kode adsense disini
Hot Best Seller

The Practice of Poetry: Writing Exercises From Poets Who Teach

Availability: Ready to download

A distinctive collection of more than 90 effective poetry-writing exercises combined with corresponding essays to inspire writers of all levels.


Compare
kode adsense disini

A distinctive collection of more than 90 effective poetry-writing exercises combined with corresponding essays to inspire writers of all levels.

30 review for The Practice of Poetry: Writing Exercises From Poets Who Teach

  1. 4 out of 5

    Laura Ellen

    I was exposed to this work in an experimental poetry class taught by Carolyn Forche. Remains one of the only writing texts I can tolerate. I adapt these exercises for prose, and they work wonderfully.

  2. 5 out of 5

    James

    Part of me wants to hate on writing-by-formula, but I like this book a lot and was interested in a lot of the exercises. It's a good read on its own, even if you don't intend to use any of the prompts. After each prompt, the author explains why s/he finds these particular constraints valuable. I liked Agha Shahid Ali's reflections on the ghazal especially. Also, most of the authors qualify their prompts as ways of making discoveries, not keys to creating perfect poems on the spot. Plus, the last Part of me wants to hate on writing-by-formula, but I like this book a lot and was interested in a lot of the exercises. It's a good read on its own, even if you don't intend to use any of the prompts. After each prompt, the author explains why s/he finds these particular constraints valuable. I liked Agha Shahid Ali's reflections on the ghazal especially. Also, most of the authors qualify their prompts as ways of making discoveries, not keys to creating perfect poems on the spot. Plus, the last section on revision sort of grounds all the creative hullabaloo of the previous chapters. Lynn Emanuel's essay is especially sobering and good.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Terry

    You know how my darling friends encouraged me to use My Summer of Desperate Unemployment as a sort of writer's retreat and take advantage of my MANY HOURS OF FREE TIME by, you know, writing? Yah, I didn't do any. But! I did pull this book out of storage and I did just recently complete one exercise. Which turned out TERRIBLY, BUT, doing so did get my writing mojo to wake up and creak to life and I came up with an idea for a poem and that is awesome. This book is TERRIFIC for teachers, for writer You know how my darling friends encouraged me to use My Summer of Desperate Unemployment as a sort of writer's retreat and take advantage of my MANY HOURS OF FREE TIME by, you know, writing? Yah, I didn't do any. But! I did pull this book out of storage and I did just recently complete one exercise. Which turned out TERRIBLY, BUT, doing so did get my writing mojo to wake up and creak to life and I came up with an idea for a poem and that is awesome. This book is TERRIFIC for teachers, for writers, for anyone who is curious about poetry-writing (hint: it's a craft, people, not some random jottings of your mind).

  4. 4 out of 5

    Douglas

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. The Practice of Poetry is a book that you (sometimes as an individual, sometimes in a group) do, more than a book you read. It doesn't have a lot of data on the technical aspects of poetry (rhyme, meter, style, etc.) It also doesn't address the various schools and movements of poetry. It has a lot of exercises on various aspects of poetry (mining the unconscious, writing in images and metaphors, what voice is being used, the use/misuse of strangeness, poetic structure, the poetry/music connectio The Practice of Poetry is a book that you (sometimes as an individual, sometimes in a group) do, more than a book you read. It doesn't have a lot of data on the technical aspects of poetry (rhyme, meter, style, etc.) It also doesn't address the various schools and movements of poetry. It has a lot of exercises on various aspects of poetry (mining the unconscious, writing in images and metaphors, what voice is being used, the use/misuse of strangeness, poetic structure, the poetry/music connection, and rewriting). I would have liked to see some of the poetry of the contributors to see if I wanted to investigate them further. There is plenty of empty space where that could be done. As this book was published in 1992, the comment by contributor Agha Shahid Ali that ghazals are an unfamiliar form in American poetry is no longer true, as Robert Bly used them in his books "The Night Abraham Called To The Stars" and "My Sentence Was a Thousand Years of Joy." Many of the poems referenced are now available on the internet, so the references as to where to obtain the poems mentioned in the book, and the poems of the contributors, are dated. It would be great if there was a new edition of this book. But the exercises are time-independent, and if you do them, your poetry will most likely improve.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Nicola

    As a soon-to-be Intro to Poetry Writing instructor, this is a great touchstone. Can't wait to experiment on my fledgling-guinea-pig-poet-undergrad-beasties. If I don't directly use these exercises, I'm sure to indirectly use them. Best part of the book for me were the explanations of the exercises.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Faith-Anne

    This is a good reference book for poets.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Jimmy

    An excellent collection of essays on writing poetry. I wish I had it when I taught my poetry writing class.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Sam

    They have some pretty good writing prompts for poetry :)

  9. 5 out of 5

    Kat

    A great resource for writing exercises, prompts, ideas, and encouragement.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Pattee

    Much of my reading this period has been that of actual poetry. From this beginning introduction to the reach and range of voice in poems I have entered a boundary-less and fantastical world. A world of structure, no structure, metaphor, rhythm, sometimes rhyme, line lengths, space, beginnings, and endings. Reading the work of other poets has been an education for me in the unlimited possibilities in the use of language. I have also consumed books on the meaning of poetry, the place of poetry in t Much of my reading this period has been that of actual poetry. From this beginning introduction to the reach and range of voice in poems I have entered a boundary-less and fantastical world. A world of structure, no structure, metaphor, rhythm, sometimes rhyme, line lengths, space, beginnings, and endings. Reading the work of other poets has been an education for me in the unlimited possibilities in the use of language. I have also consumed books on the meaning of poetry, the place of poetry in time and culture, the evolution of styles, poetry as a digital entity, and various views on what is and is not a poem. These often set foot into the realm of theory, of strict definition, of world views as technical or humanist. I found C.P. Snow’s premise of there being two basic cultures, one technical/rational, the other humanist/emotional, fascinating. His placement of poetry in the technical/rational camp was a surprise to me (more on this later in the semester). I have read about what poetry ‘should’ consist of and about the eternal vitality and power of words. What made The Making of a Poem stand out for me was its insistent assertion that poetry itself, requires formal practice. The authors hold firm their assertion that while talent is a basic requirement for a poet, “curiosity, determination, and the willingness to learn from others” (p. xi) must also be cultivated. They present a book which offers exercise after exercise for the poet to develop both a practice and a voice for their work. Behn and Twitchell divided their book into seven sections. Each section delineated a specific theme and within the sections are exercises and reflections on meaning. The authors state that “Poetry, like any art, required practice.” They go on to say that: Good exercises are provocative, challenging, and often entertaining. A good exercise will engage you on at least several levels, and should necessitate the breaking of new ground. (p. xiii) I initially approached their premise with moderate skepticism, reading into the title a “Poetry for Dummies” approach to the art. I was dubious of the value of a trial and error, cookbook approach to writing a poem. My exalted view of poetry excluded any interest in considering banal exercises as a necessary component of being a poet. Yet this book consists of exercise after exercise created by a range of respected poets who have used variants of these in their teaching of poetry. As Behn and Twichell clearly state in their introduction: The aspiring poet must apprentice him or herself, must master the elements of language, the complexities of form and its relation to subject, the feel of the line, the image, the play of sound, that makes it possible to respond in a voice with subtlety and range where he hears music in his inner ear, or she sees in the world that image that’s the spark of a poem (p. xi). The sections of the book are grouped based on the area of inquiry, as opposed to level of poetic expertise. This approach enables poets at any level of experience to pick and choose their own level of interest and/or difficulty. I found Part 1 “Ladders to the Dark” to be very useful in its approaches and prompts to just getting ink to page. Other sections consisted of attention to objects, aspects of voice, making use of the intuitive and the non-rational mind, structural possibilities, experimentation with rhyme, lineation, and rhythm, and finally, Part 7 “Major and Minor Surgery.” Entering into the spirit of the book, I began to leaf through its many exercises and try them out for myself. The remainder of this paper will focus on some examples I worked on and my assessment of the ‘practice’ of poetry writing. Part 1 “Ladders to the Dark,” focuses on the importance of mining the unconscious for material. Rita Dove offers “the ten-minute spill” where the writer creates a 10-line poem which must include a proverb or adage, and use 5 of the 8 words she supplies for the student (cliff, needle, voice, whir, blackberry, cloud, mother, lick). To know one It takes one Mother Hanging on a cliff The needle whir of cloud voices Urgent Compelling me To be one To hide one To find one In Part 2, “The Things of the World,” attention is focused on the object itself. How to approach the object, personify (or not) it, how to make it concrete or illusive, strange or familiar. One exercise here was to write a poem that is merely a list of things: One quail in a bevy of quails One swan in a lamentation of swans One kangaroo in a troop of kangaroos One strumpet in a fanfare of strumpets One patient in a virtue of patients A bloat of hippotami A fluther of jellyfish An exhaltation of larks Out of these, the world is born. Another exercise was to remember a person you know well and describe the person’s hands. Here the object was to explore unique ways to view a common thing or experience which gives a sense of character to that thing. Utile and strong Digits not yet frozen by arthritis Skin not yet spotted by age Veins, pronounced Knuckles, tidy Hands like breathing tokens of kindness and milk While these exercises may seem elementary, they are not easy. Whether the poem is to tell a story, contain a feeling, or describe a mundane object, I realized that thought, syntax, adjectives, and nouns required care and then more care. To have the poem breathe, the words need to resonate and sentences/lines must convey and aspect or feeling of a life. These exercises prompt the exploration of language and sound, thinking about metaphor and repetition. The exercises further create food for thought and for writing especially on days when creativity is skulking on one of Dante’s grim paths. Other exercises in this book included trying out different ‘types’ of poems. Part 6, “Laws of the Wild,” emphasized structure, shape, and organization of the poem. I tried writing a villanelle which was a complicated and frustrating task. I found it very difficult to fit words to line numbers, rhyme pattern, and repetition. I wonder why Dylan Thomas chose this form.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Tandava Brahmachari

    A great concept, with many different people submitting writing exercises on everything from facing the blank page to revising an existing poem. I didn't find myself getting particularly excited about very many of them, and I often felt things were more subconscious than I'd like, though I suppose that's okay at some level of just needing to learn and practice. But I took away a few ideas I might try.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Maria

    There are some great exercises in here. Very inspiring! Even with the ones I didn't think much of, my classmates would come up with something intriguing or brilliant that changed how I thought about the exercise. I'm definitely keeping this book to refer back to.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Jona & Joslyn

    I would like to see more examples of finished poems. Explaining how to write it is often not enough. A finished model, after explanation would be helpful.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Sundry

    Good selection of exercises. More aimed at teachers than at writers, but it sparked some productive writing sessions.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Mark

    Behn, Robin, and Chase Twichell. The Practice of Poetry : Writing Exercises from Poets Who Teach. 1st ed. New York N.Y.: Collins Reference, 2005. Print. This book serves multiple purposes, although I approached it as a solo poet, working alone. It could easily be used in a classroom situation or other group setting. The book primarily consists of exercises, of various types, supplied by teachers of poetry writing. There are exercises for the individual and for groups. Many of the group exercises Behn, Robin, and Chase Twichell. The Practice of Poetry : Writing Exercises from Poets Who Teach. 1st ed. New York N.Y.: Collins Reference, 2005. Print. This book serves multiple purposes, although I approached it as a solo poet, working alone. It could easily be used in a classroom situation or other group setting. The book primarily consists of exercises, of various types, supplied by teachers of poetry writing. There are exercises for the individual and for groups. Many of the group exercises can be easily modified for use by the lone poet, and all can certainly be used in a group, although they might need some modification to make them more useful as group exercises. The book consists of an Introduction, 7 parts, and 2 appendices. 1. Ladders to the Dark: The Unconscious as Gold Mine 2. The Things of this World: Image and Metaphor 3. Who's Talking and Why?: The Self and Its Subjects A. Aspects of Voice B. What's It About? 4. Truth in Strangeness: Accidents, Chance, and the Nonrational 5. Laws of the Wild: Structure, Shapeliness, and Organizing Principles 6. Musical Matters: Sound, Rhythm, and the Line 7. Major and Minor Surgery: On Revision and Writer's Block A. Exercises B. Reflections App. A. Mail-order sources of poetry books [Which I fear may be horribly out-of-date] App. B. Published works referred to in the text There is also a Contributor's Notes section and an Index. Depending on who you are, and how you react to what is basically a self-help book, you will get varying amounts of use from this book. Poetry writing instructors could well find lots of useful stimulation and full-fledged exercises in this book. Being who I am, along with my general lack of effort put into self-help books, I did not find a lot, although I certainly did find some value in it. If I can simply make myself do some of these exercise then I will gain a fair bit from it. If I counted correctly, there are 88 exercises in the book. Ones for groups are so identified in the table of contents. There appears to be 8 so designated but, again, many of the others could be easily modified for group use. As I read through the book I put a pencil mark next to the titles in the table of contents of those I thought might be immediately useful to me. That is, of those I might actually bother to do. I marked 9 such exercises; 3 from Pt. 2 (metaphor and image), 1 from Pt. 3 (aspects of voice), 3 from Pt. 4 ("Truth in Strangeness"), 1 from Pt. 5 (structure), and 1 from Pt. 7 (revision). All in all, I think that is a fair amount. And no doubt, if I can bring myself to do some of these then I imagine that I might be inspired to do others. Nine out of 88 is over 10% that I found immediately useful and doable. I call that a pretty good bargain seeing as I got the book from amazon for $10.99. If you are a highly self-motivated poet who finds or invents prompts and writing exercises on your own then you might not need this book, although that is not to say that you would get nothing from it. But if you are looking for ideas, or if you invest more authority in "official" teachers than in other sources of ideas, you might well get some help and guidance from this book. Keep in mind that this book can be read and used in any order. It is meant to be dipped into as need and interest drive one, and not necessarily read cover to cover as I did. Yes, my star rating seems higher than my write-up but I am accounting for the quality of the book and not my general laziness and lack of doing in regards to self-help books.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Cylia Kamp

    Well, never say never! I'm moving this book to my to-read, read-again-later shelves. It's still on my real desktop, but I feel an increasing lack of closure seeing it on my currently-reading shelf every time I open my virtual desktop. I do read it off and on but not all the time! There's no shelf that exactly fits this book's category. Yet it's still a 5-Star winner, but more a reference than a read-start-to-finish book. ------------------------------------------------------ This is a fantastic bo Well, never say never! I'm moving this book to my to-read, read-again-later shelves. It's still on my real desktop, but I feel an increasing lack of closure seeing it on my currently-reading shelf every time I open my virtual desktop. I do read it off and on but not all the time! There's no shelf that exactly fits this book's category. Yet it's still a 5-Star winner, but more a reference than a read-start-to-finish book. ------------------------------------------------------ This is a fantastic book of writing prompts. A virtual friend of mine (a real poet) from a writing course I took last year recommended it on her blog: http://mollyspencer.wordpress.com/. Not only are Molly's book recommendations wonderful so are her blog and poetry. But I digress. What I started to write was I'll probably never move this book to my "read" shelf. With a resource like this, the point is not to finish, but to incorporate the authors' suggestions into my own writing and to work randomly through the different exercises. I may even repeat some of them. So I guess The Practice of Poetry: Writing Exercises From Poets Who Teach will remain on my "currently-reading" shelf for a long time.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Anna Hiller

    This book is just chock full of useful exercises to get a poet's pen moving. Some of them are more useful than others, some of them are downright annoying (but not as annoying as the hot-potato exercise that Eric Maisel recommends in "Fearless Creating"--*there's* a book I don't recommend). I'd say that if you're a severely blocked poet, this book might be of use to you, but only if you're prepared to experiment with exercises that may feel very uncomfortable at first, sometimes even trite. Overc This book is just chock full of useful exercises to get a poet's pen moving. Some of them are more useful than others, some of them are downright annoying (but not as annoying as the hot-potato exercise that Eric Maisel recommends in "Fearless Creating"--*there's* a book I don't recommend). I'd say that if you're a severely blocked poet, this book might be of use to you, but only if you're prepared to experiment with exercises that may feel very uncomfortable at first, sometimes even trite. Overcoming writer's block is different than honing your craft. If there's one positive thing to say about this book, it is that it works well for either issue, and is probably worth owning if you're serious about the writing process, or about *teaching*, as it provides useful exercises for the classroom.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Lesley

    I just revisited this book in 2017 (first time: 2012). I'm in desperate need of some places to start writing again and exercises work well for me if they are crafted based on rich background and give enough room for a wide variety of responses. It's a bonus if there are references to poets and poems too. This book is the only one I've found that meets this criteria. Probably if I looked around for materials aimed at teachers I would find more. This book makes me think of the most successful (for I just revisited this book in 2017 (first time: 2012). I'm in desperate need of some places to start writing again and exercises work well for me if they are crafted based on rich background and give enough room for a wide variety of responses. It's a bonus if there are references to poets and poems too. This book is the only one I've found that meets this criteria. Probably if I looked around for materials aimed at teachers I would find more. This book makes me think of the most successful (for me) writing workshops I have participated in -- ones where some kind of discussion about a poem or aspects of poetry leads into a couple of examples which leads into a jumping off place for poets to explore in their own way. I miss that kind of unstructured structured writing time.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Jobie

    I read this entire book and did about 85% of the exercises. I plan on doing most of the ones I haven't in the next month or so. I worked through this book over the 2014 year and it was a great help to me. I am a struggling poet - ie I don't consider myself even a good poet. This book gave me a few tools in my poetry toolkit that I believe I will go back to time and time again. What I discovered through reading this book is that I don't know what makes a good poem. I know what I like and what speak I read this entire book and did about 85% of the exercises. I plan on doing most of the ones I haven't in the next month or so. I worked through this book over the 2014 year and it was a great help to me. I am a struggling poet - ie I don't consider myself even a good poet. This book gave me a few tools in my poetry toolkit that I believe I will go back to time and time again. What I discovered through reading this book is that I don't know what makes a good poem. I know what I like and what speaks to me but as far as I can tell my poetry does none of that. I'm not sure what would take some of my mediocre poems from that to good or even great. This book did NOT help with that. However, the writing exercises proved to give valuable ways of how to think about writing poetry.

  20. 4 out of 5

    SmarterLilac

    Yowza. In 1998, a creative writing grad student (I was a lowely sophomore at the time) gave us a photocopied page out of this book. I loved it. Except it never produced even one complete poem for me. Frustrated, I eventually quite trying to do the exercise. But I did keep the photocopy. Damn. I should have bought this book years ago. I have never bought a book on the creation of any art in which the contributors pushed their 'students' to get deep into the wildness and passion of free verse, the Yowza. In 1998, a creative writing grad student (I was a lowely sophomore at the time) gave us a photocopied page out of this book. I loved it. Except it never produced even one complete poem for me. Frustrated, I eventually quite trying to do the exercise. But I did keep the photocopy. Damn. I should have bought this book years ago. I have never bought a book on the creation of any art in which the contributors pushed their 'students' to get deep into the wildness and passion of free verse, the complexity of formal verse and its purpose, or expected the reader to be ****ing paying attention. This is both for hard core professionals who've hit a rut, as well as amateurs. Think you know everything the poetry world has to offer? Read this book. It will blow your mind.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Heidi Contreras

    This is a practical writing book that jump starts the creative process. It is one I go back to time and time again. I have not finished reading it cover to cover, because I don't have to. This book is meant to be grabbed off the shelf, used and used over and over again. I love it. I met Chase Twichell who co-edited this book with Robin Behn at TU's Writer's Conference several years ago. She is a delightful person.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Cynthia

    I've had this book for over 7 years. I've used it more than any other writing book I've ever had. This is a great book to have around if and when you have block but still want to get some words down. It is also helpful around technique as it is organized into technical sections such as "Image and Metaphor," Aspects of Voice," or "Sound, Rhythm, and the Line."

  23. 5 out of 5

    Susan Swartwout

    I had the great good fortune to have Robin Behn as my first college poetry professor. The exercises in this boom--from creative-writing workshop facilitators across the nation--are great for individual practice or for the classroom.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Carol

    This book has found a permanent place in my life. The exercises in it have inspired about half of the poems I have written since I bought it. Every time I pick it up, it is like attending a poetry seminar held just for me.

  25. 4 out of 5

    John Struloeff

    As a poetry writing teacher, I've used this book to prompt ideas for in-class writing. I haven't used any of the ideas from the book directly yet, which seems odd to me, but it has prompted new ideas of my own.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Sophie

    Whether I do an exercise from this book by myself or with a writing group, I always end up with something interesting and unexpected. A unique collection offering wide interpretations and great ideas.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Terry

    As a collection of exercises, this can't be beat. As it comes from College creative writing classes, it often needs some adaptation for younger, less committed students. Still, there is a wealth of info here, enough to last a school year or five.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Karin Wiberg

    I've gotten some good poems out of these exercises. Great to pick up when you're not sure what to write.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Rochelle Jewel Shapiro

    Great excercises from poets who teach. It would be a fine book to use with a workshop.

  30. 5 out of 5

    MshMsh

    Great ideas for poetry workshops.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.