kode adsense disini
Hot Best Seller

The Complete Poetry

Availability: Ready to download

The first complete annotated edition of Milton's poetry available in a one-volume paperback. The text is established from original sources, with collations of all known manuscripts, chronology and verbal variants recorded. Works in Latin, Greek and Italian are included with new literal translations.


Compare
kode adsense disini

The first complete annotated edition of Milton's poetry available in a one-volume paperback. The text is established from original sources, with collations of all known manuscripts, chronology and verbal variants recorded. Works in Latin, Greek and Italian are included with new literal translations.

30 review for The Complete Poetry

  1. 4 out of 5

    Edward

    Preface Table of Dates Further Reading Poems 1645 --On the Morning of Christ's Nativity --A Paraphrase on Psalm 114 --Psalm 136 --The Passion --On Time --Upon the Circumcision --At a Solemn Music --An Epitaph on the Marchioness of Winchester --Song. On May Morning --On Shakespeare. 1630 --On the University Carrier --Another on the Same --L'Allegro --Il Penseroso --Sonnet I ('O nightingale') --Sonnet II ('Donna leggiadra') --Sonnet III ('Qual in colle aspro') --Canzone --Sonnet IV ('Diodati, e te'l dirò') --Sonnet V Preface Table of Dates Further Reading Poems 1645 --On the Morning of Christ's Nativity --A Paraphrase on Psalm 114 --Psalm 136 --The Passion --On Time --Upon the Circumcision --At a Solemn Music --An Epitaph on the Marchioness of Winchester --Song. On May Morning --On Shakespeare. 1630 --On the University Carrier --Another on the Same --L'Allegro --Il Penseroso --Sonnet I ('O nightingale') --Sonnet II ('Donna leggiadra') --Sonnet III ('Qual in colle aspro') --Canzone --Sonnet IV ('Diodati, e te'l dirò') --Sonnet V ('Per certo') --Sonnet VI ('Giovane piano') --Sonnet VII ('How soon hath Time') --Sonnet VIII ('Captain or colonel') --Sonnet IX ('Lady that in the prime') --Sonnet X ('Daughter to that good Earl') --Arcades --Lycidas --A Masque Presented at Ludlow Castle ['Comus'] English Poems Added in 1673 --On the Death of a Fair Infant --At a Vacation Exercise --Sonnet XI ('A book was writ of late') --Sonnet XII On the same ('I did but prompt the age') --Sonnet XIII To Mr H. Lawes, on his Airs --Sonnet XIV ('When Faith and Love') --Sonnet XV On the Late Massacre in Piedmont --Sonnet XVI ('When I consider how my light is spent') --Sonnet XVII ('Lawrence of virtuous father') --Sonnet XVIII ('Cyriack, whose grandsire') --Sonnet XIX ('Methought I saw my late espouséd saint') --The Fifth Ode of Horace --On the New Forcers of Conscience Psalm Paraphrases Added in 1673 --Psalms I-VIII --Psalms LXXX-LXXXVIII Uncollected English Poems --On the Lord General Fairfax --To the Lord General Cromwell --To Sir Henry Vane the Younger --To Mr Cyriack Skinner upon his Blindness --'Fix Here' Translations From the Prose Works --'Ah Constantine, of how much ill' --'Founded in chaste and humble poverty' --'Then passed he to a flow'ry mountain green' --'When I die' --'Laughing to teach the truth' --'Jesting decides great things' --''Tis you that say it, not I' --'This is true liberty, when freeborn men' --'Whom do we count a good man' --'There can be slain' --'Goddess of shades, and huntress' --'Brutus far to the west' --'Low in a mead of kine' --Paradise Lost --Paradise Regained --Samson Agonistes The Latin and Greek Poems Elegiarum Liber --Elegia I Ad Carolum Diodatum --Elegia II In Obitum Praeconis Academici Cantabrigiensis --Elegia III In Obitum Praesulis Wintoniensis --Elegia IV Ad Thomam Iunium --Elegia V In adventum veris --Elegia VI Ad Carolum Diodatum, ruri commorantem --Elegia VII Anno aetatis undevigesimo --'Haec ego mente' --In Proditionem Bombardicam --In eandem --In eandem --In eandem --In Inventorem Bombardae --Ad Leonoram Romae canentem --Ad eandem --Ad eandem Silvarum Liber --In Obitum Procancellarii Medici --In Quintum Novembris --In Obitum Praesulis Eliensis --Naturam non pati senium --De Idea Platonica quemadmodum Aristoteles intellexit --Ad Patrem Greek Verses: --Psalm CXIV --Philosophus ad Regem --Ad Salsillum --Mansus --Epitaphium Damonis Greek and Latin Poems Added in 1673 --Apologus de Rustico et Hero --In Effigiei eius Sculptorem --Ad Ioannem Rousium Latin Poems from the Prose Works --Epigram from Pro Populo Anglicano Defensio --Epigram from Defensio Secunda Unpublished Latin Poems --Carmina Elegiaca --[Asclepiads] Notes Index of Titles Index of First Lines

  2. 5 out of 5

    Morgan

    This book is actually only 611 pages with 362 pages of notes. I didn't really bother to read the notes. Maybe another day I'll read this book again to study the whole thing over. I really love Milton. He might just be my favorite poet. In college, I believe, I only read Paradise Lost. I might have read Paradise Regained, but I don't remember reading that one. The rest of these poems were brand new for me. Most of them I liked too. One of the main reasons I like Milton is because he's such a good w This book is actually only 611 pages with 362 pages of notes. I didn't really bother to read the notes. Maybe another day I'll read this book again to study the whole thing over. I really love Milton. He might just be my favorite poet. In college, I believe, I only read Paradise Lost. I might have read Paradise Regained, but I don't remember reading that one. The rest of these poems were brand new for me. Most of them I liked too. One of the main reasons I like Milton is because he's such a good writer. Something about his poems give me light in my dark brain. I can see why William Blake liked him so much. I also like Milton because who he was as a person, but this is his poems, not his non-fiction, which I have to read at some point. If you never read Milton before, I recommended him. He's not really for everyone. Depends if you like old poets and don't mind pro-religious writers. His words are truly beautiful.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Garrett Cash

    Milton is considered one of the few greatest poets in the English language, so obviously a complete collection of his poetry is going to be pretty good. As complete collections normally go, there's a lack of consistency in the interest level that some people are going to be bound to have as far as reading this straight-through goes. I just skimmed the Latin/Greek poems for instance since they basically seemed like exercises in writing classically that were nonessential for me. If I were to rank Milton is considered one of the few greatest poets in the English language, so obviously a complete collection of his poetry is going to be pretty good. As complete collections normally go, there's a lack of consistency in the interest level that some people are going to be bound to have as far as reading this straight-through goes. I just skimmed the Latin/Greek poems for instance since they basically seemed like exercises in writing classically that were nonessential for me. If I were to rank every work in this it would go like this: Paradise Lost 5/5 Paradise Regained 5/5 Samson Agonistes 4.5/5 Comus 4/5 Early poems 3/5 overall (some are higher/lower) Latin/Greek poems 2/5 Suffice to say these works are essential for any student of English writing, poetry, great human achievement in art, and Christianity or classicism in literature. I especially recommend reading Paradise Lost at least.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Lance Schaubert

    originally @ http://literating.wordpress.com/2011/... John Milton in VOLUME FOUR of the Harvard classics feels like semi-automatic catharsis. One of his poems, an early composition on the passion of Christ Milton quit halfway, hid this gem: Befriend me, Night, best Patroness of grief! Over the pole thy thickest mantle throw, And work my flattered fancy to belief That Heaven and Earth are coloured with my woe; My sorrows are too dark for day to know: The leaves should all be black whereon I write, And le originally @ http://literating.wordpress.com/2011/... John Milton in VOLUME FOUR of the Harvard classics feels like semi-automatic catharsis. One of his poems, an early composition on the passion of Christ Milton quit halfway, hid this gem: Befriend me, Night, best Patroness of grief! Over the pole thy thickest mantle throw, And work my flattered fancy to belief That Heaven and Earth are coloured with my woe; My sorrows are too dark for day to know: The leaves should all be black whereon I write, And letters, where my tears have washed, a wannish white.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Chantal

    How can you not give 5 stars to Milton?

  6. 5 out of 5

    Christian

    My third time through Paradise Lost, first time through Paradise Regained, Samson Agonistes, Comus, etc. All appropriately staggering in their complexity and (newly apparent to me) their tenderness. I had read a smattering of the smaller poems before - a few sonnets and the poem on time. I mentioned to Jim Nance that I was taking a class on Milton and he proceeded to recite part of On the Morning of Christ's Nativity without moving from his chair, which was a surprise and a treat. Maybe I'm readi My third time through Paradise Lost, first time through Paradise Regained, Samson Agonistes, Comus, etc. All appropriately staggering in their complexity and (newly apparent to me) their tenderness. I had read a smattering of the smaller poems before - a few sonnets and the poem on time. I mentioned to Jim Nance that I was taking a class on Milton and he proceeded to recite part of On the Morning of Christ's Nativity without moving from his chair, which was a surprise and a treat. Maybe I'm reading too much into it, but it was pretty amazing to see the consistency in Milton's poetry and how well it dovetails with what he says about poetry, education, and virtue in his prose writings. He truly believed poetry was a divine calling, able to shape desires and teach people how to worship. His Arian leanings are probably the only reason he's not the patron saint of Classical Christian Education.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Dickson

    I had not read Milton for years and when I did, it was required reading. After re-reading Paradise Lost--and Regained--I ordered Blake's Milton from the Folio Society in England. Ouch, 90 or so pounds, but what a treat! Yes, I've decided that our educational system may have gone a bit astray in the late 60's when dead white European males fell out of favor. Now, before going off to write my American Studies phD thesis on "The Secret Life of TV Pundits" I plan to spend some time again out of Para I had not read Milton for years and when I did, it was required reading. After re-reading Paradise Lost--and Regained--I ordered Blake's Milton from the Folio Society in England. Ouch, 90 or so pounds, but what a treat! Yes, I've decided that our educational system may have gone a bit astray in the late 60's when dead white European males fell out of favor. Now, before going off to write my American Studies phD thesis on "The Secret Life of TV Pundits" I plan to spend some time again out of Paradise with Milton.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Topher

    Some dreadfully bookish stuff mixed in with some truly breathtaking and inimitable poetry that I could read a dozen more times and gain something new with each reading. Not for the faint of heart, but the guy was blind, wrote fifty meanings into every line and completely changed the face of the Christian religion (which most modern Christians don't even realize). Maybe he's worth a read.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Zayne

    I'm in the midst of this as a part of my Milton class. I'm learning the depths of allusion and Biblical mysticsm. And the poetic tradition of brag-adociousness. Milton to Mos Def...that would be a class!

  10. 4 out of 5

    Andy

    ... Farewell happy fields, Where joy forever dwells: hail, horrors!

  11. 4 out of 5

    Trey Kennedy

    Spent most of my time with Paradise Lost. Still one of my favorite books.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Kilian Metcalf

    Last summer one of the academic members of Temple Emanu-El in Tucson, Wendy Weise PhD, offered a class on the topics of the Garden of Eden, sex, and lost innocence. Her material included several excerpts from Milton’s Paradise Lost. I was intrigued and decided to use Milton’s poetry to fill one of the squares in the Books on the Nightstand summer Bingo card, the square set aside for a selection from the Harvard Classics Five Foot Shelf of Books. I had never read Milton’s poetry, although I was f Last summer one of the academic members of Temple Emanu-El in Tucson, Wendy Weise PhD, offered a class on the topics of the Garden of Eden, sex, and lost innocence. Her material included several excerpts from Milton’s Paradise Lost. I was intrigued and decided to use Milton’s poetry to fill one of the squares in the Books on the Nightstand summer Bingo card, the square set aside for a selection from the Harvard Classics Five Foot Shelf of Books. I had never read Milton’s poetry, although I was familiar with the names of his major works. It was a revelation to read Paradise Lost with its vivid imagery. Why no one has made a graphic novel out of this work is beyond me. One surprising element Milton added to the familiar story was the effect that the beauty and innocence of Eve had on the Serpent. Read the rest at https://theinterstitialreader.wordpre...

  13. 4 out of 5

    Alex Kartelias

    It saddens me to say I am not a huge fan of Paradise Lost. After abandoning it after the first book in 10th grade, I knew I needed to read it because of how significant it is to British literature. But now that it's done, I don't quite feel like he explained, "the ways of God to men". However, his, "On Time" is probably one of the finest poems written in the English language. It has haunted me ever since I read it years back. Perhaps Paradise Lost needs a second reading, but I won't deny that Mi It saddens me to say I am not a huge fan of Paradise Lost. After abandoning it after the first book in 10th grade, I knew I needed to read it because of how significant it is to British literature. But now that it's done, I don't quite feel like he explained, "the ways of God to men". However, his, "On Time" is probably one of the finest poems written in the English language. It has haunted me ever since I read it years back. Perhaps Paradise Lost needs a second reading, but I won't deny that Milton symbolized an era which would be unrecognizable without him.

  14. 5 out of 5

    David Redden

    Beautiful prose, but not really my cup of tea. Paradise Lost is moderately interesting as a period piece. And while I understand that Milton was trying to present a pre-fall picture of innocence and was a creature of his times, I had a hard time not ridiculing the stilted "nobility" of Milton's Adam and his offensively submissive Eve.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Connie

    Well it took me 8 months, but i finally made it through. There is definitely some worthwhile reading in here. I particularly liked Comus and Samson Agonistes. Paradise Lost was a bear to get through. It was interesting and so very different from my LDS view of the fall. Overall i'm glad i read this book. I read the version in volume 4 of the Harvard Classics.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Don Stanton

    Mind broadening, juxtaposition and unparalleled delving into the minds and thoughts of, what we often gloss over, Lucifer and God, concerning heaven and hell, war , struggle, sacrifice, eternal loss and redemption.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Ash Connell

    Milton's poetry is just okay. He's neither inventing a new form like Shakespeare, nor starting a new school of poetry like Donne; and I personally find his commitment to the religious aspect makes many of his sonnets repetitive.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Greg Olear

    They also serve who only stand and waite.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer

    kind of read. i realized i found paradise lost too long the first time around. there are about 150 pages of miscellaneous collected poems i also didn't read. but i read paradise regained for the first time, and that was pretty interesting (and much shorter.) i didn't know that it focuses mainly on the temptation of christ, and that's it!

  20. 4 out of 5

    Maureen

    Not a Milton fan, although I would concede that a well-rounded reader should try this.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Laura

    It took me six years but I finished! Woot doggies. Turns out that Jesus was the good guy all along. I mean, I saw that coming.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Joanna

    OH my God. So painful. I do enjoy his earlier poetry, but Paradise Lost just made my eyes glaze over.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Regina Davidovna

  24. 4 out of 5

    Jessica

  25. 5 out of 5

    Rhonda

  26. 4 out of 5

    Tonya Floyd

  27. 5 out of 5

    Eric Willeforde

  28. 4 out of 5

    Andrea

  29. 4 out of 5

    Hamada Adel

  30. 4 out of 5

    Mary

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.