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In this memoir, David Lynch - co-creator of Twin Peaks and writer and director of groundbreaking films like Eraserhead, The Elephant Man, Blue Velvet and Mulholland Drive - opens up about a lifetime of extraordinary creativity, the friendships he has made along the way and the struggles he has faced - sometimes successful, sometimes not - to bring his projects to fruition. In this memoir, David Lynch - co-creator of Twin Peaks and writer and director of groundbreaking films like Eraserhead, The Elephant Man, Blue Velvet and Mulholland Drive - opens up about a lifetime of extraordinary creativity, the friendships he has made along the way and the struggles he has faced - sometimes successful, sometimes not - to bring his projects to fruition. Part-memoir, part-biography, Room to Dream interweaves Lynch's own reflections on his life with the story of those times, as told by Kristine McKenna, drawing from extensive and explosive interviews with ninety of Lynch's friends, family members, actors, agents, musicians and collaborators. Lynch responds to each recollection and reveals the inner story of the life behind the art.


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In this memoir, David Lynch - co-creator of Twin Peaks and writer and director of groundbreaking films like Eraserhead, The Elephant Man, Blue Velvet and Mulholland Drive - opens up about a lifetime of extraordinary creativity, the friendships he has made along the way and the struggles he has faced - sometimes successful, sometimes not - to bring his projects to fruition. In this memoir, David Lynch - co-creator of Twin Peaks and writer and director of groundbreaking films like Eraserhead, The Elephant Man, Blue Velvet and Mulholland Drive - opens up about a lifetime of extraordinary creativity, the friendships he has made along the way and the struggles he has faced - sometimes successful, sometimes not - to bring his projects to fruition. Part-memoir, part-biography, Room to Dream interweaves Lynch's own reflections on his life with the story of those times, as told by Kristine McKenna, drawing from extensive and explosive interviews with ninety of Lynch's friends, family members, actors, agents, musicians and collaborators. Lynch responds to each recollection and reveals the inner story of the life behind the art.

30 review for Room to Dream

  1. 5 out of 5

    Valerity (Val)

    Room To Dream This is a very enjoyable biography told with a dual perspective that I found very readable and descriptive. I’m not quite sure how it got lost in my TBR pile, as I should have read it much sooner and wish I had now, as much as I’ve liked it. Filled with quirky stories about David Lynch as he grows up discovers what he’s about, moving from different places and the effects they had on him. When and how he got interested in art, and his near-obsession with art and painting that was su Room To Dream This is a very enjoyable biography told with a dual perspective that I found very readable and descriptive. I’m not quite sure how it got lost in my TBR pile, as I should have read it much sooner and wish I had now, as much as I’ve liked it. Filled with quirky stories about David Lynch as he grows up discovers what he’s about, moving from different places and the effects they had on him. When and how he got interested in art, and his near-obsession with art and painting that was such a part of his life for quite a while. Then the all-important point when David’s focus shifted from painting to making films. It also shares about his personal life too, his family and friends and many girlfriends until he marries and starts a family of his own. My thanks for the advance electronic copy that was provided by NetGalley, authors David Lynch & Kristine McKenna, and the publisher for my fair review. The Author: David Lynch advanced to the front ranks of international cinema in 1977 with the release of his first film, the startlingly original Eraserhead. Since then, Lynch has been nominated for two Best Director Academy Awards for The Elephant Man and Blue Velvet, was awarded the Palme d’Or for Wild at Heart, swept the country with Twin Peaks mania in 1990 when his groundbreaking television series premiered on ABC, and has established himself as an artist of tremendous range and wit. He is the author of a previous book, Catching the Big Fish, on Transcendental Meditation. Kristine McKenna is a widely published critic and journalist who wrote for the Los Angeles Times from 1976 through 1998 and has been a close friend and interviewer of David Lynch since 1979. Her profiles and criticism have appeared in Artforum, The New York Times, ARTnews, Vanity Fair, The Washington Post, and Rolling Stone. Her books include The Ferus Gallery: A Place to Begin and two collections of interviews. Random House 534 pages Pub: June 19th, 2018 My BookZone blog: https://wordpress.com/post/bookblog20...

  2. 5 out of 5

    Elyse Walters

    “When I picture Boise in my mind, I see euphoric 1950s chrome optimism”, David Lynch said. When he was 14, his family moved to Alexandria, Virginia. Though Lynch flourished as a high school student in Alexandria...leaving Boise is when the music stopped... but the 1950’s never really ever went away for David.... girls in bobby sox and saddle shoes, classic rock ‘n’ roll, smoking cigarettes, BBQ’s - most: the *mood* of the time.... the innocence & goodness....and the dark forces pulsing beneath “When I picture Boise in my mind, I see euphoric 1950s chrome optimism”, David Lynch said. When he was 14, his family moved to Alexandria, Virginia. Though Lynch flourished as a high school student in Alexandria...leaving Boise is when the music stopped... but the 1950’s never really ever went away for David.... girls in bobby sox and saddle shoes, classic rock ‘n’ roll, smoking cigarettes, BBQ’s - most: the *mood* of the time.... the innocence & goodness....and the dark forces pulsing beneath it. The neighborhood where ‘Blue Velvet’ was shot looks much like his old neighborhood in Boise. God - I’ll never forget watching that film. I can’t express how much I enjoyed this book - reflecting memories into my own-David Lynch-entertainment-history... ( my daughter, Ali, and I watched Mulholland Drive together at ‘least’ 5 times).... While Twin Peaks got David to the very center of television and popular culture, he didn’t want to be in the center. I understand that!!!! “He was most ‘happy’ within the world he created for himself”. Damn, I adore this man! Gobbling up details about David’s personal/work/and spiritual life...from many people who were interviewed to David sharing himself, was simply heartwarming delicious. A biography/memoir combination ... which I thought worked perfectly. NOTE: if you google David Lynch ‘paintings’... you’ll be amazed of how much he has done - subconscious surreal bizarre paintings!!!! Fascinating!!!

  3. 4 out of 5

    Ana

    “Nobody is neutral on the subject of Lynch.” Truer words have never been written! Do you ever watch INLAND EMPIRE two or three times in a row and feel like you don’t understand the world anymore? Yeah, me neither… Then, reading this book, you’ll come across Noriko Miyakawa’s words - “The parts of the film you don’t understand point to places in yourself that need examining” - and feel you need to do some more soul searching, because nowhere in here is this bad boy explained. Simply that “it’s “Nobody is neutral on the subject of Lynch.” Truer words have never been written! Do you ever watch INLAND EMPIRE two or three times in a row and feel like you don’t understand the world anymore? Yeah, me neither… Then, reading this book, you’ll come across Noriko Miyakawa’s words - “The parts of the film you don’t understand point to places in yourself that need examining” - and feel you need to do some more soul searching, because nowhere in here is this bad boy explained. Simply that “it’s deep in interesting ways, and it goes into different places and has different textures that hook together. You enter the film in one place and you come out in another,” which is what I always loved about David Lynch when asked to talk about his films: abstract AF… I loved the behind the scenes of Twin Peaks: The Return and it saddens me there won’t be any more episodes! Oh, well… “If I look at any page of this book, I think, Man, that’s just the tip of the iceberg; there’s so much more, so many more stories. You could do an entire book on a single day and still not capture everything. It’s impossible to really tell the story of somebody’s life, and the most we can hope to convey here is a very abstract “Rosebud.” Ultimately, each life is a mystery until we each solve the mystery, and that’s where we are all headed whether we know it or not.”

  4. 4 out of 5

    Kasa Cotugno

    In depth analysis of David Lynch and his creative processes. Each section is composed of two parts, one a biography, the other, a memoir illuminating the former. I've always been curious as to why someone who hit it out of the park with Eraserhead and Elephant Man was such a poor choice for Dune, but with subsequent work illustrating his influences more strategically, he redeemed himself. His small town upbringing is twisted on its ear (literally) with Blue Velvet, and his memory of going huntin In depth analysis of David Lynch and his creative processes. Each section is composed of two parts, one a biography, the other, a memoir illuminating the former. I've always been curious as to why someone who hit it out of the park with Eraserhead and Elephant Man was such a poor choice for Dune, but with subsequent work illustrating his influences more strategically, he redeemed himself. His small town upbringing is twisted on its ear (literally) with Blue Velvet, and his memory of going hunting with his father through nighttime Idaho, where all was black illuminated by headlights, shows up repeatedly most notably in the opening sequences of Lost Highway and Mulhulland Drive. He continues to find new ways of expressing himself, even in a cartoon titled "Angriest Dog in the World," and in producing his own coffee to go with superior pie. A true original.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Reuben

    Straight off the bat I have to say: don't believe the way this book describes itself. Statements like "David Lynch opens up for the first time about a life lived in pursuit of his singular vision", "An unprecedented look into the personal and creative life of the visionary auteur David Lynch" and "Lynch’s lyrical, intimate, and unfiltered personal reflections riff off biographical sections" make it sound like this book will explore his creative process in some way, but it doesn't. When it talks Straight off the bat I have to say: don't believe the way this book describes itself. Statements like "David Lynch opens up for the first time about a life lived in pursuit of his singular vision", "An unprecedented look into the personal and creative life of the visionary auteur David Lynch" and "Lynch’s lyrical, intimate, and unfiltered personal reflections riff off biographical sections" make it sound like this book will explore his creative process in some way, but it doesn't. When it talks of intimate and unfiltered reflections, it's talking about scenes like David comparing his first wank to man "discovering fire". I don't think this is intentionally misleading marketing, but I also don't feel as though I was the one with misjudged expectations going in either. I never expected David Lynch to sit down and say, "Right, Axxon N. in INLAND EMPIRE means this. . ." That's not how art works, and it's certainly not how Lynch's art works. Besides, I wouldn't want that. What I did expect from the above statements, whoever, is a look into his creative process that stems beyond his well-known and vague use of meditation. That never really materialises in Room to Dream. Almost every chapter of this book is devoted to one of his projects, but the deepest any of them go in discussing that project is usually capped at how hard it was for David Lynch to get funding (which can often make reading this a slog). Only rarely do they discuss filming in more than a superficial way. Most of the time Kristine McKenna interviews members of the set and they all give fairly similar one-note responses: "David Lynch is amazing, and working with him is unlike working with anyone else." etc etc. Repetitious is how this book ends up feelings for large swathes. Almost ritualistic. The elephant in the room for me with regards to Lynch is how he treats women. How he burns through marriages, how he frequently sexualises female corpses, or has beautiful naked women on screen for a few seconds only to have them brutally murdered etc. And this is definitely a theme present in Room to Dream. Almost every film of Lynch's has been accused of being misogynistic by someone, and this book responds each time. It also responds every time Lynch cheats on a girlfriend, wife, pregnant partner, or mother to one of his newly-born. The only problem is, Kristine McKenna always has the same airbrushed response to give. She simply quotes another review that says "Nah guys, this is art, not misogyny", or, and she does this too many times to count, quotes Jennifer Lynch as saying "My dad is a good man, his problem is that he has too much love to give and so can't help himself with new women." And it's like. . . why tackle this issue, if you're only going to repeatedly, and fairly cheaply try to protect David from criticism at all costs? I don't think he's a misogynist; but I do think that his relationship with women is troubling and his love of the "woman-in-trouble" often correlates with a morbid interest in violence perpetrated against women. Also the amount of times he cheats on partners, especially when they have young or middling children, is inexplicably shitty. That's not an excess of love, that's a dearth of humanity. The book lost a lot of credibility for me when it handled this aspect of Lynch in such a lazy and biased way. I started to wonder what this book is, and whether it's no more than a glorified puff piece (which is part of the trouble when the artist themself writes 50% of the book). Because the way it handles Lynch as a person is more akin to some sort of cult leader. With the biographical side of this book being 70% interview quotes there's an awful lot of parts where it's just the same sentiment in a different mouth: "Lynch is amazing, and working with him has changed my life for the better. He is charismatic and when he walks into the room you feel at ease." I don't actually think this is all a bad thing, though. While, like a lot of the book, it's repetitious, it does show you, time and time again, that at his heart Lynch can be a very caring and disarming person. The stories of him reaching out to so many people are heart-warming and deepened my opinion of Lynch as a person. He's far from perfect, as evidenced above, but he is at least self-aware of his luck and wants to share it with others. It's a very selective portrait of Lynch, only showing his good sides, but I do think this is a true aspect of him (even if it's only part of the picture). And overall, the book isn't bad. The opening few chapters about Lynch's childhood and ascent from straight-A student to artistic rebel are illuminating, as is the chapter on Eraserhead (one of the few chapters to discuss the film-making beyond merely discussions about funding and casting). The chapters between that and Twin Peaks: The Return (80% of the book) are pretty mediocre and formuliac unfortunately; but the last chapter is really great. Sadly, a lot of the most interesting stories and anecdotes in this book are things you will have heard if you are a fan of David Lynch--and since you have to be a fan to want to read a 600 page biography-cum-memoir about him. . . I'm not sure who the audience for that is really. I've given this three stars. It deserves two really; but I'm a criminal Lynch apologist and that's not going to stop here. Would I recommend the book though? Absolutely not.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Spencer

    I adore David Lynch; he is without doubt my favourite film maker and probably my biggest idol so it’s not surprising that I loved this book. David comes across as charming, unusual and creative and this is conveyed in the book really well and you get some wonderful insight in to his unique mind. I liked the style of the book as well, Kristine McKenna produced a biography based on interviews with over 100 people and after each section David adds to this and expands the facts further with a persona I adore David Lynch; he is without doubt my favourite film maker and probably my biggest idol so it’s not surprising that I loved this book. David comes across as charming, unusual and creative and this is conveyed in the book really well and you get some wonderful insight in to his unique mind. I liked the style of the book as well, Kristine McKenna produced a biography based on interviews with over 100 people and after each section David adds to this and expands the facts further with a personal touch. Despite all the compliments I probably wouldn’t recommend this to someone unfamiliar with Lynch as this book feels like it was produced for fans not for those new to him and his work. If you are a fan I'd say that this is a must read and I'd give it my highest recommendation.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Eddie Watkins

    Repetitive and somewhat boring, though there are great anecdotes sprinkled throughout. I think the problem is Lynch has never really changed since he was a kid, which is a good thing because Lynch as he is is great, but it makes for a rather boring and repetitive memoir/biography - everybody from childhood friends to Hollywoodians saying the same things about him - and since Lynch is not very self-reflective or self-analytical, his portions also tread the same ground, with variations, over and o Repetitive and somewhat boring, though there are great anecdotes sprinkled throughout. I think the problem is Lynch has never really changed since he was a kid, which is a good thing because Lynch as he is is great, but it makes for a rather boring and repetitive memoir/biography - everybody from childhood friends to Hollywoodians saying the same things about him - and since Lynch is not very self-reflective or self-analytical, his portions also tread the same ground, with variations, over and over.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Text Publishing

    ‘A fascinating look into an endlessly imaginative and alarming man.’ Otago Daily Times ‘[A] memorable portrait of one of cinema’s great auteurs…It provides a remarkable insight into Lynch’s intense commitment to the “art life”.’ Guardian ‘Traditional and comprehensive on one side while whimsical and irreverent on the other, Room to Dream manages to have it both ways...[A]n enthusiastic, contagious tribute to creativity itself.’ Brag ‘Room to Dream is described as “part-memoir, part-biography” and t ‘A fascinating look into an endlessly imaginative and alarming man.’ Otago Daily Times ‘[A] memorable portrait of one of cinema’s great auteurs…It provides a remarkable insight into Lynch’s intense commitment to the “art life”.’ Guardian ‘Traditional and comprehensive on one side while whimsical and irreverent on the other, Room to Dream manages to have it both ways...[A]n enthusiastic, contagious tribute to creativity itself.’ Brag ‘Room to Dream is described as “part-­memoir, part-biography” and this duality proves to be extraordinarily productive…This enlightening and exhaustive book should be an essential way of discovering more about [Lynch] and his world.’ Australian ‘...the blending of biography and memoir into a kind of biographical duet turns the whole project on its head, makes it different, stranger, more alive…Exactly what Lynch always does in his art.’ LA Times ‘[A] cubist portrait of the artist, body and mind on separate tracks…Room to Dream offers countless new stories, even for Lynch fanatics.’ Washington Post ‘What makes this book endearing is its chatty, calm...anti-Hollywood attitude…and matter-of-fact defiance of reality.’ San Francisco Chronicle ‘The book doesn’t give us one focused view of Lynch, but a double vision, as though two similar but not quite exact portraits of the man have been projected onto one another…There is value, joy, and beauty in staying with Lynch and his cohorts for these 500-plus pages.’ Los Angeles Times ‘Intimate and honest…McKenna’s interviewees unfailingly describe Lynch's charisma and warmth, and his methodical but instinctive dedication to craft.’ NPR ‘A strikingly multidimensional portrait of the artist…[An] incandescently detailed and complexly enlightening chronicle of a fervent, uncompromising life devoted to “pure creativity”.’ Booklist ‘Insightful, well-researched…The book abounds in great stories and terrific movie trivia that will sate Lynch fans for years to come.’ Kirkus Reviews ‘If you expected a David Lynch biography to be just like any other biography, you've never seen a David Lynch movie…Fascinating.’ New York Times ‘David Lynch’s memoir illuminates the origins of his art...the humour and eccentricity of Mr Lynch’s own reminiscences and observations are the book’s main pleasure.’ The Economist ‘Lynch is the master of the perverse, the unsettling and the plain bonkers.’ Sunday Times ‘Reassuringly unconventional…Engrossing...Lynch writes like he speaks. He's disarmingly direct, cheerfully profane and prone to bursts of giddy enthusiasm.’ Big Issue ‘Captivating...Gives the reader a panoramic insight into Lynch's impressive oeuvre, with sufficient time left to explore Lynch's childhood and coming of age.’ Irish Independent on Sunday ‘An intimate, humanising self-portrait...This wonderful new book is the most comprehensive overview of the filmmaker’s life and career to date.’ Little White Lies ‘A unique reading experience; more experimental novel than straight up biography. Which is most welcome and entirely appropriate...An endlessly fascinating work that invites multiple readings.’ Future of the Force ‘A sunny, holistic portrait of a corn-fed American dreamer who simply likes to show his nightmares to the world. Lynch emerges from these pages as principled, flighty…He’s constantly chasing the next big idea.’ Guardian ‘Lynch has stories to spare and it may be that this is the closest most of us get to spending time in his company...The book is both salve and distraction. All but essential for Lynch fans.’ Bookmunch ‘A tantalising hybrid of biography and autobiography…Film buffs will delight in this compelling and illuminating memoir...Lynch casts aside his reticence to discuss his life and films in this wildly enjoyable, massive and bracingly candid memoir.’ Shelf Awareness ‘Offers countless new stories, even for Lynch fanatics…All is told with Lynch’s considerable charm.’ Australian Financial Review ‘Journalist Kristine McKenna maps a rich biography derived from extensive interviews…[and] Lynch jumps in second. This two-pronged approach creates an accurate timeline and intimate self-portrait, but it’s what happens in the space between that’s special: a man engaging not with his own mythology, but rather his own personhood.’ VICE ‘Fascinating insights into the director’s process.’ New York Times

  9. 5 out of 5

    Robin Bonne

    After reading this, I still don’t know how he made the baby from Eraserhead. Seriously though, any of the real questions I had were left unanswered. The criticisms about gender within Lynch’s movies were never addressed, though the treatment of his wives was quite telling in a parallel way. This wasn’t an inspiring memoir/biography for me, and the memories that were shared were less than interesting.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Seroxx83

    I’ve been a big fan of David lynch since forever, seen his movies and twin peaks multiple times! There’s just so many layers in his work, and the mood you get when watching is something else! So when this book came out, I just needed it! David is truly one of a kind,and getting the honor to learn a bit more about him and his journey was truly amazing!! ❤ I’ve been a big fan of David lynch since forever, seen his movies and twin peaks multiple times! There’s just so many layers in his work, and the mood you get when watching is something else! So when this book came out, I just needed it! David is truly one of a kind,and getting the honor to learn a bit more about him and his journey was truly amazing!! ❤️

  11. 5 out of 5

    Lee

    It's a hagiography, but surely you need no convincing. Despite the often gushing biography narrative, there are some doozy anecdotes. Marlon Brando drives round hungry but there's only a tomato and a banana in the fridge: not to worry, Marlon tucks in. (Bit of salt on the tomato, sorted.) There's something called a 'Chair Pull', the description of which is unmissable. He kisses Elizabeth Taylor but doesn't want to marry her. He collects dental implements. Plenty of great stuff on the films, with It's a hagiography, but surely you need no convincing. Despite the often gushing biography narrative, there are some doozy anecdotes. Marlon Brando drives round hungry but there's only a tomato and a banana in the fridge: not to worry, Marlon tucks in. (Bit of salt on the tomato, sorted.) There's something called a 'Chair Pull', the description of which is unmissable. He kisses Elizabeth Taylor but doesn't want to marry her. He collects dental implements. Plenty of great stuff on the films, with most of the players speaking at length, and some fantastic photos.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Serhiy

    У книги незвична структура: кожний розділ складається з двох частин, перша написана Крістін Маккенна як звичайна біографія, друга написана самим Лінчем як коментар до першої, де він щось доповнює, проянює або навіть заперечує. Попри таку подвійну оптику, книга не дуже допомагає збагнути Лінча. Типовий Лінч це щось таке: “Eraserhead is my most spiritual film, but no one has ever gotten that from it. The way it happened was I had these feelings, but I didn’t know what it really was about for me. So У книги незвична структура: кожний розділ складається з двох частин, перша написана Крістін Маккенна як звичайна біографія, друга написана самим Лінчем як коментар до першої, де він щось доповнює, проянює або навіть заперечує. Попри таку подвійну оптику, книга не дуже допомагає збагнути Лінча. Типовий Лінч це щось таке: “Eraserhead is my most spiritual film, but no one has ever gotten that from it. The way it happened was I had these feelings, but I didn’t know what it really was about for me. So I get out the Bible and start reading, and I’m reading along, reading along, and I come to this sentence and I say, ‘That’s exactly it.’ I can’t say which sentence it is, though.” Коротше кажучи, він не з тих людей, які легко відкривають свою душу, а якщо починають відкривати, то зупиняються на півдорозі. З книги можно дізнатись, як створювались фільми та арт-проекти Лінча, з ким він над ними працював, з якими труднощами стикався, але самі твори Лінч принципово не коментує. Джерела натхнення вам так просто теж ніхто не назве. Лінч не вдає з себе інтелектуала, або інтелегента, в якого замість біографії список прочитаної літератури. Ніяких улюблених фільмів та книг. За кількома обмовками можна здогадатися, що його улюблене кіно “Бульвар Сансет”, але це не певно. В іншому місці Лінч обмовиться, що його улубленний фільм Фелліні “8 ½”, але не більше. Колись він думав екранізувати “Перевтілення”, тож читав Кафку, але на цьому все. Лінч рідкісний випадок режисера, який прийшов у кіно з живопису. З дитинства він хотів стати художником, вчився в академіях за цим фахом, і продовжує малювати по сьогодення. Але що його до цього спонукало, він нам теж не розповість. Одного разу зауважить, що його вразила виставка Френсіса Бекона, але це не важко здогадатись і з його фільмів. Дитинство Лінча - розчарування психоаналітика. Він виріс в 50-х роках на Середньому Заході, батько за фахом був ентомологом і займався збереженням та охороною лісів, мати - вчителькою англійської. З обома батьками в Лінча були гарні стосунки до самої їхньої смерті, ніяких вам сімейних конфліктів. Хоча вони не завжди розуміли захоплення сина, але завжди підтримували його морально та фінансово. Лінч був товариським за характером і легко знаходив мову з однолітками, тож у школі теж проблем не мав. Опитані Маккенна друзі дитинства лінча щиро не розуміють, звідки походять химерні образи з його фільмів. І все це дуже добре, бо найгірше, що могло би статися - Лінч справді написав, про що його фільми. А так читач може відчути агентом Купером, який збирає уліки, і тоді помітить, що усміхнений мішок для трупів з “Твін Пікса” виник під враженням від філадельфійського моргу, а джойрайд з “Блакитного оксамиту” - від поїздки на машині з не зовсім притомним шкільним другом тощо. Врешті решт, іншої біографії Лінча поки не написано, тож всім зацікавленим варто її прочитати.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Neil Coulter

    “I’m gonna tell you a story.” Those are the first words David Keith Lynch says in this audio edition of his biography/memoir hybrid. And over the course of 13 CDs, that’s what he does—story after story, charting the shape of his life from childhood to the present. I don’t often listen to audiobooks (I find it much harder to focus on spoken words than on printed words), but when I learned that the audio version of Lynch’s book is read (in part) by Lynch himself, I thought that would probably be t “I’m gonna tell you a story.” Those are the first words David Keith Lynch says in this audio edition of his biography/memoir hybrid. And over the course of 13 CDs, that’s what he does—story after story, charting the shape of his life from childhood to the present. I don’t often listen to audiobooks (I find it much harder to focus on spoken words than on printed words), but when I learned that the audio version of Lynch’s book is read (in part) by Lynch himself, I thought that would probably be the best way to experience it. And though I have mixed feelings about the book, I still believe that listening to Lynch read it is far better than just reading the words on the page. Room to Dream is an odd book in its structure: Kristine McKenna writes biographical chapters about Lynch, and after each chapter, Lynch then writes his own response or reflection on that period of his life. Because of that format, Lynch himself isn’t a contributor to McKenna’s chapters (though she draws on interviews with just about everyone who has ever known or worked with Lynch), but what he says rarely contradicts or corrects McKenna’s sketches. I loved the first half of this book. Hearing Lynch tell stories about growing up in the 1950s and 60s in Montana, Idaho, Washington, and Virginia, is delightful. He has a fantastic memory, and he’s a great storyteller. He had a stable, loving family, a lot of good friends, and survived quite a few adventures. What became clear from listening to Lynch talk about his youth is that he has long had the ability to see both the shiny surface of life and the unsettling darkness underneath. The interesting thing is that his awareness of lingering darkness doesn’t at all take away from his pure pleasure in the shiny surface. He seems to be able to keep hold of all of that, and it drives him to joy rather than despair. I didn’t know a lot about Lynch’s early film career, so it was interesting to learn how Eraserhead transpired, and how he was then launched (by Mel Brooks, of all people) into Hollywood with The Elephant Man and then Dune. McKenna and Lynch also give a lot of behind-the-scenes information about Blue Velvet, including how Lynch first met Angelo Badalamenti, which would become one of the great director–composer collaborations. Making Blue Velvet is about the halfway point in this book, and I felt like after that, McKenna might as well have said, “And then Lynch made some more movies and stuff.” Because it’s somewhere around this part of the book that the narrative becomes very monotonous, going over minute details of movie-making but not giving us so much of the interesting stories. Lynch seems somewhat uninterested in talking very much about Twin Peaks (or maybe he feels he’s already told all those stories; which is probably true, and I already know a lot of those stories anyway). At first, as the book was growing more dull, I thought, “Maybe he just doesn’t feel as much like talking about things that happened more recently. Maybe they’re too close to have become great stories yet.” But as the book continued, I saw another possibility. I think that as Lynch has isolated himself more and more from “real life” and has arranged an everyday existence that is totally under his control, free of any demands on him that he hasn’t himself voluntarily accepted, he has lost the kind of life that makes great stories. I think the full realization of “the art life” that he has long pursued has drained him of the stories that initially brought him here. It’s sad and ironic. I almost feel bad for him by the end of the book—this “perfectly artistic” man who at the end of his life is living in a small outbuilding with blackout curtains permanently covering the windows, sleeping by himself on a twin bed, urinating in the sink, and having all meals delivered to him so he doesn’t have to do anything but “focus on his art.” The reason I don’t actually feel sad for him is that he has made some choices that I don’t respect at all. In his pursuit of the art life and, ironically, “finding the transcendent within” and world peace through transcendental meditation, he has left behind three wives and one partner, and his current wife is not very connected to him anymore (when she wanted to have children, he told her, “Why do you want children? Am I not enough for you? Well, if you want a child, then that’s up to you, but don’t expect me to be very involved with any of it.” She had a child and, true to his word, he disappeared into his work and pulled far away from the family.). His exes seem extraordinarily gracious toward him (and since all of them after the first one were the woman he left the previous one for, they certainly had some idea what they were getting into), but that doesn’t change the fact—unstated in the book, of course—that Lynch is a self-centered, immature person. Given all of this, I find it really sad to listen to Lynch’s multiple earnest pleas to all his listeners to “just get with the program” and start meditating because that’s the only way we’re going to end suffering and have world peace. My idea of non-suffering and peace does not involve breaking so many relationships and leaving hurt people in my trail. All of us make mistakes, of course, so I’m not demanding perfection of Lynch. But I would like to have seen some hint of sorrow, remorse, apology. In the current cultural climate, some remark like “You know, what I did to that woman was terrible, and I wish I would have made different choices” would be very appropriate. But there is none of that evident in this book. What does Lynch have to say to us in films when he has so broken away from real human community? As those poor choices add up, Lynch’s boyish charm begins to wear thin on me. I’m baffled by the way he can go from something terrible (“So I knew that I wanted to end our marriage”) to one of his trademark flippant responses (“But I was really in love with [the next woman], and it was so byootiful. It was just inncrredible.”). To me, the relentless pursuit of the “beautiful,” the pleasure in each situation as it happens, seemed rather thoughtless and shallow, perhaps even an escape from having to confront the difficulties of life. I also find his initial justification for transcendental meditation completely bizarre. As a teen, Lynch left his Christian church upbringing because he was frustrated with the hypocrisy he saw in the church. Later on, he discovers meditation, and with boyish glee proclaims that transcendental meditation is the real deal, because “get this, what it teaches us it that we should treat other people the way we’d like to be treated ourselves!” ?? He seems entirely unaware that what he’s just said is the words of Jesus (from Matthew 7:12), which Christians regard as “the golden rule.” I find Lynch to be a really odd spokesperson for meditation. When I was younger, I thought much more highly of Lynch and saw him as an intriguing, visionary auteur. This book has been a splash of cold water on that youthful idealism. It’s sad in a way, but probably for the best. I will always hold Twin Peaks close to my heart, and there are other Lynch projects I also enjoy a lot. But I can’t say that I’m a “David Lynch fan” in general. I’d like to have seen more thoughtfulness, intellectual growth, and a well-lived life. What I’ve seen instead is a very inwardly focused artist who has removed himself further and further from what makes not an “art life” but a “good life.” I pray that he will find the true healing and community that will bring him out of his “art life” and back into the world.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Randy

    WELCOME TO LYNCHLAND Everything you didn't know you wanted to know about David Lynch, his life, art and films. This is a fascinating and enlightening book. It helps of course if you're familiar with his movies (and his music) but even if you're not you should get a lot out of this read. You may come out the other side of this book a different person (and I'm only half-joking about that). Worst case, only your doppelganger will come out. ;) My love for and appreciation of his work have deepened, th WELCOME TO LYNCHLAND Everything you didn't know you wanted to know about David Lynch, his life, art and films. This is a fascinating and enlightening book. It helps of course if you're familiar with his movies (and his music) but even if you're not you should get a lot out of this read. You may come out the other side of this book a different person (and I'm only half-joking about that). Worst case, only your doppelganger will come out. ;) My love for and appreciation of his work have deepened, thanks to this reading experience. Kristine McKenna has a clear and engaging voice, and Lynch's chapters are --what else?-- Lynchian. This is a wonderful book. I could say a lot more but this woodsman's at my door asking, "Gotta light?"

  15. 4 out of 5

    Carolyn

    For people who love to read how artist, actors, and writer's grew, struggled, fought heaven and hell to be as famous as they have become, this book is for them. David Lynch has been a terrific writer and famous for his share of the TV Show Twin Peaks. I won this in a goodreads giveaway and I'm thankful to Random house and Goodreads for letting me enjoy this bio. memoir told by Lynch and his friends. Good Read.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Sean Kennedy

    I loved the formatting of this memoir - McKenna does your standard biographical text with interviews of those who knew Lynch, and Lynch responds to it with his own version of events. The devil is in the details, and Lynch is as Lynch as Lynch can be in his responses.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Michael Lisk

    Of course, there are plenty of great anecdotes throughout, but the pile-up of compliments begins to grate about 300 pages in. We get it! David Lynch is a great guy! "Saint David" might have been a more appropriate title.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Daniel

    Absolutely a must read for Lynch fans. Totally absorbing. That said, it’s kind of hard to imagine anyone without a lot of admiration for and knowledge of Lynch loving this. For everyone else, an incredible read. Truly an original American voice which, for all kinds of reasons (discussed here in oblique and not so oblique terms) seems harder and harder to come by. Lots of insights but no definitive answers; this is a David Lynch (semi) autobiography after all.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Tasha Robinson

    Reviewed this one here for NPR Books. But here's the short version: I learned a lot about David Lynch's personal history from this book, and especially about his habit of ending long-term relationships by taking up with a new woman behind the old one's back, then eventually telling the previous one that their marriage (or in Isabella Rossellini's case, relationship) was over. It bothered me a bit that he romanticizes this process as "Then I fell in love with so-and-so, it was amazing," but on th Reviewed this one here for NPR Books. But here's the short version: I learned a lot about David Lynch's personal history from this book, and especially about his habit of ending long-term relationships by taking up with a new woman behind the old one's back, then eventually telling the previous one that their marriage (or in Isabella Rossellini's case, relationship) was over. It bothered me a bit that he romanticizes this process as "Then I fell in love with so-and-so, it was amazing," but on the other hand, it's also hard to feel for the women, given that they all went behind their predecessors' backs, and then were cheated on in return. That aside, I learned a lot from this book about Lynch's general process of following his visions, focusing on the details, and not worrying overmuch about meaning or metaphor. Which means this book is pretty useless for unpacking any given Lynch film and understanding it better, but it's really enjoyable in terms of set stories about Lynch holding up an entire cast and crew for a day while he tried to capture a shadow to his liking, or keeping people waiting while he stacked coffee beans in an corner of a set that would never appear onscreen, because it felt right. Unsurprisingly, Lynch's worldview is going to strike most people as odd — he dismisses the popularity of Twin Peaks as unimportant, while enthusing over the failure of Dune because it taught him important lessons — but there are certainly a lot of short, crisp anecdotes here about what it's like to operate inside it, both from Lynch's perspective and from the perspective of those who've worked with him over the years.

  20. 4 out of 5

    3 no 7

    “Room to Dream” by David Lynch and Kristine McKenna is structured as a conversation about his life with the reader. This book is a storyteller at his best, recalling the stories of his life, the events that made him the complex person that he is. Readers want to know every detail. He pulls us into his life as he pulls us into his movies, and his stories, like his movies, are full of enlightenment cloaked in dark humor. Lynch grew up in a small town, and with the usual middle-class experiences. He “Room to Dream” by David Lynch and Kristine McKenna is structured as a conversation about his life with the reader. This book is a storyteller at his best, recalling the stories of his life, the events that made him the complex person that he is. Readers want to know every detail. He pulls us into his life as he pulls us into his movies, and his stories, like his movies, are full of enlightenment cloaked in dark humor. Lynch grew up in a small town, and with the usual middle-class experiences. He was an Eagle Scout, had supportive parents, and experienced a degree of freedom unimaginable today. Despite this, his childhood memories are a mixture of darkness and light. The book contains Lynch’s personal recollections as well as comments and memories from childhood friends, family members and friends. The language and narrative construction is casual and friendly as if sitting with friends reminiscing about old times. His remarkable descriptive style makes every day run of the mill experiences compelling and interesting, but there is always that dark undertone to his life stories as there is in his movies. I received a copy of “Room to Dream” from David Lynch, Kristine McKenna, Random House, and NetGalley. The book is a collection of little personal stories rather than a litany of accomplishments. It also includes the background of society and news of the time to frame his recollections to put them in social context. Lynch’s friendly narrative style paints vivid pictures of everyday occurrences that put the reader right there beside him. I absolutely recommend this book.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Matheus Borges

    This book is like spending an afternoon with an old relative and listening to his stories, the same stories he's already told you a million times. You're so familiar with these anecdotes you know all the pauses, all the analogies and punchlines your old relative has perfected over the years to make the stories more entertaining. Despite this, you keep your mouth shut and listen to them one more time because you love him.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Kim

    Wow what a read this is. I was completely enthralled and entranced. Being a big fan of David Lynch's work I was very excited to read this new biography/memoir hybrid. The design of the book works really well and everything flows naturally. The biography portions were lovingly written by Kristine McKenna and then are followed by memoir portions written by David Lynch himself. This is a beautiful package of knowledge.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Chris

    Biografieën van nog levende beroemdheden die zélf nog iets mee in de pap te brokken hebben, moet je altijd met een flinke korrel zout nemen. Toch is net het mooie aan deze biografie dat elk hoofdstuk uit twee delen bestaat: het eerste deel is telkens de door Kristine McKenna geschreven, chronologische biografie die voornamelijk is samengesteld uit en opgebouwd rond gesprekken met mensen uit Lynch's omgeving, zowel familiaal als professioneel. In elk tweede deel levert David Lynch zelf commentaar Biografieën van nog levende beroemdheden die zélf nog iets mee in de pap te brokken hebben, moet je altijd met een flinke korrel zout nemen. Toch is net het mooie aan deze biografie dat elk hoofdstuk uit twee delen bestaat: het eerste deel is telkens de door Kristine McKenna geschreven, chronologische biografie die voornamelijk is samengesteld uit en opgebouwd rond gesprekken met mensen uit Lynch's omgeving, zowel familiaal als professioneel. In elk tweede deel levert David Lynch zelf commentaar op die biografie, vult aan, spreekt tegen en/of geeft zijn eigen interpretatie van de gebeurtenissen. 'Room to dream' bouwt na de ruim behandelde kinder- en studentenjaren vooral op per gedraaide film van Lynch (tot en met 'Twin Peaks - The Return' uit 2017), maar toont allengs steeds duidelijker aan dat de man al sinds zijn kunstopleiding altijd in de eerste plaats beeldend kunstenaar is geweest ... en daarnaast ook fotograaf én meubelontwerper én studio-muzikant én ambassadeur voor transcendentale meditatie én wegbereider van vele carrières. En wat die korrel zout betreft: na het lezen van de getuigenissen van de eindeloze lijst acteurs en crew-leden die sinds 'Eraserhead' (1977) aan zijn filmprojecten hebben meegewerkt en die stuk voor stuk niet anders dan (haast tot vervelens toe) met lof spreken over het geduld, de persoonlijke aandacht, de humor, de combinatie van het zelfbewuste en het intuïtieve en het aimabele feelgood-gehalte waarmee Lynch dag in dag uit op de set verschijnt, moet je wel geloven dat het waar is. Als fan sinds het eerste Twin Peaks-seizoen heb ik (op drie na) al zijn films gezien en ik kreeg veel zin om ze opnieuw te bekijken. Niet omdat ik ze nu beter zou begrijpen. Wie zijn oeuvre kent, weet dat begrijpelijkheid bij Lynch ondergeschikt is aan de sfeer, klank en beeldtaal en hij reikt je uiteraard nergens sleutels aan in dit boek. Waarom dan wel? Omdat je er - zoals hij zelf ergens zegt - net als bij beeldende kunst elke keer andere, nieuwe dingen in kan zien en ontdekken. Deze biografie, met al zijn anekdotes en commentaren rond het ontstaansproces van zijn oeuvre, was voor mij dus vooral een smaakmakertje om me de komende maanden opnieuw in zijn duistere beeldenwereld onder te dompelen. En voor wie het interesseert: eind november exposeert hij in het Bonnefantenmuseum in Maastricht met de tentoonstelling: 'Someone is in my house'.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Joshua

    What is a dream, and when it's gone what exactly did we actually possess or witness? Only David Lynch would co-write a book like this. Room to dream is both a biography and a memoir as Kristine McKenna writes passages of his life which are then followed by lynch's reaction to those passages sprinkled with his own thoughts, memories, musings, and dreams. And the effect upon the reader is a kind of dream as they receive this book passively, while feeling these moments more often than actually readi What is a dream, and when it's gone what exactly did we actually possess or witness? Only David Lynch would co-write a book like this. Room to dream is both a biography and a memoir as Kristine McKenna writes passages of his life which are then followed by lynch's reaction to those passages sprinkled with his own thoughts, memories, musings, and dreams. And the effect upon the reader is a kind of dream as they receive this book passively, while feeling these moments more often than actually reading them. David Lynch as an artist has impacted the cultural landscape in profound ways, and even if one does not like the man's work, they have likely experienced or enjoyed the work of someone who has been touched by the man's unique aesthetic. As an artist Lynch has relied completely upon his own vision and that honesty and integrity of spirit is probably why the man appeals to me as much as he does. This book was a chance to see not just the maker of films like Eraserhead, Muholland Drive, Lost Highway, and Twin Peaks, it was a chance to see the humanity of a great artist. Lynch appears in this book, through the many interviews as well as his own testimony, as a kind hearted man who's driven solely by a desire to make art. Rather than pursue narratives that would benefit him economically, he's constantly chosen a path of his own making. The reader is sure to observe as I did that Lynch was not always kind, particularly to his wives of which there were four of them, but these faults do an important job of humanizing him which is ultimately the point of a biography. By the end of a book about someone's life the reader should not walk away with the image of the person as a kind of saint. They should see the person's eccentricities, faults, dreams, ambitions, and ultimately their effect and response to the culture they lived in. Room to Dream does just that, and by the end I felt a deeper understanding of Lynch as an artist, and even more so as a human driven by passion. Take a step through the curtain chief, and hold on tight. The dream is weird and strange and wonderful, but it'll take you places you would never see anywhere else.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Christopher Beckett

    It will come as no surprise to those familiar with the work of artist and filmmaker David Lynch that his approach to an autobiography would be unconventional. Each chapter of Room to Dream is actually two. In the first, Kristine McKenna has crafted a conventional biography of Lynch, with all of the dates, stats, and interviews with collaborators, friends, and family. In the second, Lynch himself muses on the period and work that McKenna has covered, giving his own perspective and honing in on th It will come as no surprise to those familiar with the work of artist and filmmaker David Lynch that his approach to an autobiography would be unconventional. Each chapter of Room to Dream is actually two. In the first, Kristine McKenna has crafted a conventional biography of Lynch, with all of the dates, stats, and interviews with collaborators, friends, and family. In the second, Lynch himself muses on the period and work that McKenna has covered, giving his own perspective and honing in on the details (and often digressions) that interest him the most. It’s a striking approach to this kind of book, satisfying two different kinds of readers (and maybe creating a third). All of Lynch’s major works, from his avant-garde debut Eraserhead, to the blockbuster disaster Dune, to the mainstream breakthrough of the Twin Peaks TV series, and beyond, are covered in detail. Given how dark Lynch’s films can be, it may be surprising to some readers to find what a positive, loving book this is, both in the overwhelming affection the interviewees have for the man, and in his own enchantment with the creative process. Even his ex-wives speak in glowing terms, though Lynch’s faults in that department are not skirted, especially in the case of his bizarre break-up with actress Isabella Rossellini. Refreshingly, Lynch allows them their say and does not turn his sections of the book into a he-said-she-said showdown. Room to Dream is a unique trip, sure to delight any fan of Lynch’s work, and probably pique the curiosity of anyone else who gives it a chance.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Richard Gray

    3.5 leaning towards 4 maybe? If you're expecting to find out how the baby was made in Eraserhead or the nature of the rift between him and Michael J. Anderson, you should look elsewhere. "This book is a chronicle of things that happened," the authors explain in the introduction, "not an explanation of what those things means." They put it more succinctly elsewhere: it's "a person having a conversation with his own biography." Both of these things seem like an intriguing prospect individually, and 3.5 leaning towards 4 maybe? If you're expecting to find out how the baby was made in Eraserhead or the nature of the rift between him and Michael J. Anderson, you should look elsewhere. "This book is a chronicle of things that happened," the authors explain in the introduction, "not an explanation of what those things means." They put it more succinctly elsewhere: it's "a person having a conversation with his own biography." Both of these things seem like an intriguing prospect individually, and together they make are far more interesting tome that either separately. The films and art of David Lynch have been covered in innumerable places over the years. Biographer Kristine McKenna acknowledges this in her chronological account of his life and career. On some level, this is an excuse to never get terribly deep on any one topic, glossing over the details in favour of numerous interview and anecdotes. That said, McKenna gathers an impressive number of actors and crew from Lynch's crew. However, it's really all context for Lynch himself to write a response chapter to each of McKenna's summaries. Lynch is even lighter in his touch, often adding not much more that "he or she was great! Gosh just great!" to events. Having said the balance of McKenna/Lynch's approaches gives us more than either of them could alone. Lynch's Midwestern charm is also contagious, and you get a sense of what his artistic mind considers to be the important details of the production. Sometimes its meeting a person, and others its the coffee or burgers he ate every day. Neither McKenna or Lynch seem as interested in the details in later chapters as they were in the beginning. McKenna repeatedly talks about Lynch getting distracted by other things, and perhaps that was just setup for his approach to this very tome. Still, Lynch devotees are sure to dig hearing his thoughts on all of his productions, including some nice tidbits on the most recent season of Twin Peaks.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Andrew

    Thoroughly enjoyed this (auto)biography. Initially I wasn't keen on the tone of Kristine's prose but actually it complements Lynch's style well, and the overlapping points of view tell much about memory and the importance adhered to different facts from different perspectives. I hadn't realised Lynch was so prolific in other fields, and the dichotomy of his geniality coupled with the sometimes cavalier way he treated his lovers rendered him affectionately childlike and confirmed the importance t Thoroughly enjoyed this (auto)biography. Initially I wasn't keen on the tone of Kristine's prose but actually it complements Lynch's style well, and the overlapping points of view tell much about memory and the importance adhered to different facts from different perspectives. I hadn't realised Lynch was so prolific in other fields, and the dichotomy of his geniality coupled with the sometimes cavalier way he treated his lovers rendered him affectionately childlike and confirmed the importance to him of his art (as a writer I completely understand how I would prioritize my fiction above everything, including family, so this alignment makes perfect sense). About two thirds of the way it gets bogged down with facts as Lynch enters a less interesting period, but then it picks up again and overall it was a great read. There are only a couple of Lynch features I haven't seen (nor - shamefully - the second and third series of Twin Peaks) but this work makes me want to address that. Highly recommend.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Marie

    Absolutely fascinating and gives such an enormous insight into the artistic life Lynch has lead. Listened to the audiobook and loved the slow comforting sound of Lynch not really narrating a book, rather just telling stories of his life. Found it interesting as well as a twist on a memoir, and how unfulfilling even a very good biography can be, as the parts by McKenna are, when compared with the juxtaposition of the subject himself thinking of the same parts of his life. Reading this has spurred Absolutely fascinating and gives such an enormous insight into the artistic life Lynch has lead. Listened to the audiobook and loved the slow comforting sound of Lynch not really narrating a book, rather just telling stories of his life. Found it interesting as well as a twist on a memoir, and how unfulfilling even a very good biography can be, as the parts by McKenna are, when compared with the juxtaposition of the subject himself thinking of the same parts of his life. Reading this has spurred me to round out the holes in my Lynch watchings and have made me an even bigger fan.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Krista

    If you are a David Lynch fan then this is a must. If you are into art and movies this is still a great book for you. It's interesting and I appreciated the artist's train of thought. I listened to the audiobook and it was nice to hear David Lynch tell his story. If you think you know David Lynch and you haven't read this book yet then you don't know him.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Kevin

    Filmmaker David Lynch notoriously eludes talking about his work, so a nearly 600-page memoir is quite a surprise. In an effort to create a definitive biography, Lynch and coauthor Kristine McKenna have produced ROOM TO DREAM , a tantalizing hybrid of biography and autobiography. McKenna, who interviewed more than 100 people, writes the straightforward biography chapters offering perspectives from ex-wives, producers, cast and crew members. A chapter by Lynch follows, elaborating on the preceding Filmmaker David Lynch notoriously eludes talking about his work, so a nearly 600-page memoir is quite a surprise. In an effort to create a definitive biography, Lynch and coauthor Kristine McKenna have produced ROOM TO DREAM , a tantalizing hybrid of biography and autobiography. McKenna, who interviewed more than 100 people, writes the straightforward biography chapters offering perspectives from ex-wives, producers, cast and crew members. A chapter by Lynch follows, elaborating on the preceding material, sometimes disagreeing but always offering colorful extra details. The clever back-and-forth concept creates a more panoramic view than most biographies achieve. Lynch's first feature-length film, "Eraserhead", took five years to complete and became a midnight movie favorite that caught the eye of Mel Brooks. Brooks hired him to helm "The Elephant Man" and it became a surprise mainstream hit, earning Lynch two Oscar nominations. His next film, an adaptation of Frank Herbert's "Dune", was a critical and box office disaster. "Failure is a beautiful thing," writes Lynch, "because when the dust settles there's nowhere to go but up, and it's a freedom." That freedom allowed him to create "Blue Velvet", "Twin Peaks", "Wild at Heart", "Mulholland Drive", "Inland Empire" and other quirky projects. Lynch is a maverick filmmaker who has found popularity by staying true to his often warped and disturbing vision of the world. ROOM TO DREAM shares where those ideas came from, but it also celebrates his decades-long friendships and his love of romance. Film buffs will delight in this compelling and illuminating memoir. Filmmaker David Lynch casts aside his reticence to discuss his life and films in this wildly enjoyable, massive and bracingly candid memoir.

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