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Children of Eden (Children of Eden #1)

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What would you do to survive if your very existence were illegal? Rowan is a second child in a world where population control measures make her an outlaw, marked for death. She can never go to school, make friends, or get the eye implants that will mark her as a true member of Eden. Her kaleidoscope eyes will give her away to the ruthless Center government. Outside of Eden, What would you do to survive if your very existence were illegal? Rowan is a second child in a world where population control measures make her an outlaw, marked for death. She can never go to school, make friends, or get the eye implants that will mark her as a true member of Eden. Her kaleidoscope eyes will give her away to the ruthless Center government. Outside of Eden, Earth is poisoned and dead. All animals and most plants have been destroyed by a man-made catastrophe. Long ago, the brilliant scientist Aaron Al-Baz saved a pocket of civilization by designing the EcoPanopticon, a massive computer program that hijacked all global technology and put it to use preserving the last vestiges of mankind. Humans will wait for thousands of years in Eden until the EcoPan heals the world. As an illegal second child, Rowan has been hidden away in her family’s compound for sixteen years. Now, restless and desperate to see the world, she recklessly escapes for what she swears will be only one night of adventure. Though she finds an exotic world, and even a friend, the night leads to tragedy. Soon Rowan becomes a renegade on the run.


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What would you do to survive if your very existence were illegal? Rowan is a second child in a world where population control measures make her an outlaw, marked for death. She can never go to school, make friends, or get the eye implants that will mark her as a true member of Eden. Her kaleidoscope eyes will give her away to the ruthless Center government. Outside of Eden, What would you do to survive if your very existence were illegal? Rowan is a second child in a world where population control measures make her an outlaw, marked for death. She can never go to school, make friends, or get the eye implants that will mark her as a true member of Eden. Her kaleidoscope eyes will give her away to the ruthless Center government. Outside of Eden, Earth is poisoned and dead. All animals and most plants have been destroyed by a man-made catastrophe. Long ago, the brilliant scientist Aaron Al-Baz saved a pocket of civilization by designing the EcoPanopticon, a massive computer program that hijacked all global technology and put it to use preserving the last vestiges of mankind. Humans will wait for thousands of years in Eden until the EcoPan heals the world. As an illegal second child, Rowan has been hidden away in her family’s compound for sixteen years. Now, restless and desperate to see the world, she recklessly escapes for what she swears will be only one night of adventure. Though she finds an exotic world, and even a friend, the night leads to tragedy. Soon Rowan becomes a renegade on the run.

30 review for Children of Eden (Children of Eden #1)

  1. 5 out of 5

    Joshua Gabriel (조수아)

    Warning: this review is going to be very nerdy. Read at your own risk. I am the shameful second child who never should have come into this world at all. —Rowan It's an undeniable truth that dystopian novels have lost their popularity nowadays. The age of The Hunger Games has been over for quite a while now. I myself have been consuming a lot of fantasy and contemporary books, which tend to be more refreshing than their dystopian peers. With that in mind, Children of Eden might just rekindle the w Warning: this review is going to be very nerdy. Read at your own risk. I am the shameful second child who never should have come into this world at all. —Rowan It's an undeniable truth that dystopian novels have lost their popularity nowadays. The age of The Hunger Games has been over for quite a while now. I myself have been consuming a lot of fantasy and contemporary books, which tend to be more refreshing than their dystopian peers. With that in mind, Children of Eden might just rekindle the world's need for dystopian literature. The moment I saw this book on Tasha Polis's BookTube, I wanted to check it out immediately. I honestly did not know anything about Joey Graceffa, but I was intrigued by the idea/reality of a YouTube celebrity writing a legit, dystopian novel. Of course, like most booknerds, I was also beguiled by the gorgeous cover. Still, my expectations were neither high nor low; I merely hoped that my 19 dollars would not go to waste. Now, I am happy to say that I did enjoy Children of Eden. Although it featured a typical, post-apocalyptic dystopia (which hid under the guise of a utopia), I loved Joey Graceffa's application of Post-Structuralism, which is a body of knowledge that analyzes the delineation of surveillance in literature. In more nerdy terms, I was impressed by the author's exploration of the Panopticon, a hypothetical, circular prison wherein an all-knowing and omnipresent entity strips people of their privacy. If we still aren't on the same page, just think about the Big Brother reality show. In Children of Eden, society is governed by an animated form of technology called the EcoPanopticon (EcoPan). This centralized, technological entity is described to be maternal, in that it supposedly provides for the needs of every citizen. Rowan, the protagonist, becomes uncomfortable when she realizes that she can never escape the withering gaze of the EcoPan. This lack of everyday privacy logically prevents her from being herself throughout the novel. It was very easy for me to sympathize with her plight. After all, I myself already find it very difficult to read in libraries which are frustratingly equipped with CCTV cameras. Besides the EcoPan, Rowan also suffers under the surveillance of countless Greenshirts or policemen. Furthermore, since her existence as a second child is forbidden, she is constrained to stay at home, constantly monitored by her paranoid parents. Overall, Rowan is virtually a prisoner in the aforementioned Panopticon, doomed to a life where she can never embrace her own identity. I'm not sure if Joey Graceffa intended his work to be critiqued in such an erudite manner. Nevertheless, I hope that by utilizing literary theories, I have unveiled its beauty. The second thing I loved about this book was its subtle similarity to Red Rising, which is one of my favorite books of all time. Children of Eden also had a major plot twist that boggled my mind to bits. That bomb of a cliff hanger made me want to jump in both ecstasy and disdain. I would not be surprised if Joey Graceffa and Pierce Brown were best friends. I initially intended to give Children of Eden 4 stars because of its academic value, but I suddenly remembered my occasional moments of boredom and drowsiness. Seriously, half of the book is dedicated to world building. Eden is a very complex society, so its history and mechanics are extensively explained to the point that the story becomes uneventful. It's pretty ironic how it took me almost a month to finish such a short novel. All things considered, I applaud Joey Graceffa for doing a job well done. It's not every day that we get to see YouTube stars publish novels that are actually worth our time and money. If you're a helpless nerd like me, you will definitely enjoy this book. Just try your best not to be annoyed by the slow pacing.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Violetta

    Oh boy. Where do I start? First, I was bored out of my mind the entire time I read this. It took me well around four hours to get through the 300 page tome. And I swear, there was a point where I closed the book and just sat there staring out into the void. I'm trying to understand my own dislike. What are my grievances? Why am I being so negative? Well, first, I don't like the writing. I just don't. The fake curse words peppered in throughout were just distracting and took away from the gravity o Oh boy. Where do I start? First, I was bored out of my mind the entire time I read this. It took me well around four hours to get through the 300 page tome. And I swear, there was a point where I closed the book and just sat there staring out into the void. I'm trying to understand my own dislike. What are my grievances? Why am I being so negative? Well, first, I don't like the writing. I just don't. The fake curse words peppered in throughout were just distracting and took away from the gravity of the plot. It became humorous to read the characters exclaiming "bik" or some shit like that during what were meant to be emotionally devastating situations. Second, the plot is generic and formulaic. It seemed as if, instead of letting the characters and plot develop organically through the writing process, the writer(s) decided upon certain elements and wrote around them. For instance, as in many, many, many, many, many YA novels, there is a preoccupation with eyes. In this story, it is a major plot point in which people of Eden get fitted with lenses that make them look "flat," or in other words, generic, normal human eyes. But our unique snowflakes, the second-born, have "kaleidoscope" eyes. Then there is, of course, the government that is lying to everyone. Classic. Then there are the pubescent children who somehow, through great adversity, are able to break into government buildings and take down armed guards. Of course, what's a story without love (or, at the very least, affection) that is immediate and unwarranted. But as a cherry atop this very bland sundae, there's a bisexual love triangle. What really gnaws on me most is that all of this would be fine, if there was some subtlety in the writing. No characters announcing exactly how they feel. No rambling musings of the main character that are so devoid of...ugh, I don't even know what they're devoid of. It's just very amateurish. As much as I wanted to like it, I just couldn't. I understand why stories like this are so popular. It mirrors our fears, our own mistrusts. And, I think, all of us, adults or not, feel powerless against the larger scheme of things. Personally, I feel helpless against injustices, against politicians and corporations who seem to disregard the greater good in exchange for money and power. I mean, if the 4.6 billion year existence of Earth was scaled down to 4 years, humans have only been here for 4 hours. And in 4 hours we've managed to pretty much destroy the planet. So we read stories about teens who live in dystopias and fight for justice to get away from our own dystopia. I get it. I like dystopian fiction for that reason. But I also love literature and language. I like good writing. In the 4 hours humanity has been here, language may be the best thing we've come up with. Language is what helps us persevere against all odds. So, when I read fiction, especially YA books, I become critical. I think we deserve much more than just formulaic stories that are clumsily written, devoid of real-ness and humanity just meant to rake in the big bucks from readers and, yeah, fans. Big picture, the story is intriguing. Yes. I'll give you that. But if the devil's in the details, then this story is the Pope's diary. Yep. I said it. And if that metaphor seems clumsy to you, because it is, then you know what you have waiting for you between the pages of The Children of Eden. Good luck.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Mlpmom (Book Reviewer)

    3.5 Stars! I wasn't familiar with the author in any capacity, either as an author of his biography last year or a “YouTube sensation” instead, I picked this up based on the intriguing synopsis and the allure of the cover. And while I wouldn't say this was a completely original story line, it did have some originality and it was a very entertaining one that had small twists and turns throughout the story that kept me on my toes and turning the pages. Set in a dystopian world that was every bit as 3.5 Stars! I wasn't familiar with the author in any capacity, either as an author of his biography last year or a “YouTube sensation” instead, I picked this up based on the intriguing synopsis and the allure of the cover. And while I wouldn't say this was a completely original story line, it did have some originality and it was a very entertaining one that had small twists and turns throughout the story that kept me on my toes and turning the pages. Set in a dystopian world that was every bit as believable as it was easy to imagine, it didn't take me long to get pulled into the story and become curious about the new world and Eden itself. Filled with what if's and questions, this story was intriguing and kept me interested until the very end. And while not all my questions were answered and not everything explained, I am hoping that they will be in the next books to come. Overall this was a fun story that was too far fetched or imagined and one that I think fans of the genre and Joey himself, will enjoy. *ARC copy provided by the publisher in exchange for an honest review.*

  4. 4 out of 5

    Jeff

    Has anyone read this?? The author is an amazing YouTuber so yah, definitely interested XD

  5. 4 out of 5

    Kassidy

    *3.5* I enjoyed the characters, but the world and plot were a little strange, especially toward the end.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Taylor Knight

    I received an unsolicited copy of this book from the publisher. This does not affect my opinion of this book in any way. I'm not very familiar with Joey Graceffa other than I know he's a Youtuber. I haven't found a fictional book written a Youtuber, celebrity, or athlete that I was impressed by so I didn't have very high hopes for Children of Eden. This book isn't bad by any means but it was exactly what I was expecting. It was okay. It was a nice book but not all that remarkable, in my opinion. I received an unsolicited copy of this book from the publisher. This does not affect my opinion of this book in any way. I'm not very familiar with Joey Graceffa other than I know he's a Youtuber. I haven't found a fictional book written a Youtuber, celebrity, or athlete that I was impressed by so I didn't have very high hopes for Children of Eden. This book isn't bad by any means but it was exactly what I was expecting. It was okay. It was a nice book but not all that remarkable, in my opinion. I liked the concept of the book, I thought that was original and creative, but everything else was pretty basic. The writing style seemed inexperienced and the characters were a bit plain. Overall, if you're a big fan of Joey, I think this book is worth buying. It's not bad and if you're not a very critical reader, I think you might like this book. But if you're looking for an amazing read, I don't think book is it.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Suzanne

    This was a fascinating story. The idea of second children being illegal to have made for an interesting story. I know China had a one-child policy (with some exceptions) for a couple decades for population planning, but the idea still seems dystopia like so Graceffa adding the plot of the living things on Earth having been destroyed a couple hundred years ago really made for an fascinating reading experience. I really enjoyed this book a lot more than I expected.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Whitney Milam

    GET EXCITED FOR THIS!! Joey’s expansive imagination is put to full use in this novel, which is full of such interesting ideas, important themes, and compelling characters that I can’t wait for the rest of the world to fall in love with.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Dejanira Dawn

    I don't understand why people think Youtubers can't write books. Being a fan of Joey's since I first started watching youtube, I can honestly say I'm excited for this book! It seems really interesting! Most youtubers write about themselves, only a few haven't and I really enjoyed those ones so far.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Silke

    I f*cking get it!! Eyes are special! Why the hell does every book feel the need to tell me that?! (for the actual book review skip the next 2 paragraphs) I heard that this Youtuber wrote a dystopian YA novel and that's my favorite genre, so guess what! I decided to check him out before picking up the book. From the first ten minutes of looking at his social media accounts and especially his Youtube channel I concluded that he is obsessed with 3 things: iridescent things, crystals and eyes. After t I f*cking get it!! Eyes are special! Why the hell does every book feel the need to tell me that?! (for the actual book review skip the next 2 paragraphs) I heard that this Youtuber wrote a dystopian YA novel and that's my favorite genre, so guess what! I decided to check him out before picking up the book. From the first ten minutes of looking at his social media accounts and especially his Youtube channel I concluded that he is obsessed with 3 things: iridescent things, crystals and eyes. After that I went on goodreads to check out the reviews and that's when I first got really frustrated with everything. Thousands of young teenage girls gave the book a 5 star review even though they didn't even read the book! As far as I can tell (from the Twitter handles in the reviews) he told his viewers to leave a review and he would go on a following spree and I HATE THAT SH*T!! Go do that somewhere else and not where people trying to legit decide if they're gonna pick up a book or not! After quite some consideration, I decided to pick up the book nonetheless an you see... it's not that good. Don't get me wrong, I really wanted to like the book, I read genuine reviews that told me I would love it, even the not so good reviews that that the book is still decent, but I just don't think so. It's simply not well written, the story has few nice twists but is unoriginal in itself. What I like about it: The world he created is believable and plausible, at least to some extent. It has a corrupt society and when you look at recent events (I'm writing that on 11.10) we have that, too. There's an underground that wants to rebel and all that jazz that I like in a good dystopian novel. It was really promising at first. I also liked the characters (again, to some extent), and the themes in the book are interesting. But here's the thing, if you keep every aspect of the modern-day English language, why do you feel the desperate need to give this society different swear words? Were you that concerened about your young audience reading the story and that it could be inappropriate for them to read f*ck? Why wouldn't you just let them sewar normally? And YES! This really bothered me, because he didn't change anything else in the language and that makes it unbelievable and flat out stupid. Also you can't recognize the swear words as such, they just sound like any other word that they say, only that you don't recognize it. The other thing is that my thought while reading this was mostly "why?", and not because I wanted to know how the story goes on, but I rather wanted to know why the characters acted as stupid as they did. Next on my list is: if you tease me with the gay and instead I get a bisexual love triangle, I will get very upset. I seriously hate love triangles, that sh*t is done man, it's overused and boring. (view spoiler)[ though it was a nice twist that she didn't end up with neither, so kudos for that. (hide spoiler)] I'm so over love triangles, so when this one started I was audibly groaning in frustration. Oh, you're still asking yourself why I brought up that I looked him up and what I saw when I did so? Let me explain: Everything I mentioned that he's obsessed with (if you skipped that: iridescent stuff, crystals and eyes) plays a big role in the book. All I could think was "seriously? I know the 'author' for ten minutes and he brings up everything I know about him. How original! " Seriously, every story has something from the author in it, you can think that it doesn't, but I talked to enough authors to know that it really does, but this is too much! And this annoyed the sh*t out of me. Especially since I'm so annoyed that eyes always have to have this special meaning, in every freaking book and this just takes the cake! I don't think they make a good plot point in the story. Sure they give you more suspense and apparently make things more interesting, but it just didn't do that for me. I thought it was exasperatedly unnecessary. Can we make like a petition to stop romanticising eyes? I love my girlfriend's eyes, too, but I don't have to put them on a pedestal. Don't even get me started on the ending. I hated it, I honestly hated it so much, I couldn't stand it. It was unsatisfactory for the plot and dude, did you come up with that while you were high or something? I'm so over this book. I really liked the beginning, and I was curious where he was going with it, but it got boring so fast and by the end I was exasperated and annoyed and I was glad that it ended. I can understand how people like it, I just didn't.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Martyna

    Okay, so first let me get one thing straight. I was asked to review this book for a publisher house back in my home country. Beforehand, I had no bloody idea who Joey Graceffa was. And to be honest, I couldn't care less whether he wrote it himself or not. Even if he only supplied his ideas and someone else corrected it - I don't care. Because this book is BLOODY BRILLIANT. Sure, it might be using some common ideas from books like Declaration, Divergent, or the Hunger Games. But there's much more Okay, so first let me get one thing straight. I was asked to review this book for a publisher house back in my home country. Beforehand, I had no bloody idea who Joey Graceffa was. And to be honest, I couldn't care less whether he wrote it himself or not. Even if he only supplied his ideas and someone else corrected it - I don't care. Because this book is BLOODY BRILLIANT. Sure, it might be using some common ideas from books like Declaration, Divergent, or the Hunger Games. But there's much more to "Children of Eden". The dystopian world presented here where the humans destroyed the environment to the extent that only a small group remained is so real, so plausible, that I would like to tell other dystopian authors: "See? That's how a realistic dystopian society should be built" *cough* Veronica Roth *cough* Sure, there are some things that left me going "wait whaaat that doesn't make sense" but they were either explained shortly afterwards or I hope they'll be explained in the following books (because there will be more books, right? RIGHT? this ended in such a cliffhanger that it simply cannot be a standalone novel!!!!! I need the sequel, like, NOW). I am amazed at the way the world was constructed in this book, I adored the characters, and I simply couldn't tear myself away until the very end! The book starts off slowly, but even then it's interesting - the slow introduction lets us get to know Eden better. Somewhere halfway through, the plot speeds up, and speeds up, and speeds up... AND THEN IT STOPS. Please it can't end like this. It just can't. PS: I wasn't expecting to enjoy this book so much. I really wasn't. It's just so fun to read.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Anastasia シ

    Full Review on my blog! I used to watch Joey, since he’s had 100k subscribers, but now I hardly even watch YouTube. I had seen Children of Eden the video he posted, and the synopsis sounded interesting enough that I eventually picked it up. There are two things that should be noted about this book before picking it up. The first being that it isn’t written solely by Joey. I know there is no indication on the cover, it clearly states on the title page that it was written with Laura L. Sullivan. An Full Review on my blog! I used to watch Joey, since he’s had 100k subscribers, but now I hardly even watch YouTube. I had seen Children of Eden the video he posted, and the synopsis sounded interesting enough that I eventually picked it up. There are two things that should be noted about this book before picking it up. The first being that it isn’t written solely by Joey. I know there is no indication on the cover, it clearly states on the title page that it was written with Laura L. Sullivan. And the second thing, while this book is ostensibly a standalone, it really is not. The story does not end with any kind of resolution and actually leaves more questions than have been answered. I know there is a second book that was released a few months ago, whether I read it, is the question.. “But alone is good. Alone is safe.” Children of Eden is a dystopian novel, set in a post-apocalyptic world where the sole survivors of Earth now live in Eden, where everything is regulated, including the human population. Each family is only allowed to have one child, in order to preserve the little amounts of food that exists in Eden. Second Children are illegal and are usually killed before they are even born. Those who have been hidden away in secret by their families, usually live a life of imprisonment and are not able to live a normal life, unless they are able to obtain black market lenses that are used for identification, and assume a new identity. Rowan is a Second Child and comes from a well-respected family who have the means to buy her a pair of lenses and a new identity. However, having this new identity and freedom means that she can never see her family again. When Rowan learns about this, she has her first act of rebellion and escapes from her house for a night. There she meets a friend but this taste of freedom leads to dangerous and tragic consequences. Soon, she finds herself on the run from the Greenshirts and meets other Second Children along the way. “For a second I marvel at the technology humans can create. How did we get to be so powerful, but so destructive? With so much intelligence, couldn’t we see the point past which one begets the other? I have mixed feelings on the writing. While most of the writing was good and much better than I had expected going into the book. I liked the world in this book a lot. It was well conceptualized and nicely described. But there was too much focus on World-Building, I felt like the there was hardly any character building… In my opinion it seemed as if, instead of letting the characters and plot develop organically through the writing process, the writers decided upon certain elements and wrote around them. Like in many, many, many other YA novels, there is a preoccupation with eyes. A major plot point in this story is the people of Eden get fitted with “kaleidoscope” lenses that make them look “flat”. Then, of course, the government that is lying to everyone. Classic. And before I forget to mention the pubescent children who somehow are able to break into government buildings and take down armed guards. Another Classic! AND Of course, what’s a story without love/affection? Love that is immediate and unwarranted. Also, a love triangle…but not any love triangle; a bisexual love triangle. Which was cute and all, BUT DEVELOPED WAYY TOOO FAST… like unbelievably fast, and it felt extremely forced… I felt like there wasn’t much leading up to the ‘love’ part…. it was basically, from the moment of actually meeting Lark … ‘Lark, Lark, Lark, Lark, Lark, Lark,” I thought, “I wonder what Lark is doing, etc” (not a quote from the book, just my way of looking at the insant love)… Mehh… “Lark rolls toward me, propping herself up on her elbow. She looks into my eyes and says solemnly, “I chose you.” Then, slowly, she bends until her lips touch mine. Her lilac hair tumbles over us, and though it I can see the stars shining. Oh Earth, they’re spinning! They’re dancing…” I wouldn’t say this was a completely original story line, it did have some originality and it was entertaining at times. I thought it included some interesting elements, small twists and turns throughout the story that kind of kept me on my toes and turning the pages. But it’s definitely similar to other worlds that I’ve read about before. Having said that, I do think that too much of the book was dedicated to the world building and there wasn’t a lot of anything else in the novel. One thing that was distracting and took away from the gravity of the plot was the fake curse words that peppered in throughout the book… I felt like the fake curse words were a bit stupid and very unrealistic. Though it became humorous to read the characters exclaiming “bik” or whatever like that during what were meant to be emotionally devastating situations… Yeah very unrealistic… This was one of the reasons why I’m rating this a 3.5 … All problems aside, the story is intriguing, and I really did enjoy this book. It was an easy, quick read that was kinda fun. I think this is the first and last book of Joey’s I’ll ever review. Also, I’m not sure if I’ll read the next book in the series. I recommend it to those of you that like typical YA dystioian books. 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  13. 4 out of 5

    Liveta

    Distopines knygas labai mėgstu, esu ne vieną tokią skaičiusi. Žinoma, kartais tas siužetas šiek tiek kartojasi, galima rasti panašumų, tačiau vis tiek kiekviena knyga turi pasakyti ir šį tą naujo. Galiu pasakyti, kad man patiko 80% knygos. Likusieji 20% buvo gana nuspėjami ir šiek tiek erzino. Kiekvieną kartą juokiausi perskaičiusi vertėjo pasirinktą vertimo variantą, žodį ‘‘manding‘‘, pirmą kartą tokį mačiau ir girdėjau, jis kartojosi labai dažnai, todėl pradėjo šiek tiek įkyrėti. Žinoma labai Distopines knygas labai mėgstu, esu ne vieną tokią skaičiusi. Žinoma, kartais tas siužetas šiek tiek kartojasi, galima rasti panašumų, tačiau vis tiek kiekviena knyga turi pasakyti ir šį tą naujo. Galiu pasakyti, kad man patiko 80% knygos. Likusieji 20% buvo gana nuspėjami ir šiek tiek erzino. Kiekvieną kartą juokiausi perskaičiusi vertėjo pasirinktą vertimo variantą, žodį ‘‘manding‘‘, pirmą kartą tokį mačiau ir girdėjau, jis kartojosi labai dažnai, todėl pradėjo šiek tiek įkyrėti. Žinoma labai laukiau romantiškosios dalies, ar bus meilės linija, ji buvo, bet gana keista. Negaliu teigti, kad man ji patiko ir teko šiek tiek nusivilti.Tačiau veiksmo knygoje tikrai netrūksta, čia kiekviename skyriuje jo labai daug, todėl beskaitant nėra kada nuobodžiauti, o ta veiksmų seka man nei kiek neprailgo. Knygos pabaiga gerokai nustebino, ją perskaičiusi nežinojau ką ir galvoti, ji paliko dar daugiau klausimų nei buvo prieš tai atsakyta, todėl labai laukiu atrosios knygos dalies, manau, kad ji turėtų būti dar geresnė! Man, kaip neišrankiai skaitytojai, knyga tikrai labai patiko, o tie keli išvardyti munusai nenumušė noro mėgautis knyga. Knygai duočiau 3,5, bet pagal goodreads vertinimo skalę duodu 4.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Montzalee Wittmann

    I think it was a good ya book, a dystopian novel Although I don't like those kind I wanted to see what this book was about since it was making waves Rtc

  15. 4 out of 5

    Evaguelis

    3.5 I have some serious eye envy stars! MY VIDEO REVIEW AND BOOK TALK CAN BE FOUND HERE Now, now, let me be clear and upfront. I know who Joey Graceffa is. HOWEVER, I did not let that influence me either positively or negatively as I read this book. I tried to remain as neutral as possible. Are my keyword warriors appeased? Ok, moving on! This book is set in the dystopian world of Eden where people live in different circles based on their social standing while they wait for the world to heal it 3.5 I have some serious eye envy stars! MY VIDEO REVIEW AND BOOK TALK CAN BE FOUND HERE Now, now, let me be clear and upfront. I know who Joey Graceffa is. HOWEVER, I did not let that influence me either positively or negatively as I read this book. I tried to remain as neutral as possible. Are my keyword warriors appeased? Ok, moving on! This book is set in the dystopian world of Eden where people live in different circles based on their social standing while they wait for the world to heal itself after the ecosystem failed. The protagonist of this story is Rowan a second child marked by her peculiar eyes, that has only lived in hiding surrounded by walls because it is illegal for couples to have more than one child. We follow her as she discovers the world for the first time along with the beauty, danger, and lies that encompasses their existence. Ok, so basically ANOTHER dystopian novel….great. Well, yes, me who typed that first sentence, you look good today by the way. However, the world itself, had some very interesting aspects like Bestial people….IS NOT THAT. STOP IT! Plus, the concept of the eyes humans are originally born with seems unique and a great addition to the story. Lastly, it does communicate a great message which is the importance to take care of our planet and the real serious threat of global warming. No Trump, it wasn’t invented by the Chinese. So…why the 3.5 stars? Well…me again, there were some things that could have been improved upon. For example, the writing was fast paced and not verbose WHICH IS SOMETHING I APPRECIATED AND ENJOYED. However, I feel like he just kept telling us stuff instead of showing us. Let the readers make assumptions. That’s what “reading in between the lines” came from….you know books…cause in between the lines…YOU KNOW WHAT I MEAN! Additionally, while I enjoyed the main protagonist, Rowan…kinda had a girl crush on her in a weird way. Some of the other characters just fell flat. They really weren’t fleshed out and were there simply to move the plot along. Now, that that’s out of the way, I still did enjoy the book it was entertaining. Now, TRIGGER WARNING, for those who DO NOT enjoy love triangles…this book has a love triangle. Ok? It’s out there, you have been warned. I for one, do not enjoy love triangles but for some reason, I am interested in this one. Maybe because the two love interest are NOTHING like I have seen before in a love triangle. I can’t say why because this is a spoiler free review, but just know it’s not your typical love triangle. All in all, it was an entertaining read. I think Joey will keep growing as a writer and will learn to flesh out character and become more versed in writing for storytelling purposes. I think you should give this book a shot and simply forget he is a youtuber because it was surprisingly good. -*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*- FOLLOW ME ....maybe? (HA! SEE WHAT I DID THERE? Call me maybe?...NO? *sighs*) YOUTUBE INSTAGRAM TWITTER -*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-

  16. 4 out of 5

    Elizabeth

    I really enjoyed the premise of this book. The characters develop in interesting ways, and if I'm not mistaken, I think the main character might be bi? I'm not against this storyline, I actually like how it emphasizes that she hasn't been shaped by society since she was kept away from it for so long. But I might be reading too much into that part. Either way, I can't wait to read the next in the series.

  17. 4 out of 5

    ℓуηη, ℓσкιѕℓутнєя¢ℓαω

    *Disclaimer!!!* This will not be a popular review/rant, so keep scrolling if you loved it I was really looking forward to this book when it first came out. So I finally got my hands on a copy of it this month hoping it would be as good as it sounded. But ya know what?? You just can't listen to hype, or trust synopses anymore. You just CAN'T. I was just SO friggin' disappointed with this book!!! I had to actually make a DNF shelf for the first DNF book I've had in like forever! I persisted through *Disclaimer!!!* This will not be a popular review/rant, so keep scrolling if you loved it I was really looking forward to this book when it first came out. So I finally got my hands on a copy of it this month hoping it would be as good as it sounded. But ya know what?? You just can't listen to hype, or trust synopses anymore. You just CAN'T. I was just SO friggin' disappointed with this book!!! I had to actually make a DNF shelf for the first DNF book I've had in like forever! I persisted through a boringly popular 690+ page book last year, but this 270+ defeated me. It was THAT boring. Like SO boring. I stubbornly kept trying to pick it up and continue and I just bloody hell couldn't!!!!!!! The plot starts out sooooooo damn slowly, and never really picked up at all, at least as far as I got with it (which was sadly only a measly 73 pages. It was ALL I could do!!! D: And that seriously pisses me off). The characters are COMPLETELY flat, with no personality or nothing. Just plain nothing! Rowan describes her brother as "sensitive" and something else. I never got a single vibe of anything from him. He was just a body saying words as far as I could tell. It was like the character had gone through a friggin' lobotomy! Seriously, the average androids have more personality and humanity than this kid. And his telling Rowan she's tough & brave. Ehhhhh. I didn't see it. I felt ever so slightly sorry for her, but that's as much as I could muster. You just couldn't FEEL for these characters they were so under-cooked!!! And like I said, that plot...And the writing was just ehhhh...Publicists do a friggin' amazing job is all I can say. 'Cause they made this sound like an almost promising dystopian read, which you and I both know is kinda hard to find amongst all the Hunger Games and Divergent knockoffs. And now for this last point, and I'll get off my soap box. Promise. I'm probably the only one who took it this way, but I DO NOT like, nor appreciate books that preach someone's opinion at you. I don't know a damn thing about this author. I've never read anything about him, never watched his vlogs, youtubes, whatever, nor am I going to at this point. Now I may be wrong in my assumptions after what I've read of this book, but the opinions in this book come across as more personal by nature to the author than actually something to move the story along. This book just seemed to me to be more like the author's own soap box to spout their opinions. And I did NOT like it one bit. And like I said, I'm probably the only person who took the book (heh, part of the book) that way, so I won't even go into it any further. Suffice it to say, lots of people seem to like this book. I am not one of those people. Period. First book I've had to mark DNF in years. Thanks Graceffa. You beat me. /end rant

  18. 4 out of 5

    Murf the Surf

    Rowans adventure in the Eden How would you describe this eden if you'd lived there? Its a bit small, but large enough for Rowan to remain undetected as a second child in a futuristic utopian world. I'd followed her on her escape to meet Lochlan, another second child man who has some pretty cool altruistic and atavistic traits of loyalty and nobleness. The two soon bond and go on some pretty amazing adventures, like rescuing her brother Ash. Outside of Eden, Earth is poisoned and dead. All animals Rowans adventure in the Eden How would you describe this eden if you'd lived there? Its a bit small, but large enough for Rowan to remain undetected as a second child in a futuristic utopian world. I'd followed her on her escape to meet Lochlan, another second child man who has some pretty cool altruistic and atavistic traits of loyalty and nobleness. The two soon bond and go on some pretty amazing adventures, like rescuing her brother Ash. Outside of Eden, Earth is poisoned and dead. All animals and most plants have been destroyed by a man-made catastrophe. Long ago, the brilliant scientist Aaron Al-Baz saved a pocket of civilization by designing the EcoPanopticon, a massive computer program that hijacked all global technology and put it to use preserving the last vestiges of mankind. Humans will wait for thousands of years in Eden until the EcoPan heals the world. The sexuality is rather intriguing in this YA tales as Rowan first kisses her gal pal Lark and likes it quite acutely. However when around Lochlan her girl pheromes go ballistic. I think someone is long over due to experience sexuality. This story is kept quite clean though as this girl on girl action never goes beyond sleeping together and kissing. Being a gay man myself it nice to see gender roles relaxed more in the future, when youth are free to explore their emotions and feelings for one another. One of the most unexplained aspects of the book I'd asked myself, was why didn't they just have ID cards or badges? The need for eye implants seemed a little like tagging a dog under the ear. Maybe it will come up later how this helps identify one better. Do you all remember a Dan Brown novel where a scientists eye ball was removed in order to get into a high level CERN facility? I rest my case.....hmmmmm.... All in all, this is book one in a series that has only begun. Your truly , Murf

  19. 4 out of 5

    Nora|KnyguDama

    Visi jau žinot jog paauglių literatūrą labai mėgstu. Man patinka ir meilės romanai, ir mokylinės dramos, ir tos populiariosios distopijos. Na, žinot: pasaulis griūva, o vaikai viską gelbėja. Esu skaičiusi ir gerų, net labai gerų, ir visai nuviliančių. Po "Bado žaidynių" sėkmės siužetai ėmė dažnai kartotis ir vis labiau panašėti. Ir Joey Graceffa į šį ratą papuolė: akivaizdu, jog būtent garsioji trilogiją jį įkvėpė parašyti "Edeno vaikų" seriją. Pasaulis pasikeitė, visko trūksta, tad imamasi grie Visi jau žinot jog paauglių literatūrą labai mėgstu. Man patinka ir meilės romanai, ir mokylinės dramos, ir tos populiariosios distopijos. Na, žinot: pasaulis griūva, o vaikai viską gelbėja. Esu skaičiusi ir gerų, net labai gerų, ir visai nuviliančių. Po "Bado žaidynių" sėkmės siužetai ėmė dažnai kartotis ir vis labiau panašėti. Ir Joey Graceffa į šį ratą papuolė: akivaizdu, jog būtent garsioji trilogiją jį įkvėpė parašyti "Edeno vaikų" seriją. Pasaulis pasikeitė, visko trūksta, tad imamasi griežčiausių priemonių tvarkai palaikyti. Veikėjų charakteriai, meilės, gelbėjimo planai ir "blogiečiai" - viskas savo nuotaika ir emocija labai priminė "Bado žaidynes" su žiupsneliu "Sielonešės". Prieš du šimtus metų įvyko ekologinė katastrofa: išnyko visi augalai, visi gyvūnai. Liko tik saujelė išrinktųjų. Išliko jie tik Arono Al Bazo dėka. Pastarasis sukūrė Ekopaną - sistemą padėjusią išlikti tai saujelei žmonių, bei miestą Edeną, kuriame jie ir gyvena. Edene ištekliai labai riboti - viskas yra perdirbama. Net meniausios šiukšlės, plaukai, plastmasė tampa maistu, daiktais ar drabužiais. Dėl tokio ribotumo, ribojamos ir šeimos: visi gali turėti tik po vieną vaiką. Tik pirmagimiai čia gali tapti pilnaverčiais žmonėmis. Visi žmonės Edene privalo turėti specialius, implantuotus akių lęšius, kad žaliamarškiniai ir įvairūs patruliuojantys robotai galėtų patikrinti gyventojų tapatybę. Rovena ir Ešas - dvyniai. Tačiau Ešas yra pirmagimis, o Rovena gimė antra. Jų mama griežtai atsisakė atiduoti Roveną ir slapta pagimdžiusi vaikus, mergaitę paslėpė. Ir taip jau septyniolika metų Rovena gyvena slapstydamasi dideliame šeimos name... Kaskart grįžęs iš mokyjlos Ešas jai smulkiai papasakoja savo dieną, ką matė, ką valgė, ką veikė jo klasės draugai. Rovena niekada nėra mačiusi gatvių, kitų žmonių, dirbtinų medžių. Kartą, pavargusi nuo tokio gyvenimo ji nusprendžia sprukti iš namų. Slėpdama akis, ji neria į minią žmonių ir pirmą kartą pamato Edeną. Tačiau toks poelgis nelieka be pasekmių. Valdžia ima ją persekioti. Skaitydama "Edeno vaikus" jaučiausi lyg skaitydama knygą jau kokį ketvirtą kartą - viskas buvo labai panašu į kitas skaitytas paauglių distopijas. Rašymo stilius ir įvykių eiga, nors jau "ragauta" - blogi nebuvo. Labai greitai ir lengvai viskas susiskaitė. Žinoma, originalumu kūrinys netryško, tačiau patiko ekologinės katastrofos idėja. Išsamiai aprašya kodėl taip įvyko, ką žmonija darė (ir daro) ne taip: besaikis vartojimas, gamtos išteklių nakinimas, absoliuti. nepagarba augmenijai ir gyvūnijai. Šie ir dar daugiau faktorių privedė prie Edeno ir Ekopano. Graži mintis jauniems žmonėms per populiariąją literatūrą perduoti tikrai svarbią žinutę. Viską susumavus,tai nebloga knyga paaugliams, viet

  20. 5 out of 5

    Camille Dent

    **3.5 First of all, this book is not particularly well-written. It's pretty informal prose with lots of questions along the lines of "Who is this guy? I think I've seen him before. Could it mean something that we keep running into each other? Can I trust him?" and made up cuss words with no explanation or hints to indicate whether they speak a new language completely in this dystopian society or if cuss words are the only part of vernacular speech that have changed for some reason. Just like ever **3.5 First of all, this book is not particularly well-written. It's pretty informal prose with lots of questions along the lines of "Who is this guy? I think I've seen him before. Could it mean something that we keep running into each other? Can I trust him?" and made up cuss words with no explanation or hints to indicate whether they speak a new language completely in this dystopian society or if cuss words are the only part of vernacular speech that have changed for some reason. Just like every other dystopian society, there is a powerful aristocrat class, a government with secrets, an oppressed lower class, and a rebel group that the protagonist inevitably joins and finds love in. However, in my opinion, the story-telling outweighs the unimpressive writing. I really enjoyed the multi-layered development of all prominent characters. I also appreciated seeing a bisexual love triangle for once! I liked how no one questions the legitimacy of Rowan's attraction to both genders, not even Rowan herself despite her sheltered upbringing, so at least this regressed society has advanced in normalizing LGBT equality. And though not ideal, I think her sheltered childhood more than justifies the instalove. I also liked how the love triangle isn't as imposing as they usually are. It creates minimal tension, but all of the characters involved actually have pretty straight priorities. The world is interesting, and the story ultimately ends with more new questions opened than old questions answered. This could be interpreted as a more philosophical Shutter-Island-ending or a cliffhanger for a sequel. Either way, the lack of giving and sort of resolve to the biggest plot points, even implicative or speculative resolve, was annoying. Ultimately, the plot is entertaining, and there is some interesting, though not revolutionary, discussion about relevant issues.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Brad

    Children of Eden by Joey Graceffa is another YA dystopian story. Rowan is a 2nd child and not allowed in Eden. Her parents have hidden her for all of her 16 years. Now they have a plan to insert her into society but someone betrays them. Now Rowan is on the run discovers some of Eden's secrets. If you saw Aeon Flux, then you know the setup for this book. Humans live behind a wall until the Earth heals. There is little originality in the story. To me it read like a middle school English project. Children of Eden by Joey Graceffa is another YA dystopian story. Rowan is a 2nd child and not allowed in Eden. Her parents have hidden her for all of her 16 years. Now they have a plan to insert her into society but someone betrays them. Now Rowan is on the run discovers some of Eden's secrets. If you saw Aeon Flux, then you know the setup for this book. Humans live behind a wall until the Earth heals. There is little originality in the story. To me it read like a middle school English project. (No offense to any middle schoolers- I'm sure your work is fine) Sometimes I can't tell if the author is trying to tell a story or make some comment about Man's place in the environment. This book did not work for me. If your jam is YA dystopian fiction it may for you if your expectations are low.

  22. 5 out of 5

    James Joyce

    First, I read this because my niece asked me to. She wanted to get my feeling about the book. Okay. Luckily, she wasn't ecstatic about the book, herself. And I'll admit that I'm not a big fan of a lot of things that are standard, in YA writing. So take my comments as you will. Second, the only (minor) spoiler is hidden in a "spoiler" link. And it only spoils something from the first bit of the book. Graceffa has potential. I say that because I didn't just give up on the book, even though it was co First, I read this because my niece asked me to. She wanted to get my feeling about the book. Okay. Luckily, she wasn't ecstatic about the book, herself. And I'll admit that I'm not a big fan of a lot of things that are standard, in YA writing. So take my comments as you will. Second, the only (minor) spoiler is hidden in a "spoiler" link. And it only spoils something from the first bit of the book. Graceffa has potential. I say that because I didn't just give up on the book, even though it was continually annoying. There's a... likability to his writing style. I can't quite identify what it is, but it wasn't enough to make me want to follow his career. In a nutshell, this story is about Rowan, a teen girl and second child, in a post-apocalyptic society that terminates second children. She "shouldn't exist". She is illegal, kept hidden. Of course, the society is secretly dystopian and she somehow ends up in the middle of the whole rebellion thing. Wait... did I say "middle"? No, she's on the coattails/head of it all. As in, she does stupid things which thrust her into the limelight, storywise, then just gets dragged through most of it... or runs through (she really likes to run) most of it. And she really doesn't understand what's going on, pretty much ever. Some issues I had: Characters have no set personality/skillset.They're just whatever the story needs them to be, at that moment. Rowan has spent her entire life with only her father, mother, and brother, yet she has major social skills... when the story needs her to. And she has an amazing ability to parse social cues, without any experience in social settings. Like noticing slight pauses and precisely identifying what they mean. Rowan's understanding of things seems impossible without a greater knowledge of prefail (contemporary) Earth than she has. She gets injured, at one point. A sprain bad enough to cause noticeable swelling around the ankle. And it hurts and slows her down, as it should. Except when the story needs her to start running again and the sprain isn't mentioned, until later. Suddenly it's such a bad sprain that she has to hold back a scream. Then it's no big deal, again. In all such instances, it was only mentioned when the author needed to slow her down or rig up some tension/suspense. Manufactured Suspense: The Backpack. Just before Rowan goes on the run, for her life, her mother packs her backpack, so Rowan has no idea what's been packed. And her mother tells her that she's packed a secret, too. (view spoiler)[Mom dies. (hide spoiler)] Anyway... Rowan runs, hides, has this experience and that, has a nap or two... basically, she spends a lot of downtime and otherwise kicks around without looking into the backpack. She thinks about it.(suspense) The author mentions it.(oooh, suspense) And the reader is left to wonder what important thing is in the backpack. I won't tell you, but it makes no frigging sense. That it exists makes sense, but that her mother gave it as a surprise doesn't. And this whole rigamarole is used to manufacture suspense when there isn't any, mainly because the story has no real goal. EcoPan and Eyeballs. The EcoPan (an all-seeing AI computer system that runs everything) has data based on implanted retinas that all citizens have. Yet there's a whole bunch of nonsense suspense built around a pass card that shouldn't exist. When your eyeballs contain everything from your physical description to your banking details, you don't need no stinking pass cards. It probably comes as no surprise that my final comment is that the world, itself, makes no sense. It's just various bit and pieces, stuck together and given Frankenstein life. Yick. Sorry, Joey.You need a serious mentor or editor. Maybe a bunch of Alpha Readers. And, hopefully, the humility to take their advice. I gave it 2 stars, instead of 1, because there's something likeable about it. Like a fugly kid sister, or something.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Dove

    HOLYYYYYYY. MAN I'VE READ A LOT OF DYSTOPIC NOVELS IN MY LIFETIME (THROWBACK TO MY MIDDLE SCHOOL OBSESSION WITH DYSTOPIA) AND THIS BOOK IS NOTHING LIKE ANY OF THOSE BOOKS I'VE READ BEFORE. SURE, IT HAS THE SAME CONCEPTS OF A TYPICAL DYSTOPIC NOVEL, BUT IT WAS SOMETHING NEW- SOMETHING EXTRAORDINARY. IT WAS TRULY OUT OF THIS WORLD. I could not stop thinking about this book, nor could I put it down. I just wanted to keep reading. It was intense, man. Like what even. It was so cool, such a unique id HOLYYYYYYY. MAN I'VE READ A LOT OF DYSTOPIC NOVELS IN MY LIFETIME (THROWBACK TO MY MIDDLE SCHOOL OBSESSION WITH DYSTOPIA) AND THIS BOOK IS NOTHING LIKE ANY OF THOSE BOOKS I'VE READ BEFORE. SURE, IT HAS THE SAME CONCEPTS OF A TYPICAL DYSTOPIC NOVEL, BUT IT WAS SOMETHING NEW- SOMETHING EXTRAORDINARY. IT WAS TRULY OUT OF THIS WORLD. I could not stop thinking about this book, nor could I put it down. I just wanted to keep reading. It was intense, man. Like what even. It was so cool, such a unique idea. Basically, in the future, humans destroyed the earth so this one guy decided to make something to save some part of humanity and it was this Ecopan. Basically, it was an artificial environment that protects humans from the outside atmosphere and it's self sustaining. There's artificial food and stuff and humans can survive. However, in order to continue sustaining themselves, there can only be one child per family. Now, obviously there's some secret second children who spend their lives hiding out. Oh and everything in the Ecopan is connected through your eyes cuz everyone has these special lenses. There's a black market where second children can get fake lenses to fit in and live with a second family. There's also a division. The richer people live in the centre and the poor people live outside. However, the guy who created the Ecopan basically wanted humans to survive and so he wanted everyone within the Ecopan to live equally and happy so the main character Rowan starts to question the righteousness of this Ecopan because there shouldn't be poor people. Plus, there's an uneven distribution of food, wealth, jobs, etc. Also, digging deeper into the centre and food production, you can see there's a lot off and the centre is turning corrupt. There's also this underground where second children live, several rebellion groups, and forests and deserts outside the Ecopan that may or may not exist. The book follows Rowan, her life a second child, and the dark twists and turns in this so-called 'utopia.' I found it especially incredible because it was such a layered novel and I liked the concept of "Humans always have a way of screwing up everything. Even stuff that's supposed to be self-sustaining and perfect. Like, honestly, humans are so dumb." I also really liked how they were talking about Earth and said, "Nature gives life. Nature takes life. And what are humans, besides nature?" I thought a lot of the points they made are really thought-provoking, especially the point how Earth always has a way of reviving itself (i.e dinosaurs, atomic bombs) and that nature is a beautiful but mysterious thing. Just everything fit together perfectly and it really made us think about the modern world because they talk about what humans are currently doing and how it's negatively impacting Earth in the long-run. It helps put everything into persepctive and re evaluate our choices. Overall, I just really liked this book and I thoroughly enjoyed it. It was new. It was fresh. It was interesting. It was perfect. And for my fellow readers who are obsessed with romance, dont worry, there's still some romance in this novel. And it's the best type... love triangles ;). Pick this up, trust me when I say you won't be disappointed.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Lilyn G. | Sci-Fi & Scary

    When every human must be accounted for, and everything is kept track of, a second child is a danger. Not only to their family, but to the delicate system that has been put in place to protect humanity. Second children are a burden on a system that is already working towards population reduction to survive long enough. Well, supposedly. Possibly. Maybe. But the more Rowan – a second child – learns about the world outside her family home, the more confused she gets. Children of Eden could be a trop When every human must be accounted for, and everything is kept track of, a second child is a danger. Not only to their family, but to the delicate system that has been put in place to protect humanity. Second children are a burden on a system that is already working towards population reduction to survive long enough. Well, supposedly. Possibly. Maybe. But the more Rowan – a second child – learns about the world outside her family home, the more confused she gets. Children of Eden could be a trope ridden mess. The potential is there. It is a young adult dystopian novel with a strong female protagonist. The heroine who finds herself in a position to make a difference for the world. There’s even a tinge of a possible love triangle involved. Something bad has happened to the world, and it’s struggling to repair itself. In Eden, people live in districts – circles – and some are more privileged than others. As I said, it could be a trope ridden mess. It’s got the framework in place. Oh yes, and the made up swear words are ridiculous and detract from the seriousness of the story. But, it’s not. Instead, Children of Eden is a refreshing read. It re-opens weary eyes to the possibilities for adventure found within this sub-genre of YA novels. It gives us a heroine who has not come from a dirt-poor background, with some nigh unto magical skill or ability. Instead, Rowan seems very much a normal girl who had the bad luck to become a second child, with all the stress that entailed. She’s dangerously thoughtless at times, a bit selfish at others. Intelligent but unskilled in many things that would save her life. Not a special snowflake in any sense of the word. She’s a normal girl. The plot is straightforward enough. The action is simple. The authors aren’t given to losing themselves in paragraphs of needless description. The characters are ones you instinctively like (or hate when you’re supposed to hate). The pace is solid, the dialogue not intolerable. While it didn’t blow me away, it kept me well and truly interested, which is more than I can say for a lot of these novels nowadays. I would have liked to have seen a bit more originality in it, but given what they were working with, they did a great job. There were a few things I didn’t like, of course, like the reinforcement of prejudice towards an already targeted group of people, but I can’t go into them without possibly spoiling some of the book. So let’s just say I’m not blind to its flaws, but I can appreciate it for what it is. Joey Graceffa and Laura L. Sullivan give us a proper dystopian novel, even if they are evil and end it on a huge cliffhanger. From the wonderfully captivating cover to the characters and plot twists within, Children of Eden does a fantastic job of being a book that a reader will keep coming back to. Disclaimer: I received a copy of this book from the publisher for review consideration.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Amber

    so this is definitely not a standalone and despite it's abrupt ending, I'm looking forward to book two

  26. 5 out of 5

    Skaistė

    Knyga mane įtraukė, greitai pasinėriau į tolimą pasaulį ateityje, besistengiantį išgyventi po katastrofos, kai tenka laikytis griežtų taisyklių. Ir į žmogaus, kurio neturėjo būti, bet buvo, istoriją, bandant išgyventi ir išlikti tame pasaulyje. Veiksmas po truputį išsivysto, palaipsniui išaiškėja vis daugiau paslapčių, o kitų švysčioja tik krašteliai. Knygos pabaigoje istorija nutrūksta ir teks laukti tęsinio. Nebuvo kažo ypatingai naujo, bet man buvo gana įdomus skaitinys.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Jessica Strider

    Pros: engaging story, feisty protagonist Cons: fairly predictable, created swear words are more distracting than useful For Parents: non-graphic gun and knife violence, torture scenes, some kissing, fake swearing Eden is a closed world created when humanity was on the brink of destruction to save at least a few people until the ruined world was again fit for habitation. Rowan is a second child, illegal in Eden. Hidden by her family, she’s finally going to get a new identity and eye implants that wi Pros: engaging story, feisty protagonist Cons: fairly predictable, created swear words are more distracting than useful For Parents: non-graphic gun and knife violence, torture scenes, some kissing, fake swearing Eden is a closed world created when humanity was on the brink of destruction to save at least a few people until the ruined world was again fit for habitation. Rowan is a second child, illegal in Eden. Hidden by her family, she’s finally going to get a new identity and eye implants that will let her become a part of society. But she’ll also have to leave her family - and never return or see them again. In a fit of anger, she climbs the walls of her family home and escapes to the outside world, for a few hours of freedom. What happens during those hours creates rippling consequences that haunt the days that follow. If you’ve read a lot of dystopian YA none of this will be particularly new to you. The story runs in fairly predictable ways. The characters are generally what makes these books different and Rowan is a wonderful protagonist. She’s willful and determined, scared when out of her depth but able to push past her fear. She causes a few of her own problems, so it’s a good thing she’s resilient. Making her bi, or at least uncertain about her sexuality (without making a big deal out of it) was wonderfully refreshing. I liked both Lark and Lachlan as supporting characters, though Lark’s got my vote if the story develops more of a romance in later books. The story is quick and engaging. The world is well constructed. I thought it clever that there’s a fair amount of pre-Eden history but no Eden history. It gives the author options for the following books and I’m curious what he’ll do. I found the created swear words rather distracting and unnecessary. Instead of coming off as expletives, they confused me and bumped me out of the narrative. There’s a fair bit of violence including two torture scenes. Nothing is particularly graphic, and most of the violence has either a detached sense to it or is accompanied by the protagonist questioning the need for it and how the world should be better than this. There are a few kisses, but no other sexual content. While this isn’t highly original, it is a fun, quick read that will have you turning pages. It’s set-up for a series, and leaves you interested in the world and what’s going to happen next to the characters.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Jenna Carey

    Children of Eden was fast paced, had beautiful character development in not only major characters, but minor characters as well, and it was so beautifully written in a manner that I have never seen in teen fiction before. Overall, I hate most of the themes Graceffa tried to convey (very anti-government and anti-Christian) but I’m very pleased with the plot and the character development in the novel, which is ultimately what I look for in a good novel. Definitely would recommend, but would cautio Children of Eden was fast paced, had beautiful character development in not only major characters, but minor characters as well, and it was so beautifully written in a manner that I have never seen in teen fiction before. Overall, I hate most of the themes Graceffa tried to convey (very anti-government and anti-Christian) but I’m very pleased with the plot and the character development in the novel, which is ultimately what I look for in a good novel. Definitely would recommend, but would caution the reader regarding the untruthful themes. Corbyn, is that better😅

  29. 4 out of 5

    Abby

    This book had a lot of inherent problems. Most YA dystopians do, to be honest. But some of the things in this one were avoidable. Like how Rowan attaches to every person she meets like a leech. Add to that the most unrealistic love triangle I've ever seen. Problems aside, the story still kept my interest and was fairly enjoyable.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Jenna

    This review also appears on my blog, Reading with Jenna. I had been seeing Children of Eden around for a while and the synopsis sounded interesting enough that I eventually picked it up. There are two things that you should note about this book before picking it up. The first is that this book isn’t written solely by Joey Graceffa. Despite there being no indication on the cover, it clearly states on the title page that it was written with Laura L. Sullivan. The second thing is that, while this bo This review also appears on my blog, Reading with Jenna. I had been seeing Children of Eden around for a while and the synopsis sounded interesting enough that I eventually picked it up. There are two things that you should note about this book before picking it up. The first is that this book isn’t written solely by Joey Graceffa. Despite there being no indication on the cover, it clearly states on the title page that it was written with Laura L. Sullivan. The second thing is that, while this book is ostensibly a standalone, it really is not. The story does not end with any kind of resolution and actually leaves more questions than have been answered. There is definitely a sequel planned for this book. Children of Eden is a dystopian novel, set in a post-apocalyptic world where the sole survivors of Earth now live in Eden, where everything is regulated, including the human population. Each family is only allowed to have one child, in order to preserve the little amounts of food that exists in Eden. Second Children are illegal and are usually killed before they are even born. Those who have been hidden away in secret by their families, usually live a life of imprisonment and are not able to live a normal life, unless they are able to obtain black market lenses that are used for identification, and assume a new identity. Rowan is a Second Child and comes from a well-respected family who have the means to buy her a pair of lenses and a new identity. However, having this new identity and freedom means that she can never see her family again. When Rowan learns about this, she has her first act of rebellion and escapes from her house for a night. There she meets a friend but this taste of freedom leads to dangerous and tragic consequences. Soon, she finds herself on the run from the Greenshirts and meets other Second Children along the way. I liked the world in this book a lot. It was well conceptualised and nicely described. It wasn’t the most original of worlds and it’s definitely similar to other worlds that I’ve read about before. But I thought it included some interesting elements and I liked that there was a pretty big focus on it in the novel. Having said that, I do think that too much of the book was dedicated to the world building and there wasn’t a lot of anything else in the novel. I thought the book was well written for the most part. The writing was much better than I had expected going into the book. My criticism with the writing was that there was a bit too much telling and not enough showing. Rowan asks all the questions for the reader, which is not a style that I typically enjoy. Being told exactly what questions to ask about the story makes the reading experience less enjoyable for me and I was a bit bored with the book about 40% of the way in. There needed to be a lot more subtlety and a lot less telling. There was also some made up curses and swear words in the book, and I found them to be incredibly distracting and honestly, kind of stupid? It was something that I couldn’t really get over. The plot itself was fun and adventurous but I thought there needed to be better transitions and development. There isn’t a lot of action in the book, which is fine, but what was going on in the story gave me whiplash at times. For example, Rowan goes from hating someone to not wanting to be away from them within the span of a few pages. There just needed to be a bit more gradual development for my liking. There were also some things that I found to be unrealistic or hard to believe and I checked out of the story about halfway through. I did not understand the last 20 pages of the book at all and I disliked the way that it ended. I also found Rowan to be extremely annoying throughout the novel and I didn’t like her as a main character. I thought some of her decisions were very illogical and didn’t make sense to me. I just never managed to connect with her. My biggest issue with the book was the romance. There is love triangle in the book and they were both cases of instalove. My overall impression of the romance in the book was that it felt extremely forced and I was just disinterested in the romance. The only thing that I did like about it was that it was a bisexual love triangle but other than that, I was not on board with the romance. Needless to say, I probably won’t be picking up the sequel.

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