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The Frame-Up

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When Sargent Singer discovers that the paintings in his father’s gallery are alive, he is pulled into a captivating world behind the frame that he never knew existed. Filled with shady characters, devious plots, and a grand art heist, this inventive mystery-adventure celebrates art and artists and is perfect for fans of Night at the Museum and Blue Balliett’s Chasing Vermee When Sargent Singer discovers that the paintings in his father’s gallery are alive, he is pulled into a captivating world behind the frame that he never knew existed. Filled with shady characters, devious plots, and a grand art heist, this inventive mystery-adventure celebrates art and artists and is perfect for fans of Night at the Museum and Blue Balliett’s Chasing Vermeer. There’s one important rule at the Beaverbrook Gallery—don’t let anyone know the paintings are alive. Mona Dunn, forever frozen at thirteen when her portrait was painted by William Orpen, has just broken that rule. Luckily twelve-year-old Sargent Singer, an aspiring artist himself, is more interested in learning about the vast and intriguing world behind the frame than he is in sharing her secret. And when Mona and Sargent suspect shady dealings are happening behind the scenes at the gallery, they set out to find the culprit. They must find a way to save the gallery—and each other—before they are lost forever. With an imaginative setting, lots of intrigue, and a thoroughly engaging cast of characters, The Frame-Up will captivate readers of Jacqueline West’s The Books of Elsewhere. Includes a 16-page full-color insert showcasing the real paintings featured in the book.


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When Sargent Singer discovers that the paintings in his father’s gallery are alive, he is pulled into a captivating world behind the frame that he never knew existed. Filled with shady characters, devious plots, and a grand art heist, this inventive mystery-adventure celebrates art and artists and is perfect for fans of Night at the Museum and Blue Balliett’s Chasing Vermee When Sargent Singer discovers that the paintings in his father’s gallery are alive, he is pulled into a captivating world behind the frame that he never knew existed. Filled with shady characters, devious plots, and a grand art heist, this inventive mystery-adventure celebrates art and artists and is perfect for fans of Night at the Museum and Blue Balliett’s Chasing Vermeer. There’s one important rule at the Beaverbrook Gallery—don’t let anyone know the paintings are alive. Mona Dunn, forever frozen at thirteen when her portrait was painted by William Orpen, has just broken that rule. Luckily twelve-year-old Sargent Singer, an aspiring artist himself, is more interested in learning about the vast and intriguing world behind the frame than he is in sharing her secret. And when Mona and Sargent suspect shady dealings are happening behind the scenes at the gallery, they set out to find the culprit. They must find a way to save the gallery—and each other—before they are lost forever. With an imaginative setting, lots of intrigue, and a thoroughly engaging cast of characters, The Frame-Up will captivate readers of Jacqueline West’s The Books of Elsewhere. Includes a 16-page full-color insert showcasing the real paintings featured in the book.

30 review for The Frame-Up

  1. 5 out of 5

    Casey Lyall

    This book was so much fun! Who hasn't wondered if the people in paintings are all shenaniganizing behind our backs. THE FRAME-UP takes that question and runs with it, spinning a tale full of good humour and delightful adventure. I loved the balance of the two POVs between Mona and Sargent. The build-up of their friendship wove seamlessly between their storylines. I'm a sucker for family and friendship drama as well which was happening in front of and behind the frames. A fair bit of Canadiana and This book was so much fun! Who hasn't wondered if the people in paintings are all shenaniganizing behind our backs. THE FRAME-UP takes that question and runs with it, spinning a tale full of good humour and delightful adventure. I loved the balance of the two POVs between Mona and Sargent. The build-up of their friendship wove seamlessly between their storylines. I'm a sucker for family and friendship drama as well which was happening in front of and behind the frames. A fair bit of Canadiana and art history also cropped up among the descriptions of the vivid life of the paintings' residents which I found just as interesting as the actual plot! And...AND!!!! The twist at the end is one of my favourite things ever. I found myself *hoping* something like it would happen, but when it did - there was cheering. It was a treat to have the opportunity to read an advance copy of this story.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Melissa

    I had the pleasure of receiving an ARC of Wendy McLeod MacKnight’s much-awaited MG novel THE FRAME-UP, in exchange for an honest review. In this charming middle-grade mystery, we meet Mona Dunn, a 13-year-old girl from a wealthy family who happens to be live inside a painting, the eponymous Mona Dunn, at the Beaverbrook Art Gallery, in Fredericton, New Brunswick, Canada. Mona, who is very much alive despite the fact that she was painted in 1915, shares wall space with other “residents” of famous I had the pleasure of receiving an ARC of Wendy McLeod MacKnight’s much-awaited MG novel THE FRAME-UP, in exchange for an honest review. In this charming middle-grade mystery, we meet Mona Dunn, a 13-year-old girl from a wealthy family who happens to be live inside a painting, the eponymous Mona Dunn, at the Beaverbrook Art Gallery, in Fredericton, New Brunswick, Canada. Mona, who is very much alive despite the fact that she was painted in 1915, shares wall space with other “residents” of famous paintings, including the Cotterell family, Helena Rubinstein, W. Somerset Maugham, and the founder of the gallery himself, Lord Beaverbrook (aka Max Aitken). Meanwhile, the gallery director’s son, 13-year-old Sargent Singer, discovers that the paintings are alive but doesn’t know what to do with this enormous, hard-to-fathom secret. He also doesn’t know how to handle the possibility that Mr. Sneely, the creepy art restorer brought in to work magic on Merrymaking, might be an art forger and involved in an elaborate art heist. With lively characters, oodles of intrigue, and a fast-paced plot, THE FRAME-UP is a middle-grade masterpiece! Highly recommended.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Laura Shovan

    I just finished Wendy McLeod MacKnight's THE FRAME UP. It's about a real art gallery in Canada, The Beaverbrook. The paintings there have a secret (in the novel), they are alive. A painting of a 13 year old girl named Mona Dunn (real painting) is accidentally found out by the 12 year old son of the gallery director and they become friends. It's a fun story, and WOW, the author does an amazing job of creating characters for the paintings, imagining the constraints, limitations, and frustrations o I just finished Wendy McLeod MacKnight's THE FRAME UP. It's about a real art gallery in Canada, The Beaverbrook. The paintings there have a secret (in the novel), they are alive. A painting of a 13 year old girl named Mona Dunn (real painting) is accidentally found out by the 12 year old son of the gallery director and they become friends. It's a fun story, and WOW, the author does an amazing job of creating characters for the paintings, imagining the constraints, limitations, and frustrations of the magic that makes them real. An exciting climax will keep kids turning pages, and the story's resolution is absolute perfection. Final book will include full color reproductions of the key paintings!

  4. 4 out of 5

    Kathie

    What a great read! The Beaverbrook Art Gallery has a secret...the painting are alive, and the residents have a set of rules they must strictly follow so gallery visitors do not uncover their secret. But when one rule is broken, followed by several more, the impact on everyone involved is life-changing. I love that this book is based on actual art (and picture of the paintings whose characters are alive in the book are included at the front, which really adds to the story), and sparks the reader to What a great read! The Beaverbrook Art Gallery has a secret...the painting are alive, and the residents have a set of rules they must strictly follow so gallery visitors do not uncover their secret. But when one rule is broken, followed by several more, the impact on everyone involved is life-changing. I love that this book is based on actual art (and picture of the paintings whose characters are alive in the book are included at the front, which really adds to the story), and sparks the reader to think about paintings in a new way. There’s a mystery solve, but important growth for the characters, too. I’d love to travel to New Brunswick and have Wendy McLeod MacKnight give me one of her special museum tours. If this book isn’t in your TBR yet, please add it.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Lila

    What a fun book about a boy who, as he spends the summer with his father, discovers something magical about the gallery that his father runs. In this world, the subjects of the paintings are alive and move and interact with each other. But they must never interact with the humans who visit the gallery, that is strictly forbidden! Fortunately both the humans and the paintings, rules are made to be broken. Young Sargent Singer discovers the secret of the paintings and manages to show them some of What a fun book about a boy who, as he spends the summer with his father, discovers something magical about the gallery that his father runs. In this world, the subjects of the paintings are alive and move and interact with each other. But they must never interact with the humans who visit the gallery, that is strictly forbidden! Fortunately both the humans and the paintings, rules are made to be broken. Young Sargent Singer discovers the secret of the paintings and manages to show them some of our modern world. This was a fun, imaginative book with an artistic slant!

  6. 5 out of 5

    Kaytee Lurz

    One perk of being a teacher is that you have an excuse to read kids’ books! A friend, who is a reading specialist recommended this book to me. I have to confess, I loved this book more than I expected, and couldn’t put it down. I am an art teacher, so a book about paintings that come to life (think Harry Potter) combined with an art forgery/art theft mystery, and art history was irresistible. The adult and kid characters were very well written, and relatable. I loved that the paintings that came One perk of being a teacher is that you have an excuse to read kids’ books! A friend, who is a reading specialist recommended this book to me. I have to confess, I loved this book more than I expected, and couldn’t put it down. I am an art teacher, so a book about paintings that come to life (think Harry Potter) combined with an art forgery/art theft mystery, and art history was irresistible. The adult and kid characters were very well written, and relatable. I loved that the paintings that came to life and became characters are reproduced in the front of the book, and are all real paintings. There were so many layers to the story, and it felt magical and yet real at the same time.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Miche

    If you like middle-grade novels and you are an art lover, you should pick-up The Frame-Up from Wendy McLeod MacKnight. I simply LOVED everything about this book: the characters, the art, the setting, the plot. In my opinion, it is an amazing way to get kids interested in art! When I get the chance to visit Fredericton, I will for sure stop at the Beaverbrook Gallery to say hello to my new friends. :)

  8. 5 out of 5

    Phaea Crede

    Interesting story, FABULOUS ENDING!

  9. 4 out of 5

    Janet

    I was fortunate to read this one shortly after Ms. MacKnight signed the deal with her publisher. I was instantly enchanted with the world she created, and now I have the urgent desire to go to the Beaverbrook Art Gallery. When Sargent goes to spend time with his father, who happens to be the curator for the Beaverbrook Art Gallery, he is not happy about it . . . until he discovers a whole hidden world right there in the museum. The subjects in the paintings can move! They can talk! They can jump I was fortunate to read this one shortly after Ms. MacKnight signed the deal with her publisher. I was instantly enchanted with the world she created, and now I have the urgent desire to go to the Beaverbrook Art Gallery. When Sargent goes to spend time with his father, who happens to be the curator for the Beaverbrook Art Gallery, he is not happy about it . . . until he discovers a whole hidden world right there in the museum. The subjects in the paintings can move! They can talk! They can jump from painting to painting! This world is secret, and only the curator is supposed to know, so Sargent promises Mona Dunn (a young girl in one of the paintings) that he will keep the secret. Their friendship opens new and exciting worlds to both of them. But when the art restorer arrives, and strange things start happening in the art world, Sargent and Mona have to solve the mystery before it's too late. I found this book so clever and fun! I loved the mystery, and the writing and characters pulled me in. I was so sad when the book ended, but so satisfied with the ending. This book deals with disappointments, working hard for what we enjoy, and appreciating people for exactly who they are. I won't spoil anything, but I highly recommend this book!

  10. 5 out of 5

    Rebecca

    Mona Dunn has an unusual life, to be sure. Painted in 1915 at age 13, she now lives at the Beaverbrook Gallery and spends her days sitting still and listening to visitors, and her nights running around and visiting other paintings, along with all the other residents of the other paintings. The one big rule for the gallery residents is that the people outside the frame must never know they are alive. Sargent Singer is going to spend the summer with his father, the director of the Beaverbrook Galle Mona Dunn has an unusual life, to be sure. Painted in 1915 at age 13, she now lives at the Beaverbrook Gallery and spends her days sitting still and listening to visitors, and her nights running around and visiting other paintings, along with all the other residents of the other paintings. The one big rule for the gallery residents is that the people outside the frame must never know they are alive. Sargent Singer is going to spend the summer with his father, the director of the Beaverbrook Gallery. After his parents divorced, Sargent rarely saw his father, and from things he's overheard, isn't sure his father really loves him. Sargent does love art, though, and is a talented painter so he's very interested in the gallery. And when he sees Mona Dunn stick her tongue out as an offensive visitor leaves, Sargent's life--as well as the lives of all the people in the paintings--is turned upside down. Lord Beaverbrook (behind the frame) tries to hold iron control over the gallery residents, but some are frustrated by his restrictions and start breaking rules. Adding to the problems, an officious art restorer is working at the gallery, and an offensive potential donor is hanging around and causing Isaac Singer--Sargent's father--to ignore Sargent even more. As Sargent and Mona become fast friends, events start moving faster and faster both behind and in front of the frame. If they don't act quickly, it could be the end of the gallery--and perhaps the end of some of the paintings. I loved this! It had a great start, and I really loved that while I've read other books in which characters go into paintings or other artworks, in this one it's as much about the lives of the people in the paintings as it is about the characters on the outside--usually it's all about the kids on the outside. Not this one. The characters were all layered and memorable, as were their relationships and issues. I loved that the book was evenly divided between some more typically realistic-fiction passages about Sargent and his father and Sargent and Mona's friendship, and the mystery-adventure parts (though the denouement ran a bit long). I loved that I didn't know what was really going on--I couldn't figure it out and I love being surprised. I did guess one thing that happened in the end, but really, if you couldn't guess it you weren't paying attention from page 1. This is a complex book with lots of characters and lots going on, but the author handles the reins deftly and fills the book with wonderful detail as well as characters. When you read it, be sure to go to the Beaverbrook Gallery site for the book (http://beaverbrookartgallery.org/en/v...) so you can see all the paintings. I can't wait to booktalk this one! Forgot to say--I can't recommend the audiobook version of this. Bronson Pinchot seems to be trying to imitate Jim Dale and give every character a different, quirky voice, and it just doesn't work. The female characters all sound like lispy, breathy bimbos whether age 11 or 35 or 78, and a lot of the preteen boys sound like lifetime-smoker grandpas trying to be "cool with the kids' lingo" in deep, gravelly voices. Everyone sounded like a cartoon character. Didn't work.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Ms. Yingling

    E ARC provided by Edelweiss Plus Nora has been in a painting in the Beaverbrook Gallery for over 100 years. The characters in paintings can come alive, but they are careful not to let humans know about this. They have social events, visit, and generally have a good time. When paintings are due to be restored at the gallery, the residents are less than thrilled, because it means time spent in a dark workshop away from their friends. The manager of the gallery, Isaac Singer, is having his son visit E ARC provided by Edelweiss Plus Nora has been in a painting in the Beaverbrook Gallery for over 100 years. The characters in paintings can come alive, but they are careful not to let humans know about this. They have social events, visit, and generally have a good time. When paintings are due to be restored at the gallery, the residents are less than thrilled, because it means time spent in a dark workshop away from their friends. The manager of the gallery, Isaac Singer, is having his son visit for the summer. Sargent usually lives with his mother and stepfather, and doesn't get along terribly well with his father. He is, however, a talented painter, so not sad about spending the summer at the gallery and attending the camps there. On the plane, he meets Mr. Sneely, who is going to be restoring the paintings. Sneely is not the most pleasant man, and Sargent is glad he doesn't have to spend a lot of time with him. When Sargent sees Nora in another painting, he thinks at first that he is hallucinating, but when another incident occurs, Nora speaks to him and tells him the secrets of the paintings. He agrees to keep the secret, even though the gallery needs money badly. He gets to know the residents of the paintings, and even arranges for them to watch movies, which they love. One of the residents, Dusk, seems to be involved in something (ahem) shady, and Sneely is also suspicious. Nora and Sargent start to worry that copies are being made of the paintings, and that this will mean something bad for the originals. Sargent also finds out secrets about his father's past, and learns to get along with him, thanks in part to Janice, his father's fiance. Can Nora and Sargent prevent tragedy from befalling the Beaverbrook Collection? Strengths: This was an innovative use of characters in paintings, and the addition of the actual art at the beginning of the book was very helpful. The backstories, the rules, the way that the characters are able to travel between paintings-- all innovative and fun. I was even more intrigued with Sargent's story and his interaction with his father. There are a lot of children who don't know their noncustodial parents well, but there are not that many stories about this. All in all, a fresh premise with an intriguing mystery that moved quickly. Weaknesses: Art mysteries just do not move at my library. I love Runholdt's Kari and Lucas mysteries and Malone's The Sixty-Eight Rooms, but they just don't circulate. This was a lot like West's The Shadows which I also like; I think I've had two students read this series this year. What I really think: I will probably not purchase, even though I enjoyed it.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Munro's Kids

    This book was rather written for me, and hit me just at a time I had watched an art documentary. So I was pretty into it. I feel like your average civilian would give it a more modest 3 stars. The book pays a lot of homage to Harry Potter and the notion that pictures can be alive, move around, and visit other paintings. In this story, a young boy, Sargent, goes to spend the summer with his father, who is the head of a New Brunswick art museum, and quickly discovers that all the paintings are aliv This book was rather written for me, and hit me just at a time I had watched an art documentary. So I was pretty into it. I feel like your average civilian would give it a more modest 3 stars. The book pays a lot of homage to Harry Potter and the notion that pictures can be alive, move around, and visit other paintings. In this story, a young boy, Sargent, goes to spend the summer with his father, who is the head of a New Brunswick art museum, and quickly discovers that all the paintings are alive! He makes friends with a young girl (she has been a young girl for over a hundred years, since she was painted), Mona. Though Sargent is shocked by his discovery, he keeps it a secret. For her part, Mona is pleased to have a friend her age, but is preoccupied by the new and troubling developments in the gallery. Naturally, both characters get caught up in a mystery and unearth an art caper. I will say that the mystery wasn't much of one - I rarely solve these things, but I definitely saw it coming this time. I did like the the two main voices, and I LOVE that the gallery and all the art is real, and that I got full-colour replications of all the paintings in the book. I enjoyed the mix-up of modern and more classic art, and how the paintings came to life complete with their real-life personalities, and that they could inhabit other paintings. And that paintings can only come to life if they are real (not prints) and are done by an artist capable of imbuing them with real character and life. There was something quite delicious about the whole world that notion created, and I enjoyed jumping into it. Teachers will LOVE the real art history in the book and there are about a billion lesson plan ideas within it as a result. Admittedly, I'm a bit of an art history freak, so the book speaks to me more than it will others. But it is certainly fun and relatively unique - and Canadian! -Kirsten

  13. 5 out of 5

    Carolyn Menke

    Art that comes alive? I was hooked, and then swept in and spellbound by the distinct and charming voices of the very real people living within the gilded frames. Thirteen-year-old Mona, frozen in time as captured by her painter, crosses over to modern day to interact with a new friend, Sargent Singer, who is spending the summer with his father, an art director. Right away, the concept had me excited because of all the questions that came to mind. If Mona is immortal, what does that mean for her Art that comes alive? I was hooked, and then swept in and spellbound by the distinct and charming voices of the very real people living within the gilded frames. Thirteen-year-old Mona, frozen in time as captured by her painter, crosses over to modern day to interact with a new friend, Sargent Singer, who is spending the summer with his father, an art director. Right away, the concept had me excited because of all the questions that came to mind. If Mona is immortal, what does that mean for her friendship with Sargent, a boy who will continue to age? What happens if her painting is moved? Is she trapped forever? The "residents" who are alive in their respective world-renown works teach the reader much about getting along with others and what's really important in life, no matter what limitations that life might hold. I loved the mystery behind who was out for revenge and why and would they cost Sargent's father his job and the art their lives? But there's also a deeper contemporary issue the author tackles here, the strained relationship between Sargent and his divorced father, Issac, an art director, who has largely been absent from his life. I also appreciated that the book contains gorgeous pictures of the art that comes alive, and found myself paging back to study them, feeling their emotions. Next up is a roadtrip to the real Beaverbrook Art Gallery with my family to see the art in person (and perhaps have a discreet chat with Mona. These lips are sealed). I highly recommend.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Cynthia Reeg

    I had the opportunity to read an Advance Reader's Edition of this title. This is a truly clever story, woven with art, magic and issues from contemporary life. The setting itself is a bit magical, the Beaverbrook Art Gallery with its wide array of paintings—including a portrait of Mona Dunn, a thirteen-year-old from the early twentieth century. When twelve-year-old Sargent Singer arrives for a summer visit with his estranged father, he soon discovers the magic within the museum’s artwork and bef I had the opportunity to read an Advance Reader's Edition of this title. This is a truly clever story, woven with art, magic and issues from contemporary life. The setting itself is a bit magical, the Beaverbrook Art Gallery with its wide array of paintings—including a portrait of Mona Dunn, a thirteen-year-old from the early twentieth century. When twelve-year-old Sargent Singer arrives for a summer visit with his estranged father, he soon discovers the magic within the museum’s artwork and befriends Mona who has a life within the frame. As Sargent and Mona build their friendship, so too does Sargent learn to reach out to new contemporary friends he meets through the summer art program. He and his father make some progress toward repairing their rocky relationship but face complications when events put them at odds. Things also take a turn for the worse for Sargent and Mona when evil plans threaten to upend their friendship along with the museum’s artworks. The author has filled this story with great imagining, skillful plotting, and endearing characters. The mystery will keep readers turning the pages, and the ending will leave them filling more than satisfied. Highly recommended for middle grade readers who love mystery, magic, and an artfully grand read!

  15. 4 out of 5

    Shari

    I loved this book! The writing, the characters and the premise all came alive for me and even though some might think a book about art might be slow, this one was not. The pacing is great for kids and adults alike! Unbeknownst to the general populace, the characters in the paintings that the Beaverbrook Museum in New Brunswick, Canada are alive! The owner's son is eventually the only one in on the secret, and he sympathizes with their plight of being stuck in their paintings. The worldbuilding is I loved this book! The writing, the characters and the premise all came alive for me and even though some might think a book about art might be slow, this one was not. The pacing is great for kids and adults alike! Unbeknownst to the general populace, the characters in the paintings that the Beaverbrook Museum in New Brunswick, Canada are alive! The owner's son is eventually the only one in on the secret, and he sympathizes with their plight of being stuck in their paintings. The worldbuilding is extraordinary. It's rare that a world feels truly unique, but The Frame-Up expanded my heart and mind in this way! I highly recommend this for children, families and classrooms. I received an ARC of this book in exchange for an honest opinion.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Lisa Schmid

    The Frame-Up is a middle grade work of art! Using the backdrop of the Beaverbrook Art Gallery, located in Fredericton, New Brunswick, Canada author Wendy McLeod MacKnight paints a highly entertaining story that is both imaginative and fresh. Sargent Singer is estranged from his father and hopes to reconnect with him over summer vacation. Mona Dunn's portrait LIVES in the Beaverbrook Art Gallery (Think Harry Potter) and is looking for a little excitement and perhaps a new friend. Mona and Sargent' The Frame-Up is a middle grade work of art! Using the backdrop of the Beaverbrook Art Gallery, located in Fredericton, New Brunswick, Canada author Wendy McLeod MacKnight paints a highly entertaining story that is both imaginative and fresh. Sargent Singer is estranged from his father and hopes to reconnect with him over summer vacation. Mona Dunn's portrait LIVES in the Beaverbrook Art Gallery (Think Harry Potter) and is looking for a little excitement and perhaps a new friend. Mona and Sargent's develop a sweet friendship with undertones of romance. I was delighted with the story and how it plays out. To be honest, I wasn't sure how Ms. MacKnight would resolve the conflict between father and son, but the ending was brilliant. Bravo! More, please.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Jenn Bishop

    What an incredible book! I was already a fan of this author from her previous book, but this one blew me out of the water. The concept alone will sell it to so many kids -- imagine the people in the paintings *actually live* in those paintings, and can communicate to those viewing the painting. As an almost art history major, I loved that these were real paintings, that this was set at a real museum, and the richness of the art world developed in this story. But I still haven't even gotten to wh What an incredible book! I was already a fan of this author from her previous book, but this one blew me out of the water. The concept alone will sell it to so many kids -- imagine the people in the paintings *actually live* in those paintings, and can communicate to those viewing the painting. As an almost art history major, I loved that these were real paintings, that this was set at a real museum, and the richness of the art world developed in this story. But I still haven't even gotten to what I really loved, which was the relationship between Mona, the girl in the painting, and Sargent Singer, the boy in the real world. Their friendship that spans time and mediums is so powerful. It's one that will stick with me for a while.

  18. 4 out of 5

    MaykenAlanna

    I simply LOVED this book. Sargent, the visiting son of the art gallery director discovers the paintings in the gallery are alive. Reminds you of Harry Potter? Me too. But here, it is a secret. When Sargent makes friends with Mona, a girl in one of the paintings, he has to keep it from his father. And there are more secrets surrounding the gallery, its director, and certain paintings. Several paintings are removed for restoration, but is that really all that is being done? And what will happen to I simply LOVED this book. Sargent, the visiting son of the art gallery director discovers the paintings in the gallery are alive. Reminds you of Harry Potter? Me too. But here, it is a secret. When Sargent makes friends with Mona, a girl in one of the paintings, he has to keep it from his father. And there are more secrets surrounding the gallery, its director, and certain paintings. Several paintings are removed for restoration, but is that really all that is being done? And what will happen to Sargent and Mona when he has to leave again? You will never look at paintings the same way again. And especially not at those featured in the story. (The book includes reproductions of those.)

  19. 5 out of 5

    Jonathan Rosen

    I loved The Frame - Up! I love settings like this one, in an art gallery. What made this one even more fun, was that it's a real place. When I was a kid and read things like that, it spurred my imagination anytime I visited the places written about, and I;m sure kids now will do the same. Mona and Sargent were great characters. Charming, This was just such a fun book, with the paintings coming to life. I can't wait to visit the Beaverbrook Art Gallery for real now. I think this book will be love I loved The Frame - Up! I love settings like this one, in an art gallery. What made this one even more fun, was that it's a real place. When I was a kid and read things like that, it spurred my imagination anytime I visited the places written about, and I;m sure kids now will do the same. Mona and Sargent were great characters. Charming, This was just such a fun book, with the paintings coming to life. I can't wait to visit the Beaverbrook Art Gallery for real now. I think this book will be loved by kids for many years to come, since it really does have a timeless feel. I look forward to more from this author. 

  20. 5 out of 5

    Patricia

    One of my favorite reads this year. Wendy McLeod MacKnight blends humor, mystery, heart, and art in this fun and intriguing middle grade novel. Great characters abound - both inside and outside of the paintings. And MacKnight keeps the mystery tight and the plot moving while mixing in just the right amount of relationship/family problems. Clever. Innovative. Great writing. And a fun read. This one is timeless.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Dana Middleton

    I loved this book! And I don't want to tell you why. Because this inventive, exciting and fascinating novel needs to be experienced, so no spoilers here. I've been waiting for Wendy McLeod MacKnight's The Frame Up to come out for months and as soon as I got my copy, I couldn't put it down. Wendy paints such an amazing world here and her characters are like none I've read before. Delightfully imaginative and what a satisfying ending. Read this book!

  22. 5 out of 5

    Alyssa

    I truly enjoyed The Frame-Up. It was a fun book set in a world that reminded me a bit of Night of the Museum in that the people in the paintings are alive. The Frame-Up is well-plotted and full of wonderful characters who endear themselves to the reader. The mystery keeps the pages turning and the reader wondering what will happen next.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Rena

    4.75 stars rounded up to 5. Such an imaginative and creative book set in a Canadian Art Gallery. Beautiful pictures of the “main character” paintings were also included. Suspenseful, fantastical, and emotional. A positive portrayal of both the male and female lead characters (Sargent and Mona). A highly recommended read.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Allison

    Fans of the Inkworld series will delight in The Frame-Up by Wendy McLeod MacKnight. This creative and original story takes readers inside the frames of the artwork at the Beaverbrook Art Gallery. I loved learning about the lives of the paintings and solving the mystery at the gallery! Such a great read!

  25. 4 out of 5

    Dee

    THE FRAME-UP was clever and fun with lots great characters (both inside and outside the paintings!). The author does a great job of creating and defining the worlds the characters live in, and we as the readers get to watch those worlds meet. I also loved all the extra tidbits and photographs so we can learn about the real art gallery where the story takes place. :)

  26. 5 out of 5

    Michelle

    A great novel that not only engaged myself but my 14 year old son and 5 year old nephew. It was great that the book referenced popular movies where the art came alive; that will certainly help with comprehension for struggling readers.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Andrea

    I enjoyed the premise of this, paintings that are alive. The story switches back and forth between Sargent, an art gallery director's son, and Mona, a character in a painting at the art gallery. A good mystery that isn't too predictable. Good character development and an enjoyable story.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Wendy Wheaton

    It is fabulous love it. Read it twice.❤❤ It is fabulous love it. Read it twice.❤️❤️

  29. 4 out of 5

    Joan

    Terrific

  30. 4 out of 5

    Laura Mossa

    Review forthcoming

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