and music-based therapy. There are fantastic new insights to how the brain compartmentalizes music, and how music is integrated as a global cortical tool. Apparently the brain has allocated a large--a mysteriously large--global amount of neurons to music, and we are only beginning to understand how and why. Medicine and science are beginning to pay attention to these emergent signs and symptoms. What was once overlooked and ridiculed, a mere footnote in the literature, is now a fertile growth area in psychoanalysis. - Why do only 1 in 1000 people have perfect pitch? - Why can music penetrate depression and dementia when human voice cannot? This book may not be a watershed event in science, but it was for me. I am amusical, arhythmic, and dysharmonic. It was refreshing to read that many people are like me, on the left side of the barbell. For every person that sings out loud or under their breath at work, there are 2 or 3 of us that can’t carry a tune and refuse to karaoke. It’s not that I don’t like music or can’t be moved or buoyed by music; it’s simply that I don’t have a complex relationship to music, and for the most part, I can take it or leave it. I listen to music about 45 minutes a week, mostly on radio during commute. I don’t collect music, stay current with music, play music, or talk about music. It’s quite common, even though you music-o-philes gasp incredulously at my hideousness. My parents are like this, my wife, my siblings, many of my friends. If I was imprisoned, I would miss reading and exercise, but not music. - Why is the prime symptom of Williams Syndrome an indefatigable attraction to music? - Why do humans have music hallucinations? Perhaps I was attracted to the title Musicophilia subconsciously. I know I’m socially deficient regarding things music, and maybe I wanted to discover what power music holds over people. Perhaps I wanted to apply definitions and causes to my amusia. Alas, I’m not deficient. My brain appreciates music, but has developed in other ways. Despite Oliver Sack’s covering cases like mine, I was quite interested to learn how important, indeed life-sustaining, music is for certain brains. - Why does music cause such a constellation of emotion in humans? - Why does a brain on music light up like cherries during CAT scans? My recently deceased grandfather had dementia near the end. A lanky nonagenarian with a full shock of white hair. He forgot a lot of things, including our names and when to urinate, but he didn’t forget how to polka or whistle or play the harmonica. Musicophilia will tell you why, but I like to think it’s because Gramps had something special I can’t yet find. I would have awarded 5-stars, but there was no transition between the chapters. Sometimes that works, but in non-fiction I like to see a framework guiding the book. I discovered a loose organization, but each chapter could stand independently in a journal like Neuroscience, Scientific American, or Psychology Today. Still...great take-aways. New words: synesthesia, metanoia, hypnagogic, hypnopompic, anhedonia

  6. 4 out of 5

    Huda Aweys

    في كتابي (الصوت روح) أشرت الى كوني مطمئنة ، و واثقة من أن الله عز و جل قد وفرّ للصم مداخل أخرى لأرواحهم (كوني عبرت عن نظريتي الروحانية حول السمع و عن كونه نافذة للروح و مدخل لها) ، .. و عن كوني لا املك فكرة حاليا عن تلك المداخل او الوسائل ، و ان كنت انوي بحثها مستقبلا ،، لأعثر الآن على سند (الى حد ما ، ليس سيئا كبداية لبحثي على الأقل ! ) لما قلت ، في كتاب علمي بحت .. هو هذا الكتاب الذي بين يدي الآن : مع انقطاع المدخلات السمعية الطبيعية ، قد تصبح القشرة السمعية مفرطة الحساسية بقدرات مضاعفة للتخيلات في كتابي (الصوت روح) أشرت الى كوني مطمئنة ، و واثقة من أن الله عز و جل قد وفرّ للصم مداخل أخرى لأرواحهم (كوني عبرت عن نظريتي الروحانية حول السمع و عن كونه نافذة للروح و مدخل لها) ، .. و عن كوني لا املك فكرة حاليا عن تلك المداخل او الوسائل ، و ان كنت انوي بحثها مستقبلا ،، لأعثر الآن على سند (الى حد ما ، ليس سيئا كبداية لبحثي على الأقل ! ) لما قلت ، في كتاب علمي بحت .. هو هذا الكتاب الذي بين يدي الآن : مع انقطاع المدخلات السمعية الطبيعية ، قد تصبح القشرة السمعية مفرطة الحساسية بقدرات مضاعفة للتخيلات الموسيقية (وحتى للهلوسات السمعية أحيانا) ، هناك ظاهرة مشابهة في أولئك الذين يفقدون بصرهم فبعض الناس الذين يصابون بالعمى ، قد يملكون على نحو متناقض ، تخيلات بصرية مضاعفة **************************************** أريد أن أقول إنها تأتي من السماء ، كما قال موزارت ... و عودة الى الكتاب .. ، في حالة سيكوريا ، هو رجل اقترب جدا من الموت ، و ذاك الاقتراب هو ما كان العامل المشترك فيما بينه و بين هؤلاء ممن لم يصعقهم البرق ! او يعانوا من امراض فيزيائية او سيكولوجية ، و الذي اشار الكاتب الى كونهم شعروا بالتحول الى الموسيقى في عقدهم الخامس و السادس و السابع .. وحتى التاسع ، ففي تلك السن يهدأ الانسان عن ذي قبل .. و يركز على جوهر الحياة اكثر من ذي قبل كذلك .. فهي سن منبهه للموت كالأمراض و الصواعق و التجارب الروحانية تماما !

  7. 5 out of 5

    Matt

    Oliver Sacks has been one of my favorite authors ever since I first read The Man Who Mistook his Wife for a Hat. I still completely amazed, and a little bit disturbed, when I think back to his account of the woman who lost her sense of proprioception - the internal body sense that lets you know your body is there, even when you have your eyes closed. No other author (since Proust) has explored the nuances of consciousness so carefully, nor pointed out how tenuous the our grip on reality can be. I Oliver Sacks has been one of my favorite authors ever since I first read The Man Who Mistook his Wife for a Hat. I still completely amazed, and a little bit disturbed, when I think back to his account of the woman who lost her sense of proprioception - the internal body sense that lets you know your body is there, even when you have your eyes closed. No other author (since Proust) has explored the nuances of consciousness so carefully, nor pointed out how tenuous the our grip on reality can be. I've enjoyed his other books that I've read, but his lost something since he wrote Man..". His subjects in that book were all his patients at one point - and that kind of clinical closeness gave a depth to his analysis that is slightly lacking in some of his later writing. The sense of amazement is still there, but it seems slightly shallower. Musicophilia may have the same problem, but it more than compensates with the sheer enthusiasm that Sacks brings to the project. His love of music permeates the whole book, and his obsessiveness regarding the subject brings back the depth that he lost with clinical distance. Certain chapters, such as the one on Synesthesia, rank as some of the best Sacks has written. He gives scientific backing to an idea often dismissed as myth, while at the same time bringing his usual humanistic bent - I was particular enchanted by a description by a synesthete of a conversation in his first grade class, in which he said he was "counting the colors until friday." Really fantastic stuff.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Kelly

    This was unexpectedly touching. I'm glad I finally read it. Review to come.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Lynne King

    I was flying forwards. Bewildered. I looked around. I saw my own body on the ground. I said to myself, ‘Oh shit, I’m dead.’ I saw people converging on the body. I saw a woman – she had been standing waiting to use the phone right behind me - position herself over my body, give it CPR … I floated up the stairs – my consciousness came with me. I saw my kids, had the realization that they would be okay. Then I was surrounded by a bluish-white light … an enormous feeling of well-being and peace. Th I was flying forwards. Bewildered. I looked around. I saw my own body on the ground. I said to myself, ‘Oh shit, I’m dead.’ I saw people converging on the body. I saw a woman – she had been standing waiting to use the phone right behind me - position herself over my body, give it CPR … I floated up the stairs – my consciousness came with me. I saw my kids, had the realization that they would be okay. Then I was surrounded by a bluish-white light … an enormous feeling of well-being and peace. The highest and lowest points of my life raced by me. No emotion associated with these … pure thought, pure ecstacy. I had the perception of accelerating, being drawn up … there was speed and direction. Then as I was saying to myself, ‘This is the most glorious feeling I have ever had’ – SLAM! I was back.” I will never cease to be amazed by books. This above account was given by Tony Cicoria, forty-two, very fit and robust, and a well-regarded orthopedic surgeon in a small city in upstate New York. He survived an experience of being struck by lighning. He continued his work but from this time on he had the most incredible need to connect with music. He was subsequently divorced and continued with his incredible sudden love for music and composition. I am not religious and I am not a believer, as such, but I know there is another life after death. I cannot describe it. It is certainly not faith but a certainty from what I have experienced during the last two years that tells me, yes, life continues after death. Many will believe that I am an absolute idiot but I really don’t care. We come from nothing (but there is no proof about this) indeed with birth, but we do indeed go to an illustrious future. Oliver Sacks has made the most incredible research of people with neurological conditions and all of these case studies are riveting. You can literally pick up this book and look at whatever page and find something amazing. It is really a remarkable reference book and I was just so enthralled to see individuals with evidently insurmountable problems and yet who managed to overcome these through music. Music is a wonderful thing and it indeed takes up a large part in our brain and so we must enjoy it. Well I do anyway. It was fascinating when Sacks said that there are certain musical pieces that he has to listen to over and over again before he moves on to a new composer. I can so relate to that. I am on “overkill’ at the moment with Grieg and Sibelius but there are indeed other composers waiting in the wings to enthrall me. Music – my… What else can I possibly say! I absolutely loved this book and continually look at it. It is in my library and there to stay.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Joshua Nomen-Mutatio

    The neurologist Oliver Sacks has a great book called Musicophilia (and a series of talks available on YouTube) which goes into some really interesting descriptions of the brain's relationship to music. One story involves a man getting hit by lightning and afterward having a newly acquired and deeply profound love of music (almost any music, too), profound to the point that he would feel a euphoria akin to religio-mystical rapture or an extremely pleasurable drug experience in all situations if m The neurologist Oliver Sacks has a great book called Musicophilia (and a series of talks available on YouTube) which goes into some really interesting descriptions of the brain's relationship to music. One story involves a man getting hit by lightning and afterward having a newly acquired and deeply profound love of music (almost any music, too), profound to the point that he would feel a euphoria akin to religio-mystical rapture or an extremely pleasurable drug experience in all situations if music began to play. And then the depressing opposite of this, a woman who hated all music because it all literally sounded like pots and pans clanking around. Her brain simply couldn't sort out the frequencies properly. Full Lecture by Oliver Sacks on Musicophilia: http://fora.tv/2007/10/21/Oliver_Sack... Shorter clips on the same subject: Amusia - total inability to hear music as "music" Music Therapy and Parkinson's The Power of Rhythm Strokes, Language, and Music - overcoming aphasia through music Bright Blue Music - synesthesia and music Earworms - the neurology of catchy tunes Amnesia and Music Bolt From The Blue - the one I mentioned about the guy being struck by lightning and so forth...

  11. 4 out of 5

    Gada

    !....وحدها الموسيقى تبقى في الكتاب حالات لبشر ما يقدروش يفتكروا أساميهم ما يقدروش يفتكروا إزاي يمسكوا المعلقه (بسبب زهايمر, سكته , ورم, مشكله اتولدوا بيها, حتى مع إستئصال أجزاء من الدماغ...إلخ) الإنسان ينسى كل حاجه و الموسيقى وحدها موجوده و هي الشيء الوحيد اللي أصعب الحالات بتتجاوب معاه المقصود بالموسيقى كل شيئ ليه نغمه..لحن, تراتيل..إلخ كتاب أكتر من رائع, سمعته أوديو...لفت نظري جداً لأهمية العلاج بالموسيقى و الفن عموماً (خصوصاً في موضوع التَوَحُد) , وحابه أعرف عنه أكتر كنت أتمنى أكون مثقفه موسيقياً !....وحدها الموسيقى تبقى في الكتاب حالات لبشر ما يقدروش يفتكروا أساميهم ما يقدروش يفتكروا إزاي يمسكوا المعلقه (بسبب زهايمر, سكته , ورم, مشكله اتولدوا بيها, حتى مع إستئصال أجزاء من الدماغ...إلخ) الإنسان ينسى كل حاجه و الموسيقى وحدها موجوده و هي الشيء الوحيد اللي أصعب الحالات بتتجاوب معاه المقصود بالموسيقى كل شيئ ليه نغمه..لحن, تراتيل..إلخ كتاب أكتر من رائع, سمعته أوديو...لفت نظري جداً لأهمية العلاج بالموسيقى و الفن عموماً (خصوصاً في موضوع التَوَحُد) , وحابه أعرف عنه أكتر كنت أتمنى أكون مثقفه موسيقياً علشان أفهم الكتاب أكتر E حاجات زي ...مفتاح مش عارفه ده معناه إيه بالضبط :S حبيت شوبان أكتر ما كنت بحبه بسبب الكتاب ده http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yCysEt... C Sharp Minor نفسي أفهم يعنى إيه

  12. 4 out of 5

    Keith Putnam

    I am a huge sucker for pop science about human consciousness. Sacks, unfortunately, has the habit of boring me with far too many anecdotes which he fails to link in any progression of Greater Understanding.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Bobby

    I really tried to perservere with this book, but after 100 pages I had to put it down. First, although marketed to a popular audience (even making it to the best sellers list), there are massive amounts of musical jargon and a background of musical knowledge would be extrememly helpful. Second, the books seemed to lack cohesive threads or narritive. I found it extremely disjointed with every few paragraphs changing to a different patient with very few being fully developed or resolved. Third, I I really tried to perservere with this book, but after 100 pages I had to put it down. First, although marketed to a popular audience (even making it to the best sellers list), there are massive amounts of musical jargon and a background of musical knowledge would be extrememly helpful. Second, the books seemed to lack cohesive threads or narritive. I found it extremely disjointed with every few paragraphs changing to a different patient with very few being fully developed or resolved. Third, I was also disappointed that specific discussion of music was usually about classical music. No mention of the effects of more popular musical genres was made in the portion I read. Other than a few interesting accounts and facts, I obtained little enjoyment or education from this book that seemed so promising.

  14. 4 out of 5

    brian tanabe

    This is my first oliver sacks -- I always meant to read the Man Who Mistook His Wife For a Hat but alas never got around to it. I love mr. sacks' delightful anecdotal storytelling and his intellect that makes fresh and accessible the study of the brain. It *almost* makes the issues dealt with in the book pleasant. In a nutshell, this book is about the power of music, backed by many accounts from the medical perspective of the interaction between music and the brain. It's hard to tell without a lot This is my first oliver sacks -- I always meant to read the Man Who Mistook His Wife For a Hat but alas never got around to it. I love mr. sacks' delightful anecdotal storytelling and his intellect that makes fresh and accessible the study of the brain. It *almost* makes the issues dealt with in the book pleasant. In a nutshell, this book is about the power of music, backed by many accounts from the medical perspective of the interaction between music and the brain. It's hard to tell without a lot of background knowledge on mr sacks and his previous works, but it seems as if in part this book is a culmination of much of his previous works and observations. A peripheral discussion that continued to dance through my head while reading this book is what is the "best" music to listen to? I kind of got the impression that classical music was most close to the primal drummings of the soul, but perhaps not. I mean mr sacks is an older fellow, and much of his observations were of patients from his earlier days practising, so is it fair to assume that classical music had a more august position in those days and was thus more clearly regarded as the truest form of music? Would any music do, any beat and rhythm that strikes a cord with the individual? I came away from this book wanting to listen to less podcasts and more music. I came away yet again regretting that I've never tried to play an instrument in my life. Ultimately, though, I came away with much more reverance for the power of music, more convinced that music just might be the surest and most direct path to self and the soul.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Nawar

    استحوذ هذا الكتاب على كل تفكيري لمدة 4 أيام على التوالي :) على الرغم من كونه كتاباً موجهاً للأطباء إلا أن الأفكار و الحوادث التي عرضها بطريقة سهلة و مبسطة تجعلها مفهومة و محببة لكل من يقرؤها يتحدث عن حالات خاصة و غريبة متعلقة بالموسيقا عند كل من المرضى و الأصحاء مما يجعلك في بعض الأحيان تشك في أن الدكتور ساكس يتحدث عنك في كتابه من أروع ما قرأت ^_^

  16. 5 out of 5

    zahraa

    لم استطع انهائه ربما بالمستقبل أعود إليه

  17. 5 out of 5

    Pierre Menard

    Leggendo questo bellissimo saggio di Sacks, rimango ancora una volta stupito dalla complessità del cervello umano, che si rende palpabile in questo lungo e dettagliato esame delle patologie neurologiche legate all'ampia sfera musicale. Proprio il fatto che esistano così tanti e così vari disturbi associati alla percezione e alla produzione musicale testimonia quanto profondo e articolato sia il rapporto tra la mente umana e la musica, che come anche le altre arti sembra essere quasi superflua da Leggendo questo bellissimo saggio di Sacks, rimango ancora una volta stupito dalla complessità del cervello umano, che si rende palpabile in questo lungo e dettagliato esame delle patologie neurologiche legate all'ampia sfera musicale. Proprio il fatto che esistano così tanti e così vari disturbi associati alla percezione e alla produzione musicale testimonia quanto profondo e articolato sia il rapporto tra la mente umana e la musica, che come anche le altre arti sembra essere quasi superflua da un punto di vista evolutivo e nel contempo gioca un ruolo fondamentale nell'esistenza individuale e nel tessuto connettivo delle società umane (in particolare per la sua relazione con la matematica e con la linguistica). Per “musicofilia” Sacks intende l'attitudine quasi esclusivamente umana per la musica (il canto degli uccelli nasce da un'esigenza chiaramente adattativa e non risulta quasi mai realmente creativo). La musica si distingue in modo netto dalle arti figurative perché è connessa all'udito anziché alla vista (ma ciò non è del tutto vero) e induce un coinvolgimento più profondo e intimo nell'essere umano. Su come ciò avvenga le neuroscienze riescono a dare risposte ancora incomplete, ma oggi, dice Sacks, sono disponibili molti strumenti d'indagine scientifica che una volta non esistevano. Il testo è diviso in quattro parti. La prima è dedicata all'acquisizione, eventualmente traumatica, della musicofilia: si parla di allucinazioni musicali, di canzoncine che rimangono in testa per periodi di tempo anche lunghissimi, di disturbi musicali legati all'epilessia. La seconda riguarda le caratteristiche della musicofilia legate a quelle del suono (timbro, altezza, armonia etc.): si discute dell'orecchio assoluto e di quello relativo, della stereofonia, dell'amusia (l'antitesi della musicofilia, da cui sembra fosse affetto Nabokov). Il capitolo più affascinante è quello dedicata alle sinestesie, le corrispondenze tra suoni, note, melodie e colori o sapori, che sono più frequenti nei musicisti di quanto si possa pensare. La terza parte racconta del rapporto tra musica e memoria e tra musica e movimento: le principali malattie associate a questi rapporti sono rispettivamente il morbo di Alzheimer e il morbo di Parkinson (e qui Sacks riprende molti casi clinici già affrontati in Risvegli), ma c'è spazio anche per la sindrome di Tourette, per le varie forme di amnesia, e per raccontare i traguardi della musicoterapia. L'ultima parte si spinge nelle profondità della mente umana: il legame tra musica ed emozioni, la seduzione esercitata dalla musica sulla mente, il ruolo della musica nel conservare frammenti di identità in persone affette da demenza o amnesia. Sacks cita più volte il saggio Music and the Mind (1982) dello psichiatra inglese Anthony Storr: secondo Storr, la musica ha un ruolo adattativo molto particolare, perché serve ad alleviare la noia, a ridurre la fatica e a rendere più gratificante la mera esistenza. Ciò riguarderebbe sia la musica “esterna”, ossia ascoltata, sia quella “interna”, prodotta dal cervello stesso. I sistemi neurali che presiedono alla produzione di musica “interna” hanno una tendenza all'attività spontanea e alla ripetizione che non ha riscontro nei sistemi dedicati alla percezione visiva. Dice Sacks che quando si ricorda una poesia o un'immagine visiva non c'è lo stesso profondo coinvolgimento che si verifica quando si immagina e si ricrea della musica nella nostra mente. Nel capitolo dedicato alle dimensioni della musicalità, Sacks racconta degli studi neuroscientifici che hanno evidenziato un ruolo fondamentale dell'educazione musicale nel plasmare il cervello: “le modificazioni anatomiche osservate nel cervello dei musicisti erano fortemente correlate con l'età dell'inizio della loro formazione musicale e con l'intensità dello studio e dell'esercizio”. Altro elemento ricorrente nel libro è l'orecchio assoluto, che sembra non essere particolarmente correlato con l'educazione musicale, anche se è certamente il prodotto dell'interazione tra genetica ed esperienza. Tra le malattie più curiose di cui parla Sacks, mi ha colpito molto la sindrome di Williams, a cui è dedicato un capitolo nella quarta parte e che per certi versi risulta antitetica all'autismo: chi ne soffre, oltre ad avere una particolare conformazione del volto, ha un basso Q.I., difficoltà con la matematica, con la percezione spaziale e temporale; per contro manifesta un talento descrittivo orale molto sviluppato, facilità nell'instaurare relazioni sociali e una vera e propria musicofilia. Oltre a riconoscere e ricordare centinaia di melodie e canzoni, i malati di questa sindrome provano grande piacere nel far musica insieme con altre persone. L'edizione che ho potuto leggere è la seconda (del 2008), considerevolmente rivista e ampliata dall'autore attraverso l'interazione con i lettori della prima (del 2007) che hanno contattato Sacks per metterlo a parte dei propri disturbi e delle proprie esperienza, arricchendo ulteriormente la già ampia casistica della prima edizione. Come sempre con Sacks, le note a piè di pagina e a fine capitolo si sprecano, e questo nuoce un po' alla leggibilità del testo: molte note potrebbero convenientemente essere inserite nel testo senza frammentarlo troppo. I riferimenti bibliografici sono sempre abbondanti e utili, e in questo saggio Sacks ha citato molti casi già affrontati nei libri precedenti (oltre a Risvegli, L'uomo che scambiò sua moglie per un cappello e Un antropologo su Marte). Ho letto alcune recensioni qui su GR che lamentano un po' il fatto che Sacks esageri nel riutilizzare quei casi e che ecceda nell'aneddotica a scapito dell'approfondimento neuroscientifico. Non condivido affatto queste critiche: i casi precedentemente affrontati vengono comunque presentati in una luce nuova, inerente esclusivamente agli aspetti musicali, e dal confronto con casi non discussi in precedenza si possono trarre nuove informazioni. Per quanto riguarda la critica sulla dimensione aneddotica del libro, credo che manchi il bersaglio: Sacks non vuole scrivere un trattato di neurologia, ma raccontare con rispetto e grandissima umanità disturbi e malattie legate alla sfera musicale e i loro effetti sugli esseri umani che ne sono afflitti e su chi è loro vicino (genitori, coniugi, amici, figli etc.). Le spiegazioni tecniche e l'analisi scientifica, semplice e rigorosa, mai eccessiva, sono finalizzate a caratterizzare meglio la situazione di queste persone, ma ciò che interessa è il rapporto tra individuo e malattia. Sacks è un neurologo, ossia un medico, non un neuroscienziato. La grande umanità di Sacks si nota anche nel suo porsi sempre nei panni del malato oltreché in quelli del medico, quando racconta delle proprie esperienze di disturbi “musicali” senza inutili pudori, ma con grande attenzione ai particolari. Consigliato a chi si sveglia con un motivetto nella testa. Sconsigliato a chi ascolta solo musica da discoteca.

  18. 5 out of 5

    India

    Sacks relives the pathologies of musical response in his patients while working at Beth Abraham Hospital. He describes music as a panacea and says, “they were liberated by music.” This applies to patients with dementia and those suffering from Williams Syndrome. Despite low IQ, he honors them in kind descriptive terms: having wide mouths, upturned noses and a true adoration of music. “We humans are a musical species no less than a linguistic one...we perceive tones, timbre, pitch intervals, melo Sacks relives the pathologies of musical response in his patients while working at Beth Abraham Hospital. He describes music as a panacea and says, “they were liberated by music.” This applies to patients with dementia and those suffering from Williams Syndrome. Despite low IQ, he honors them in kind descriptive terms: having wide mouths, upturned noses and a true adoration of music. “We humans are a musical species no less than a linguistic one...we perceive tones, timbre, pitch intervals, melodic contours, harmony (perhaps most elementally) rhythm. We integrate all of these and “construct” music in our minds...” ---Oliver Sacks, MD Sacks' deeply warm and sympathetic study is about pathologies of musical response and erudition gained from a "normal" faculty of music. In addition, within are new findings from anatomy. We also learn “how is the musicians mind different than others?” There is the curious case of Harry S. having a perfect tenor voice yet he showed no emotion, except when he sang---as if music brought him to life). Exceptional study and storytelling by Dr. Oliver Sacks. The connections that music impart and patient studies (L-Dopa) are in “Awakenings.” I found interesting the case study of a 42-year-old man struck by lightning, then he developed an exigent thirst for music learned to play piano and compose. Truly an effervescent account of life. Found personal “drug use” confessions by Sacks surprising. Read and explore your reaction to music.

  19. 5 out of 5

    liz

    I wasn't hugely impressed with this. Sacks's writing sometimes gets extremely dry as he goes into the technicalities of how the brain functions. I found his other books, with chapters each covering a variety of conditions ("Anthropologist on Mars," "The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat"), to be much stronger, even though they were less consistent thematically. It seemed that at times Sacks had to stretch to find patients with some of the musical conditions he described -- not a good sign, sinc I wasn't hugely impressed with this. Sacks's writing sometimes gets extremely dry as he goes into the technicalities of how the brain functions. I found his other books, with chapters each covering a variety of conditions ("Anthropologist on Mars," "The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat"), to be much stronger, even though they were less consistent thematically. It seemed that at times Sacks had to stretch to find patients with some of the musical conditions he described -- not a good sign, since some of his best work consists of describing individuals' conditions and then working out what might be causing them. He also borrowed heavily from cases described in his other works. It made me wonder, what would motivate someone to write a book if he didn't have the necessary new material? ...infants at six months can readily detect all rhythmic variations, but by twelve months their range has narrowed, albeit sharpened. They can now more easily detect the types of rhythms to which they have previously been exposed; they learn and internalize a set of rhythms for their culture. Adults find it harder still to perceive "foreign" rhythmic distinctions.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Faye

    2.5 stars I am a music geek. I play piano and I'm also taking a Music Theory Class right now. So I was really pumped to read a book about how music affects you. But the thing is, all these concept aren't explored. I feel like too many topics were squeezed into one book. Even more, some of them are very repetitive. In this book, I've read in so many chapters about how people with certain disorders and illnesses have a special reaction to music. Yes, there are many diseases, but it just got really r 2.5 stars I am a music geek. I play piano and I'm also taking a Music Theory Class right now. So I was really pumped to read a book about how music affects you. But the thing is, all these concept aren't explored. I feel like too many topics were squeezed into one book. Even more, some of them are very repetitive. In this book, I've read in so many chapters about how people with certain disorders and illnesses have a special reaction to music. Yes, there are many diseases, but it just got really repetitive. I even ended up skimming some of these chapters. But I did learn some new things. I wasn't anymore convinced that music is amazing, because I already knew that, but I did learn some new things neurologically speaking about music. But this book really was so repetitive and boring.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Aaron

    Starts off with a fairly unsatisfying collection of anecdotes around loss or gain of musical ability. The real heft arrives halfway as Sacks starts pulling together the real research and making implications. The message here is that music is not some frivolous side effect of our neurology. Rather, music is processed by dedicated machinery in our brains and can affect us in profound and surprising ways. There are tantalising implications that humans have the capacity for much greater musical abilit Starts off with a fairly unsatisfying collection of anecdotes around loss or gain of musical ability. The real heft arrives halfway as Sacks starts pulling together the real research and making implications. The message here is that music is not some frivolous side effect of our neurology. Rather, music is processed by dedicated machinery in our brains and can affect us in profound and surprising ways. There are tantalising implications that humans have the capacity for much greater musical ability, if it were developed correctly. One suggestion is that people in Western countries miss out on developing 'perfect pitch', because our languages are agnostic to the tone of voice used - unlike the sing-song tonality of say, Chinese. Evidently one of the few books around on the subject - worth a read but not Sacks' best.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Benjamin

    I get the feeling Oliver Sacks likes to reuse material. He retells the stories of his clients throughout his books, always with references to his other work. This isn't entirely bad, but I had to speed through some parts that were a tad bit repetitive. The subject matter is fascinating, and perfectly delivered for the layman(Which I happen to be). I have a newfound respect for the power of music therapy and music itself.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Arsnoctis

    Non ho potuto dedicargli il tempo che avrei voluto, quindi il primo consiglio che mi sento di dare su questo libro è: leggetelo con calma. Ciò scritto, si tratta di un libro ricco di contenuti e naturalmente interessante per chiunque sia interessato alla musica, alle dinamiche del cervello umano o a entrambe le cose. Un testo ricco di curiosità e aneddoti che ha la caratteristica di rifiutare la forma del romanzo o della storia unica per frammentarsi in una serie di minisaggi su singole persone Non ho potuto dedicargli il tempo che avrei voluto, quindi il primo consiglio che mi sento di dare su questo libro è: leggetelo con calma. Ciò scritto, si tratta di un libro ricco di contenuti e naturalmente interessante per chiunque sia interessato alla musica, alle dinamiche del cervello umano o a entrambe le cose. Un testo ricco di curiosità e aneddoti che ha la caratteristica di rifiutare la forma del romanzo o della storia unica per frammentarsi in una serie di minisaggi su singole persone e/o patologie. L'edizione è ricca di note a margine. Gradevole la scelta di un corpo del testo più grande in presenza di un tema tanto denso.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Alex

    Musicophelia is an enchanting read, though one is struck more by the phenomena depicted—amusias, musical hallucinations, comatose patients suddenly "awakened" by nothing more than a familiar melody—than the manner of their depiction. Sacks has always been lauded for his fluid, personable style, and for good reason, but in the wake of classics such as The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat and Uncle Tungsten, his writing seems excessively florid and repetitive—neither tight enough nor substantial Musicophelia is an enchanting read, though one is struck more by the phenomena depicted—amusias, musical hallucinations, comatose patients suddenly "awakened" by nothing more than a familiar melody—than the manner of their depiction. Sacks has always been lauded for his fluid, personable style, and for good reason, but in the wake of classics such as The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat and Uncle Tungsten, his writing seems excessively florid and repetitive—neither tight enough nor substantial enough to match the subject he loves so well. My other criticism is that for all it's heartstopping wonder, Musicophelia rarely buckles down to the core of things. Only at specific points does Sacks truly explore the philosophical or psychological implications of his subjects. I confess I've encountered many of these "clinical tales" in his earlier books and articles, and hence, the net result feels to me more like a compendium or "greatest hits" album rather than a fully realized examination like Migraine. The key questions—what do organized tones mean to us? why have we evolved to perceive and celebrate rhythm? what is the relationship between music and language?—are touched upon, but only superficially discussed.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Aya Abo3ghreb

    قد يكون هذا الكتاب من أمتع ما كتب عن علاقة الدماغ والإنسان عموما بالموسيقى غصت فيه لأكثر من 4 أشهر أتلذذ به على مهل كأنه فطيرة زبدية بالفراولة! فلأوليفر ساكس طريقة ساحرة في الكلام عن تجاربة وأراءه العلمية وكل تلك النظريات والحالات التي ذكرها في كتابه هذا أو من مراجع أخرى تتضن كتبا له وأعمالا علمية لأخرين كلها مع فكرة الكتاب نفسه صنعت منه كتابا علميا ماتعا يمكن أن يفهمه المتخصص والعامي على حدّ سواء ولكن الممتع فيه أكثر برأيي هو كمية الأسئلة المطروحة مقارنة بتلك المجابة، وهذا الممتع بالذات، فسيجعلك قد يكون هذا الكتاب من أمتع ما كتب عن علاقة الدماغ والإنسان عموما بالموسيقى غصت فيه لأكثر من 4 أشهر أتلذذ به على مهل كأنه فطيرة زبدية بالفراولة! فلأوليفر ساكس طريقة ساحرة في الكلام عن تجاربة وأراءه العلمية وكل تلك النظريات والحالات التي ذكرها في كتابه هذا أو من مراجع أخرى تتضن كتبا له وأعمالا علمية لأخرين كلها مع فكرة الكتاب نفسه صنعت منه كتابا علميا ماتعا يمكن أن يفهمه المتخصص والعامي على حدّ سواء ولكن الممتع فيه أكثر برأيي هو كمية الأسئلة المطروحة مقارنة بتلك المجابة، وهذا الممتع بالذات، فسيجعلك تفكر معه وتتساءل معه وتتبادل في ذهنك النظريات المختلفة وصحة حقيقتها حول الدماغ والموسيقى وفكرة الذات والوعي وما يتلعق بهما، هذه الأشياء الغير محددة بعد، الغير معرفة أتم التعريف، وهذا بالضبط ما شدد عليه منهج هذا الكتاب: الرؤية النظرية للحالات الشخصية المطروحة دون التعمق في كثير من الأحيان حول طبيعتها الحقيقية. والسحر كما يقال دائما يكمن في السؤال! وبالمناسبة وجدت الترجمة ممتازة جدا وهذا ليس بجديد على دار العربية للعلوم ناشرون حتى إن عنوان الكتاب المنقول عن الأصل : musicophilia النزعة إلى الموسيقى موفّق جدا أرشحه للجميع وخصوصا لمحبي علم الأعصاب والموسيقيين

  26. 5 out of 5

    Virginia Pavone

    Musicofilia è un saggio da leggere sicuramente in pillole, cosa che non ho fatto io. Ciò nonostante, questo bel tomo di 400 pagine, rimane un interessantissimo saggio sul rapporto cervello/musica. Quanta rilevanza ha la musica nelle nostre vite? Perché in alcuni pazienti post traumatici o post coma insorge tutto a un tratto uno spirito musicale? Perché i tormentoni ci rimangono in testa? la muiscoterapia è davvero efficace? Tutte queste domande e molte altre vengono analizzate in modo esaustivo Musicofilia è un saggio da leggere sicuramente in pillole, cosa che non ho fatto io. Ciò nonostante, questo bel tomo di 400 pagine, rimane un interessantissimo saggio sul rapporto cervello/musica. Quanta rilevanza ha la musica nelle nostre vite? Perché in alcuni pazienti post traumatici o post coma insorge tutto a un tratto uno spirito musicale? Perché i tormentoni ci rimangono in testa? la muiscoterapia è davvero efficace? Tutte queste domande e molte altre vengono analizzate in modo esaustivo tramite aneddoti del dottor Sacks sui suoi pazienti o su pazienti altrui. Dico che é da centellinare in quanto non ferrata con il linguaggio medico/neurologico. Perciò, se non lo siete neppure voi, be careful. Ma se siete amanti della musica e/o curiosi, consigliassimo.

  27. 4 out of 5

    رغد قاسم

    كتاب مرهق للغاية :( أعشق الكتب العلمية جداً و خصوصاً تلك الكتب لإخصائي علم الاعصاب و اوليفر ساكس يتميز باسلوبه الادبي الرفيع و معلوماته الواسعة بعيداً عن عالم الطب و دخوله إلى أجواء المرضى الداخلية و الاهتمام النادر بهم على عكس ما اعتدناه من جفاء الاطباء.. معلوماتي الموسيقية صفر ، وانا لا استطيع أن أترك كتاباً دون أكماله ما دام "أكرام الكتاب ختمه" و كذلك لا أستطيع أكمال كتاب دون أن افهمه ..لذا اضطررت إلى الاستعانة بالكوكل عدة مرات و تحميل كتب و مقاطع فيديو و اغاني لإعرف ما يتحدث عنه .. الكتاب مثير كتاب مرهق للغاية :( أعشق الكتب العلمية جداً و خصوصاً تلك الكتب لإخصائي علم الاعصاب و اوليفر ساكس يتميز باسلوبه الادبي الرفيع و معلوماته الواسعة بعيداً عن عالم الطب و دخوله إلى أجواء المرضى الداخلية و الاهتمام النادر بهم على عكس ما اعتدناه من جفاء الاطباء.. معلوماتي الموسيقية صفر ، وانا لا استطيع أن أترك كتاباً دون أكماله ما دام "أكرام الكتاب ختمه" و كذلك لا أستطيع أكمال كتاب دون أن افهمه ..لذا اضطررت إلى الاستعانة بالكوكل عدة مرات و تحميل كتب و مقاطع فيديو و اغاني لإعرف ما يتحدث عنه .. الكتاب مثير للاهتمام و يستحق التعب :)

  28. 5 out of 5

    Donna

    This is nonfiction neuroscience.....about the brain and music and how each of them can effect the other. Some of the science was fascinating. I also enjoyed the plethora of (case studies) stories the author cited. All the examples were different. I really felt for some of these patients because some of this sounded like awful afflictions, not a gift.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Malbadeen

    Woooooooa!!! Heeeeeeey!!!! Look at me I'm Oliver Sacks and I'm tellin you some more wacky stuff about brains. oh-la-la. I'm so fancy. (interesting topic but I prefer the podcast interview to the book - which I was able to stick with through apx. chapter 6 before throwing in the towell. http://www.npr.org/templates/story/st...)

  30. 4 out of 5

    عمر الحمادي

    ليس أفضل كتب المؤلف التي قرأتها، جيد في فصوله الأولى، سردي قصصي في آخره. قد يدرك الإنسان الموسيقى حسياً بدقة، لكنه يبقى غير متأثرٍ بها، وعلى العكس، قد تحرك مشاعره بشدة بالرغم من كونه عاجزاً عن فهم ما يسمع، طور بعض المرضى نزعة مفاجئة لعشق الموسيقى، وقد يكون لذلك علاقة بالخرف الجبهي الصدغي الذي قد يحرر هوايات ومواهب موسيقية مع فقدانهم لقوى التجريد واللغة. يبدو أن معظم التخيلات الموسيقية ترد إلينا بشكل عفوي، بل بعضها يأتي وكأنه قد برز في العقل فجأة، وأحياناً قد تكون الموسيقى التي تدور في خلدك هي مفتا ليس أفضل كتب المؤلف التي قرأتها، جيد في فصوله الأولى، سردي قصصي في آخره. قد يدرك الإنسان الموسيقى حسياً بدقة، لكنه يبقى غير متأثرٍ بها، وعلى العكس، قد تحرك مشاعره بشدة بالرغم من كونه عاجزاً عن فهم ما يسمع، طور بعض المرضى نزعة مفاجئة لعشق الموسيقى، وقد يكون لذلك علاقة بالخرف الجبهي الصدغي الذي قد يحرر هوايات ومواهب موسيقية مع فقدانهم لقوى التجريد واللغة. يبدو أن معظم التخيلات الموسيقية ترد إلينا بشكل عفوي، بل بعضها يأتي وكأنه قد برز في العقل فجأة، وأحياناً قد تكون الموسيقى التي تدور في خلدك هي مفتاح حالتك النفسية، وأحياناً تأسرك أغنية معجون أسنان وتتكرر في داخلك على نحو مزعج لا تستطيع مقاومته، وهذا ما أطلق عليه البعض ظاهرة الديدان الدماغية أو الأذنية، فالموسيقى هنا تبدو كأنها محتجزة في دائرة كهربائية مُحكمة لا يمكن الإفلات منها، وهناك مرضى صاروا أسرى هلوسات موسيقية دائمة بعد إجراء عملية جراحية والاستفاقة من التخدير، وظلت مع أحدهم شهوراً تلازمه طوال الليل بشكل مزعج، حتى أنه ما إن يتذكر كلمة من أغنية حتى تهجم الأغنية كاملة عليه من الممكن أن تكون تخيلات بتهوفن الموسيقية قد ازدادت شدة بالصمم، لأنه مع انقطاع المدخلات السمعيك الطبيعية قد تصبح القشرة السمعية مفرطة الحساسية وبقدرات مضاعفة، وهناك أناس يصابون بالعمى وثم تتضاعف تخيلاتهم البصرية.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.