kode adsense disini
Hot Best Seller

Blood & Ivy: The 1849 Murder That Scandalized Harvard

Availability: Ready to download

A delectable true-crime story of scandal and murder at America’s most celebrated university. On November 23rd of 1849, in the heart of Boston, one of the city’s richest men simply vanished. Dr. George Parkman, a Brahmin who owned much of Boston’s West End, was last seen that afternoon visiting his alma mater, Harvard Medical School. Police scoured city tenements and the har A delectable true-crime story of scandal and murder at America’s most celebrated university. On November 23rd of 1849, in the heart of Boston, one of the city’s richest men simply vanished. Dr. George Parkman, a Brahmin who owned much of Boston’s West End, was last seen that afternoon visiting his alma mater, Harvard Medical School. Police scoured city tenements and the harbor, and offered hefty rewards as leads put the elusive Dr. Parkman at sea or hiding in Manhattan. But one Harvard janitor held a much darker suspicion: that their ruthless benefactor had never left the Medical School building alive. His shocking discoveries in a chemistry professor’s laboratory engulfed America in one of its most infamous trials: The Commonwealth of Massachusetts v. John White Webster. A baffling case of red herrings, grave robbery, and dismemberment—of Harvard’s greatest doctors investigating one of their own, for a murder hidden in a building full of cadavers—it became a landmark case in the use of medical forensics and the meaning of reasonable doubt. Paul Collins brings nineteenth-century Boston back to life in vivid detail, weaving together newspaper accounts, letters, journals, court transcripts, and memoirs from this groundbreaking case. Rich in characters and evocative in atmosphere, Blood & Ivy explores the fatal entanglement of new science and old money in one of America’s greatest murder mysteries.


Compare
kode adsense disini

A delectable true-crime story of scandal and murder at America’s most celebrated university. On November 23rd of 1849, in the heart of Boston, one of the city’s richest men simply vanished. Dr. George Parkman, a Brahmin who owned much of Boston’s West End, was last seen that afternoon visiting his alma mater, Harvard Medical School. Police scoured city tenements and the har A delectable true-crime story of scandal and murder at America’s most celebrated university. On November 23rd of 1849, in the heart of Boston, one of the city’s richest men simply vanished. Dr. George Parkman, a Brahmin who owned much of Boston’s West End, was last seen that afternoon visiting his alma mater, Harvard Medical School. Police scoured city tenements and the harbor, and offered hefty rewards as leads put the elusive Dr. Parkman at sea or hiding in Manhattan. But one Harvard janitor held a much darker suspicion: that their ruthless benefactor had never left the Medical School building alive. His shocking discoveries in a chemistry professor’s laboratory engulfed America in one of its most infamous trials: The Commonwealth of Massachusetts v. John White Webster. A baffling case of red herrings, grave robbery, and dismemberment—of Harvard’s greatest doctors investigating one of their own, for a murder hidden in a building full of cadavers—it became a landmark case in the use of medical forensics and the meaning of reasonable doubt. Paul Collins brings nineteenth-century Boston back to life in vivid detail, weaving together newspaper accounts, letters, journals, court transcripts, and memoirs from this groundbreaking case. Rich in characters and evocative in atmosphere, Blood & Ivy explores the fatal entanglement of new science and old money in one of America’s greatest murder mysteries.

30 review for Blood & Ivy: The 1849 Murder That Scandalized Harvard

  1. 5 out of 5

    BAM The Bibliomaniac

    Goodreads giveaway win You had me at murder committed in 1849, Goodreads. Dr. George Parkman disappeared after missing an appointment in the area of Harvard University. No one knew with whom the appointment was, not where he could have gone after leaving a head of lettuce on hold at a local store. A reward was offered and Harvard was searched. When the body was finally found and a suspect named the town was rocked to its core. Money of course was the motive. Parkman has much; the suspect bizarrel Goodreads giveaway win You had me at murder committed in 1849, Goodreads. Dr. George Parkman disappeared after missing an appointment in the area of Harvard University. No one knew with whom the appointment was, not where he could have gone after leaving a head of lettuce on hold at a local store. A reward was offered and Harvard was searched. When the body was finally found and a suspect named the town was rocked to its core. Money of course was the motive. Parkman has much; the suspect bizarrely had none. Dental evidence was introduced to identify the victim, which had never been used in an American capital case. The verdict was unanimous. I found this case fascinating. Coming right off the scandal of buying bodies a little too fresh for dissection at the medical college, Harvard was once again making headlines it could not afford. It always amazes me that people think they can get away with murder. Shake my head.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Emily

    True crime is not my usual genre, in fact, I think Devil in the White City is the only other true crime book I’ve read. For fans of that book, I recommend you give Collins a try. Blood and Ivy has that interesting narrative style of a lot of modern history books like Devil in the White City. Collins has an extensive list of references—over 60 pages of notes and sources at the end of the book—and judging by his acknowledgments, it took him a lot of time to pull it all together into something read True crime is not my usual genre, in fact, I think Devil in the White City is the only other true crime book I’ve read. For fans of that book, I recommend you give Collins a try. Blood and Ivy has that interesting narrative style of a lot of modern history books like Devil in the White City. Collins has an extensive list of references—over 60 pages of notes and sources at the end of the book—and judging by his acknowledgments, it took him a lot of time to pull it all together into something readable. Besides the grisly details and unraveling of the murder, the history of Boston, Cambridge, and specifically Harvard around 1849 was interesting to me. I was surprised by how many famous authors were connected to this case, either because they were faculty at Harvard, they knew Webster, or simply because they were alive during the trial and its aftermath. The Epilogue notes that the case was inspiration for Dickens’s The Mystery of Edwin Drood, which I didn’t know. The legal precedents that came out of this case were fascinating too, particularly what became known as the “Webster charge,” based on the judge’s definition of reasonable doubt for the jury. It endured over 100 years after the trial, and Massachusetts didn’t decide to modernize it until 2015. The history is by turns sad, perplexing, and disturbing. Collins did a nice job incorporating historical detail into his linear narrative of the investigation and trial. It was truly worth the read, and I’m interested in checking out his other work.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Cindy H.

    Thank you to NetGalley and WW Norton Publishing for gifting me with an ARC of Blood & Ivy by Paul Collins. In exchange I offer my unbiased review. I absolutely loved this true crime account. Collins skillfully and artistically draws the reader into the mid 19th century and the exclusive halls of Harvard University. In 1849 Dr. George Parkman, a Harvard graduate and benefactor of the esteemed university left his home to run some errands and never returned. Foul play was quickly suspected and Thank you to NetGalley and WW Norton Publishing for gifting me with an ARC of Blood & Ivy by Paul Collins. In exchange I offer my unbiased review. I absolutely loved this true crime account. Collins skillfully and artistically draws the reader into the mid 19th century and the exclusive halls of Harvard University. In 1849 Dr. George Parkman, a Harvard graduate and benefactor of the esteemed university left his home to run some errands and never returned. Foul play was quickly suspected and within a week the culprit arrested. The book goes about describing the victim, the accused, the trial and the aftermath. I was riveted from page one and completely mesmerized by the startling conclusion. Paul Collins extensive research was evident as this nonfiction account read like fiction with all the astonishing details, newspaper headlines, letters and journals.Appearances from Harvard alumni, Dr. Oliver Wendell Holmes and poet Henry Wadsworth Longfellow really added to the drama and mystery. Evocative and exhilarating this is a must read for all true crime fans and history buffs!

  4. 5 out of 5

    KC

    Blood & Ivy is about the case of a missing doctor after visiting his alma mater, Harvard Medical School, a scandal that the school would love to avoid at all costs. This is a slow story that reminds me of The Devil in the White City but not as detailed or riveting. Sadly, I was not impressed.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Thebooktrail

    A real life crime of the century brought to grisly exquisite life! Take your reading scalpel to this one and get dissecting!

  6. 4 out of 5

    Graeme Roberts

    An elegant, beautifully structured tale from real life. Fascinating characters, just the right amount of detail, and a crystal-clear evocation of life in the Boston of 1849. I could smell it. Paul Collins is a modern master.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Kari

    For the most part I enjoyed this one. It was kind of cool to read about Cambridge and Boston in the late 1840s. The author did a great job of setting the tone for the true crime story about the murder of a prominent Harvard professor. It was the first case in the US to use dental evidence as well as making a case for reasonable doubt. Worth a read, however it is a little slow.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Paul

    Blood & Ivy is another smart true crime book from Paul Collins. A slew of new types of evidence for the time and this great subject matter (a case that inspired Dickens!) will engage his existing fans and should bring a legion of new readers. Many thanks to NetGalley, W. W. Norton & Company, and Mr. Collins for the advanced copy for review. Full review can be found here: https://paulspicks.blog/2018/03/17/bl... Please check out all my reviews: https://paulspicks.blog

  9. 5 out of 5

    Joyce

    Another fascinating historical true crime account, this one set at Harvard's august medical school in 1849. School benefactor and graduate George Parkman, who made his fortune in real estate, goes missing in November 1849, last seen visiting a colleague in the medical school. (Others, like me, may more easily recognize his literary brother, Francis Parkman, of Oregon Trail fame). Police and everyone are out looking, as Parkman is socially connected. The investigation ends up back at the medical Another fascinating historical true crime account, this one set at Harvard's august medical school in 1849. School benefactor and graduate George Parkman, who made his fortune in real estate, goes missing in November 1849, last seen visiting a colleague in the medical school. (Others, like me, may more easily recognize his literary brother, Francis Parkman, of Oregon Trail fame). Police and everyone are out looking, as Parkman is socially connected. The investigation ends up back at the medical school with the colleague he visited there, chemistry professor John White Webster, charged. In the ensuing trial, dental records were used for identification for the first time (Webster destroyed the body in ways villains in mystery novels have imitated since--equally unsuccessfully) and the nature of "reasonable doubt" was also established. Collins is a good storyteller--there are lots of historical, medical, social details--but this reads like a good novel. Webster was seriously in debt, to Parkman and others, in part because of the tiny salaries Harvard paid. Collins portrays a fascinating cast from the dour Parkman to Littlefield, the school janitor who discovered the murder technique and murderer, and Webster. For fans of true crime and gritty historical novels.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Nicole

    An interesting read about the murder of a Harvard professor back in 1849, whose dismembered body was found within the medical college. The case was scandalous at the time for another Harvard professor was ultimately charged with the crime. The book is a whose who of famous individuals of government, literature and education, particularly for this time in Massachusetts, for many were either friends of the victim or the accused, or were involved in the court case in some fashion. Author Collins di An interesting read about the murder of a Harvard professor back in 1849, whose dismembered body was found within the medical college. The case was scandalous at the time for another Harvard professor was ultimately charged with the crime. The book is a whose who of famous individuals of government, literature and education, particularly for this time in Massachusetts, for many were either friends of the victim or the accused, or were involved in the court case in some fashion. Author Collins did a wonderful job integrating these personalities within the main plot and there is a great narrative voice throughout the novel which does give it a feel of something written in an bygone era. There are legal precedents which were established by this case, including the judge's description of what constituted "reasonable doubt" which was utilized for decades afterwards and the utilization of what would today be described as both forensic dentistry and forensic anatomy. Overall well researched novel that speaks of darker past within the hallowed walls of Harvard which captured the minds of Bostonians at the time.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Steve

    A very interesting book. In 1849 Boston, a wealthy doctor by the name of George Parkman was last seen at Harvard Medical School. What makes this interesting, Is it became the first case where medical forensics was involved and the meaning of reasonable doubt. A great edge on your seat page-turner!!!!

  12. 5 out of 5

    Ronnie Cramer

    Another exceptional historical true crime book from the author of MURDER OF THE CENTURY. The research is excellent, and here's an example of the writing quality: "Webster's writ was really something of a scarecrow made of lots of little straws bound together to appear frightful, on closer inspection, it was still merely...straw."

  13. 4 out of 5

    Rachel Pollock

    This is another gripping historical true-crime book by Collins, set at Harvard in the time of Oliver Wendell Holmes. The crime chronicled purportedly inspired Charles Dickens to write The Mystery of Edwin Drood. Sinister, creepy, and sometimes kinda gross. I enjoyed it!

  14. 5 out of 5

    Paulcbry

    The book starts out focusing on cadavers but soon turns into a first rate murder mystery. The trial subsequent to the crime offers up the first clarification of the term 'reasonable doubt'. This is a terrific read from a terrific author. I look forward to more writings from him.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Mary

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Distinguished, rich, and important Dr. Parkman disappears. Despite numerous handbills offering rewards and law enforcement searches, he can’t be found. During the early 1850’s when Harvard Medical School was was beginning to produce fine doctors, the doctor who donated the land for the medical school was missing. However, a janitor at the medical school began to suspect that one of the professors there may have caused Parkman’s death. Collins’ book details the primary parties, the investigation, Distinguished, rich, and important Dr. Parkman disappears. Despite numerous handbills offering rewards and law enforcement searches, he can’t be found. During the early 1850’s when Harvard Medical School was was beginning to produce fine doctors, the doctor who donated the land for the medical school was missing. However, a janitor at the medical school began to suspect that one of the professors there may have caused Parkman’s death. Collins’ book details the primary parties, the investigation, and trial. His book is well documented and authoritatively sourced. Reading about the trial and the prosecution’s use of forensic evidence and the motive behind the murder makes for fascinating reading.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Eugenea Pollock

    Paul Collins, who never disappoints, follows the historical footprints of a killer who considered himself too smart to be caught—after all, he WAS a Harvard professor. However, his attempts to cover it up were the “dead giveaway”. Also, the grisliest part.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Amanda

    Paul Collins sets you squarely in the insular 1840s Harvard, and pages fly by as you're drawn in to the story of how a murder rocked this staid society. I picked up this book having some familiarity with the case, but the whole thing turned out to be so much more than I knew! Recommended for true crime, Harvard/Boston history, or legal history enthusiasts. I received a digital ARC from the publisher via Netgalley.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Scott Smith

    It took me a little while to get fully immersed in this book. Collins’ writing style seemed clunky at first, but I think I just needed to adjust because after the first few chapters I was captivated by the story. I don’t have much firsthand knowledge of Harvard or Boston, I imagine that would make this story that much more entertaining. Collins’ impressively brought to life characters and a story that is over 150 years old.

  19. 5 out of 5

    nikkia neil

    Thanks W. W. Norton & Company for this ARC. All opinions are my own. This biography has so many echos into the present. You'll be outraged, engaged, and glued to your seat. Collins is a master at his craft.

  20. 5 out of 5

    David Schwinghammer

    BLOOD AND IVY is about a famous murder trial occurring in 1849. What's unusual about it is that a Harvard professor is accused of murdering a famous doctor and real estate landlord. The case was also unique in that there were no eye witnesses but the victim's false teeth were found in a small furnace in the accused's lab. The dentist who made his false teeth took the stand and identified the teeth as those he made for the victim. A handwriting expert also testified that one of the letters sent to BLOOD AND IVY is about a famous murder trial occurring in 1849. What's unusual about it is that a Harvard professor is accused of murdering a famous doctor and real estate landlord. The case was also unique in that there were no eye witnesses but the victim's false teeth were found in a small furnace in the accused's lab. The dentist who made his false teeth took the stand and identified the teeth as those he made for the victim. A handwriting expert also testified that one of the letters sent to the police and newspapers was written by Dr. Webster, the accused. We also learn that no distinction was made between premeditated murder and second degree murder in those days. If guilty the accused would hang either way One of the most valuable witnesses was the medical school janitor who noticed the lab door was locked in the morning when he was accustomed to firing up Dr. Webster's furnace, since he constantly complained about being cold. He also noticed the wall of the lab was hot to the touch, which meant the furnace was being stoked almost beyond capacity. The janitor also found what remained of the body. The defense, used the now much used charge of accusing the janitor of the nefarious deed. He took the fifth when he was asked if he used the lab to gamble occasionally. The newspapers of the day were basically tabloids and every wild scheme and accusation was duly published as were some of the letters sent in by obvious scammers, but as noted above, one of them was apparently sent by Dr. Webster. I got the impression from the synopsis that the wrong man had been accused. I waited for a last minute reprieve and a last minute witness clearing the doctor. Otherwise this was a rather predictable true crime endeavor. But the authorities did make exceptions for the doctor since he had been at Harvard for many years and had never shown any sign of this type of malevolence, although he did have a bad temper.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Remy Tate

    A Fascinating Look at a Famous Case I'm going to preface this review by saying that I did receive this book for free in a giveaway. This book was, on the whole, deeply impressive. The more informal style the book is written, in addition to the suspenseful pacing, kept what could have been a very dry read entertaining. The inclusion of several well-known authors of the time, Dickens being the one not directly connected to the case mentioned most often, also provide cultural touchstones and drive ho A Fascinating Look at a Famous Case I'm going to preface this review by saying that I did receive this book for free in a giveaway. This book was, on the whole, deeply impressive. The more informal style the book is written, in addition to the suspenseful pacing, kept what could have been a very dry read entertaining. The inclusion of several well-known authors of the time, Dickens being the one not directly connected to the case mentioned most often, also provide cultural touchstones and drive home the enormity of this case to the average reader. The empathetic and impartial eye taken to the people most closely involved in the case gave a fuller sense of who they were as people, to the point where (as someone who had not known this case prior to reading) even I was torn on the accused's guilt until nearer the end of the trial. The pacing also played into this, as the book takes the case step-by-step from Harvard life in the 1850s to the day of the murder to the investigation and trial and beyond. This allows the reader to have both a more nuanced view of the case details and also to have time to second guess their initial ideas about them. My one complaint is that I did find the opening section to be slightly too long, since I was expecting there to be more details on the actual crime earlier than they actually appear; however, later on I very much appreciated having the context provided in the first several parts, as having that sense of personality for all the key players in the trial definitely made me more invested in the proceedings. As someone who loves true crime, I would highly recommend this book to anyone interested in historical crime.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Sue

    Excellent true crime book! Paul Collins has a great narrative style that keeps the story moving. The 1849 murder of a doctor and real estate mogul, as well as the eventual trial, was a sensation in Boston at the time and well worth a retelling of the story. Collins weaves historical information about Harvard, including a scandal involving the stealing of cadavers, skillfully to give us a real feel of the atmosphere surrounding the disappearance and murder of Dr. Parkman. I was especially surpris Excellent true crime book! Paul Collins has a great narrative style that keeps the story moving. The 1849 murder of a doctor and real estate mogul, as well as the eventual trial, was a sensation in Boston at the time and well worth a retelling of the story. Collins weaves historical information about Harvard, including a scandal involving the stealing of cadavers, skillfully to give us a real feel of the atmosphere surrounding the disappearance and murder of Dr. Parkman. I was especially surprised to learn that this was the first case in the United States to use forensic science to prove someone's guilt in court. The presiding judge also gave a well-reasoned and famous explanation of reasonable doubt which remained in use for over 100 years. Besides the excellent writing and relevant historical information I was surprised at the number of famous persons involved in or interested in the case. Oliver Wendell Holmes and Charles Dickens are only two of them. Dickens was so enthralled with the case that his last novel, "The Mystery of Edwin Drood" was based on this case. I would highly recommend this book for lovers of true crime, those who like historical crimes and those who like their non-fiction books written in a easy to read narrative fashion. Disclaimer: I won this book through Goodreads.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Steve

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Disclaimer: I received this book from GoodReads' First Reads program. Blood & Ivy is the story of a horrible murder that happened in mid-19th century Cambridge, Massachusetts. Dr. Parkman was making his rounds, collecting payments on debts owed him when he disappeared. A massive search and posted rewards turns up a whole lot of nothing. A janitor who works for one of the professors at Harvard notices something is wrong - one of the walls in the professor's lab is exceptionally hot. Worrying t Disclaimer: I received this book from GoodReads' First Reads program. Blood & Ivy is the story of a horrible murder that happened in mid-19th century Cambridge, Massachusetts. Dr. Parkman was making his rounds, collecting payments on debts owed him when he disappeared. A massive search and posted rewards turns up a whole lot of nothing. A janitor who works for one of the professors at Harvard notices something is wrong - one of the walls in the professor's lab is exceptionally hot. Worrying that a fire is in the next room, he investigates further. He finds nothing at first, but becomes suspicious, and while the professor is away, he breaks into the one area that hadn't been search - the privy. He manages to break through the wall into the privy and finds human remains. The police are notified, finding a torso and leg, and teeth and bones in the furnace. This leads to the arrest and eventual conviction of the janitor's employer, Dr. Webster. The trial becomes a huge sensation, with the professor claiming his innocence the whole time, and trying to pin the murder on the janitor. The jury doesn't buy it, and he is convicted and sentenced to death. In the end, he confesses to his crime and meets his maker. A very interesting true crime story, which I highly recommend to fans of the genre.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Rosa Tremaine

    In Blood & Ivy: The 1849 Murder that Scandalized Harvard, Paul Collins weaves a complex true crime tale that twists around itself rather like the hangman's noose that casts a long and deadly shadow over the plot. The book begins and ends with Charles Dickens, a device that is both clever and relevant to the context. I had always assumed Dickens to be exaggerating his characters into caricatures of themselves, but the real-life people in Blood & Ivy are every bit as eccentric and bizarre In Blood & Ivy: The 1849 Murder that Scandalized Harvard, Paul Collins weaves a complex true crime tale that twists around itself rather like the hangman's noose that casts a long and deadly shadow over the plot. The book begins and ends with Charles Dickens, a device that is both clever and relevant to the context. I had always assumed Dickens to be exaggerating his characters into caricatures of themselves, but the real-life people in Blood & Ivy are every bit as eccentric and bizarre as any fictional creation, and under Collins' expert hands they spring to vivid life and march boldly off the page. It is a masterpiece of storytelling but also of historical investigation. The extensive notes in the back of the book are a testament to the author's dedication to accuracy and detail, yet it never reads as a dry recitation of history. A distinctly Victorian flavour of gruesome fascination pervades the story, but is tempered by a frank modern appreciation of fact as well as how the case of Professor Webster was a legal trailblazer for subsequent trials. If the conclusion of the case is somewhat unsatisfying, Paul Collins cannot be held to blame for the unanswered questions left hanging in the air - real life does not always provide a tidy and complete explanation for its mysteries.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Amy

    This was more interesting than I expected. The murder itself wasn't the most interesting part. It was reading the realities of life at that time, through the lens of a missing person and murder trial. Apparently, there was a lot more civil disobedience, unrest and rioting in the streets than I was aware of. The author makes it clear that these things were a regular part of life in the city. Sometimes, there weren't even reasons for the rioting behavior. Just something to go wild about. I wonder i This was more interesting than I expected. The murder itself wasn't the most interesting part. It was reading the realities of life at that time, through the lens of a missing person and murder trial. Apparently, there was a lot more civil disobedience, unrest and rioting in the streets than I was aware of. The author makes it clear that these things were a regular part of life in the city. Sometimes, there weren't even reasons for the rioting behavior. Just something to go wild about. I wonder if that was part of the "overflow" of the civility and pressure of living in such an urban area instead of the more rural areas that people used to live in. I think I am mixing history books here with this though, but it is what occurred to me as I was reading this book. I also found that there were a shocking amount of parallels with our modern times. The newspaper advertisements using the sensationalization of the trial to sell product. The newspapers reporting rumor and speculation when they had no clear facts of the case. People hanging on every bit of information related to the popular case. These are all still things that happen today, some of which I attributed to modern civilization. Apparently, these behaviors have been around much longer than that.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Tyler

    Historical true-crime is one of favorites and this one delivered on everything I like about it. It has to have a good setting and go to various tangents to build the world for me but not too many so as to lose the thread. Really, good historical true-crime will have a overall story that carries the story with all the tangents to keep you entertained. No doubt this one has all that going for it. Collins seems to be a fan of the factoid and the book is peppered with them. Sometimes they are writte Historical true-crime is one of favorites and this one delivered on everything I like about it. It has to have a good setting and go to various tangents to build the world for me but not too many so as to lose the thread. Really, good historical true-crime will have a overall story that carries the story with all the tangents to keep you entertained. No doubt this one has all that going for it. Collins seems to be a fan of the factoid and the book is peppered with them. Sometimes they are written in so off-hand it seems like it was an accident. Collins's style is bit odd. It is hard to get into the flow of his books at first. Hard to explain why but they are so conversational. Like you are listening to a passerby tell the story to some friend. It doesn't have the feel of a academic work, and everything has a semi-droll or sarcastic tone. This style hurt his earlier book "Murder of the Century" for me to figure out what was supposed to be taken seriously. He also does go too far in depth on anything. It leaves you wanting more at times but it also keeps the book brisk. That tone is here but it wasn't much of an issue this time. The Harvard setting, characters and story kept it interesting.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Steve

    The story of the 1849 murder of a Harvard medical professor who was then found dismembered in the private privy and laboratory of one Dr. John W. Webster. Webster was deeply in debt and Parkman, the victim, was one of his creditors and was aggressive in asking for remittance. Webster was convicted and executed in 1850 Boston making him the second Harvard alumni to be executed. The first was George Burroughs who was executed for witchcraft in 1692. The charge given the jury as to what resembled r The story of the 1849 murder of a Harvard medical professor who was then found dismembered in the private privy and laboratory of one Dr. John W. Webster. Webster was deeply in debt and Parkman, the victim, was one of his creditors and was aggressive in asking for remittance. Webster was convicted and executed in 1850 Boston making him the second Harvard alumni to be executed. The first was George Burroughs who was executed for witchcraft in 1692. The charge given the jury as to what resembled reasonable doubt under the direction of Chief Justice Shaw of the Mass. Supreme Court remained in use until 2015 in Mass. and was the "Webster Charge." Justice Anthony Kennedy wrote about its effectiveness in a 1994 US Supreme Court decision. The text also mentions the fact Pietro Bartolo (Bachi) was let go as a language professor at Harvard was let go for getting into debt. In reality, Harvard didn't want to admit that his salary wasn't enough to maintain his small family even though he also wrote several successful textbooks.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Mary Rose

    "The skeptic might have pointed out that Shaw, as a member of Harvard's board of overseers, had a conflict of interest in this case, but that was not how the law worked in Boston, and particularly, not how the law worked at Harvard." This isn't an analytical academic history, but it is a wonderfully constructed narrative history that gripped me from the get-go. Collins has done a wonderful job piecing together the story of the Parkman-Webster murder case from court records, newspaper clippings, d "The skeptic might have pointed out that Shaw, as a member of Harvard's board of overseers, had a conflict of interest in this case, but that was not how the law worked in Boston, and particularly, not how the law worked at Harvard." This isn't an analytical academic history, but it is a wonderfully constructed narrative history that gripped me from the get-go. Collins has done a wonderful job piecing together the story of the Parkman-Webster murder case from court records, newspaper clippings, diary entries, all very seamlessly. I had a hard time putting it down, every page was equal parts fascinating and consternating and demonstrates the complete omnipresence of "Harvard Men" in Cambridge and Boston at the time. I wish it had gone a bit further in teasing out some of the implications of the trial, what it does is very brief, but overall I had a great time and I'm going to be reading more of Collins' work in the future.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Jan

    Funny thing is, I picked up this book while browsing at the library, completely unaware that I'd already read two books by this author (I'm not great at taking note of authors I enjoy). Obviously, I like the cut of this guy's jib. My favorite thing about Collins is his ability to bring history to life. I feel that we have such a stilted view of history. We tend to think that our ancestors were somehow "other" compared to those of us in modern times. Collins describes the cities & time periods Funny thing is, I picked up this book while browsing at the library, completely unaware that I'd already read two books by this author (I'm not great at taking note of authors I enjoy). Obviously, I like the cut of this guy's jib. My favorite thing about Collins is his ability to bring history to life. I feel that we have such a stilted view of history. We tend to think that our ancestors were somehow "other" compared to those of us in modern times. Collins describes the cities & time periods he writes about in such a way that you become completely engaged. You can see yourself living in that time period. I didn't feel as connected to this book as others I've read of his, although I did find it engaging and he kept me guessing at the alleged perpetrator's guilt right until the very end. Somehow it didn't quite click. I liked it but I didn't love it.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Layne

    For me this was a solid 3.5 read, so the half star goes to the author. Full disclosure, I received a free ecopy of this book from the publisher but am not required to write a review. The story was compelling and the author did a good job of moving it along. He let the dramatic nature of the events speak for themselves and did not overly embellish the narrative. I have one small quibble with the ebook version. The footnotes are highlighted and linked to the bibliography, which is fine. However th For me this was a solid 3.5 read, so the half star goes to the author. Full disclosure, I received a free ecopy of this book from the publisher but am not required to write a review. The story was compelling and the author did a good job of moving it along. He let the dramatic nature of the events speak for themselves and did not overly embellish the narrative. I have one small quibble with the ebook version. The footnotes are highlighted and linked to the bibliography, which is fine. However the sheer number of them makes for distracting reading. I did not allow this to affect my rating as I am certain the format of the ebook footnotes is not under the author’s control. I mention this more to allow readers to know so they can make a more informed decision about what format they choose to read this in.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.