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The Terrible: A Storyteller's Memoir

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From the poet behind bone, a lyrical memoir—part prose, part verse—about coming-of-age, uncovering the cruelty and the beauty of the wider world, and redemption through self-discovery and the bonds of family “My little brother and I saw a unicorn in the garden in the late nineties. I’m telling you. Neither one of us made it up; it was as real as anything else.” The Terrible, From the poet behind bone, a lyrical memoir—part prose, part verse—about coming-of-age, uncovering the cruelty and the beauty of the wider world, and redemption through self-discovery and the bonds of family “My little brother and I saw a unicorn in the garden in the late nineties. I’m telling you. Neither one of us made it up; it was as real as anything else.” The Terrible, Yrsa Daley-Ward’s brave, raw, lyrical memoir that captures the surreal magic and incredible discomfort of adolescence, burgeoning sexuality, rootlessness, and connection. Through emotional snapshots that span from her adolescence through her early twenties, each brought to life in Yrsa’s signature style of open white spaces and stirring, singular lines, The Terrible evokes the pain and thrill of girlhood, as well as what it means to discover the fear and power that come with being a woman. With a sharp eye and a rare talent for mining the beauty and the sorrow in the everyday, Yrsa recounts her remarkable life: growing up as one of the only black children in a poor, white, working class town; navigating the extreme Christianity of her family; inquiring after her paternity; moving through phases of addiction and sexual encounters; and ultimately finding her place in her family and in life.


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From the poet behind bone, a lyrical memoir—part prose, part verse—about coming-of-age, uncovering the cruelty and the beauty of the wider world, and redemption through self-discovery and the bonds of family “My little brother and I saw a unicorn in the garden in the late nineties. I’m telling you. Neither one of us made it up; it was as real as anything else.” The Terrible, From the poet behind bone, a lyrical memoir—part prose, part verse—about coming-of-age, uncovering the cruelty and the beauty of the wider world, and redemption through self-discovery and the bonds of family “My little brother and I saw a unicorn in the garden in the late nineties. I’m telling you. Neither one of us made it up; it was as real as anything else.” The Terrible, Yrsa Daley-Ward’s brave, raw, lyrical memoir that captures the surreal magic and incredible discomfort of adolescence, burgeoning sexuality, rootlessness, and connection. Through emotional snapshots that span from her adolescence through her early twenties, each brought to life in Yrsa’s signature style of open white spaces and stirring, singular lines, The Terrible evokes the pain and thrill of girlhood, as well as what it means to discover the fear and power that come with being a woman. With a sharp eye and a rare talent for mining the beauty and the sorrow in the everyday, Yrsa recounts her remarkable life: growing up as one of the only black children in a poor, white, working class town; navigating the extreme Christianity of her family; inquiring after her paternity; moving through phases of addiction and sexual encounters; and ultimately finding her place in her family and in life.

30 review for The Terrible: A Storyteller's Memoir

  1. 5 out of 5

    Warda

    “Pull yourself together. You are an African, the most magical kind of human there is.” I knew that this book would break my heart and it did. It’s a memoir of Yrsa dealing with life’s challenges (understatement) and it is raw, brutal and honest. There are four parts to this book, each section exploring a different stage in the authors life, the tone of the book and the language changing with it and echoing its time frame. Thought it is poetry, the writing does an incredible job of weaving those p “Pull yourself together. You are an African, the most magical kind of human there is.” I knew that this book would break my heart and it did. It’s a memoir of Yrsa dealing with life’s challenges (understatement) and it is raw, brutal and honest. There are four parts to this book, each section exploring a different stage in the authors life, the tone of the book and the language changing with it and echoing its time frame. Thought it is poetry, the writing does an incredible job of weaving those parts together and through it, a whole and vivid story is captured. It was extremely heavy to read at times, as the truth of it weighs you down. As I was reading it, I was processing a whole range of emotions. What stood out to me the most — and this’ll have to do with me projecting out my own personal fear of having and raising children if that ever happens — is how difficult raising and nurturing one is, especially when you had to move countries. Serious props to those parents! There’s no way you could blame the mother for the unintentional neglect of her children. Or maybe it was intentional, but it was never the goal. The mother herself was dealing with her own set of problems, which unfortunately did have a knock-on effect in the neglect of her children and you can feel those words vibrating off the pages as Yrsa describes her desperate need for her mother to be there, to be loved. Thus, this led to her looking for ways to fill that void. Themes such as immigration, parenthood (particularly single parenthood), race, drug abuse and depression are spoken of in real and colourful way. There’s a chapter that depicts depression in its most ugliest form and I’d probably recommend it for those pages alone. It is ridiculously powerful and god, it hurt to read. I feel like I was wounded in the process of reading this book. I know it’ll linger for a while. It’s one of those stories that will have you looking at life from an angle you haven’t been exposed to before and if this isn’t what books should be doing, I don’t know what it. Thank you Penguin UK for sending me a copy.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Roman Clodia

    I didn't find this as fresh or original as I hoped: Daley-Ward creates a dark memoir of alienation, depression and a downward spiral of drink, drugs and sex, occasionally lit by flares of imagination and sparse moments of love and connection. But I found this over-written in places, and the free-verse form gimmicky with random line breaks and occasional right-margin justification which have no effect on meaning or interpretation. There's so much white space on each page that this is a speedy read I didn't find this as fresh or original as I hoped: Daley-Ward creates a dark memoir of alienation, depression and a downward spiral of drink, drugs and sex, occasionally lit by flares of imagination and sparse moments of love and connection. But I found this over-written in places, and the free-verse form gimmicky with random line breaks and occasional right-margin justification which have no effect on meaning or interpretation. There's so much white space on each page that this is a speedy read, non-judgmental and open, and I can imagine it being therapeutic to write. I just seem to have read many similar stories lately of off-the-rails young women with vexed and troubled relationships to their family, race, sexual identity and body.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Rod-Kelly Hines

    I knew this would be great but wow! This memoir-in-verse is stunningly candid, often invoking painful memories that highlight what seems to be universal pain and trauma that black children inherit from their parents. The truth of this touched me while I read because Yrsa Daley-Ward does not shy away from the subject: she points a finger at her mother's parenting, her grandparents religious strictness, the stream of men who treated her as a sexual object, and consequently, her foray into being a I knew this would be great but wow! This memoir-in-verse is stunningly candid, often invoking painful memories that highlight what seems to be universal pain and trauma that black children inherit from their parents. The truth of this touched me while I read because Yrsa Daley-Ward does not shy away from the subject: she points a finger at her mother's parenting, her grandparents religious strictness, the stream of men who treated her as a sexual object, and consequently, her foray into being a sex worker... She mediates on depression and her battle with drugs and alcohol; her mother's death from breast cancer, her father's death before she could even meet him and on and on. This is a litany of pain and ultimately the transcendence of that pain: she helped me understand that "the terrible" thing that may seem a destructive force in our lives is really just one part of who we are, and it actually has the power to save us.

  4. 5 out of 5

    leynes

    Disclaimer: I won this book for my BookTubeAThon Book Dominoes Challenge (woop woop!), I wasn't asked to review it but since I got it for free and wouldn't have picked it up on my own I think it's important to mention that. /// I always feel like the ultimate asshole when I rate biographies and memoirs low because who am I to judge another person's life or how a person decided to share their experiences with the world, yet here we are. And I feel like a douche saying it: but The Terrible was pre Disclaimer: I won this book for my BookTubeAThon Book Dominoes Challenge (woop woop!), I wasn't asked to review it but since I got it for free and wouldn't have picked it up on my own I think it's important to mention that. /// I always feel like the ultimate asshole when I rate biographies and memoirs low because who am I to judge another person's life or how a person decided to share their experiences with the world, yet here we are. And I feel like a douche saying it: but The Terrible was pretty dang terrible. I don't think I've ever read a memoir that was as badly written, and that is coming from a girl who highkey struggled with Trevor Noah's Born A Crime. Yrsa Daley-Ward is a poet. She has published her first poetry collection Bone to great success in 2014. She belongs to the new generation of modern poets, the ones that get easily belittled and referred to as "Insta Poets". Now, I don't want to disrespect her or her work, and I genuinely believe that poetry comes in many different shapes and forms, but this particular style of poetry is totally 100% absolutely not for me. It isn't original and seems very "copy & paste". By "this style", I refer to modern poets who count on simplicity and loose structures, whose poems are often made up of just a few sentences. Again, nothing wrong with that, it just doesn't work for me. The reason why I was still excited to pick up The Terrible was the fact that this is a lyrical memoir, not a traditional poetry collection. Yrsa talks about her life, her upbringing in particular, about all the things that happened to her, 'even the Terrible Things (and God, there were Terrible Things)'. Born to a Jamaican mother and a Nigerian father, Yrsa was raised by her devout Seventh-Day Adventist grandparents in the small town of Chorley in the north of England. Other major influences in her life are, of course, her careworn mother Marcia, Linford (the man formerly known as Dad, 'half-fun, half-frightening') and her little brother Roo, who 'sees things written in the stars'. It's about growing up and discovering the power and fear of her own sexuality, of pitch grey days of pills and powder and encounters. It's about damage and pain, but also joy. Intentionally, Yrsa chose verse over prose as a means to tell her story. Unfortunately, that style didn't work for me. I think that The Terrible is extremely badly written, and the fact that Yrsa tried to be poetic in her writing made everything even more terrible (no pun intended). Her life and all of the things she had to endure growing up would've made the perfect foundation for a memoir. For a woman so young, she sure as hell has gone through a lot already. She grew up extremely poor and under extremely shady circumstances, her stepdad is honestly one of the creepiest men I've read about in a while. The moments that got the most under my skin were the ones in which Yrsa narrates how her mother tried to protect her from the sexual advances of her stepdad when Yrsa was as little as seven years old. In her late teens, she worked as a sex worker and did a lot of drugs. She grew estranged from her family, wanted to be independent. The only reason why I rated this memoir two instead of just one star is exactly that reason: her life story had the potential of being compelling. I appreciate the fact that she shared it with the world. We need more Black female writers writing unapologetically about what they had to endure, how they create art, what life means to them. I, for my part, hold no grudge against Yrsa in any shape or form. I'm glad she's out here striving, her work is just not for me. I try to incorporate quotes into my reviews, I just couldn't find any in this collection that were worth sharing. Everything I underlined was rather cheesy or generic. But that's okay. There are many readers who differ with me on this subject and who are out there eating that shit up. And that's okay too.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Alice Lippart

    Beautiful, raw and honest.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Nina

    A few months ago I read Bone, and the only thing I had to say at first was that I so badly wanted to hear the poetry spoken out loud. Then, at the beginning of June, I actually got the opportunity to see Yrsa, as her book tour for The Terrible had a stop in my city. Listening to her speak was as beautiful and as powerful as I had imagined, and walking out of that bookshop, I felt so inspired. Since that day I’ve had a copy of The Terrible, but have been waiting for the right time to read it. Thi A few months ago I read Bone, and the only thing I had to say at first was that I so badly wanted to hear the poetry spoken out loud. Then, at the beginning of June, I actually got the opportunity to see Yrsa, as her book tour for The Terrible had a stop in my city. Listening to her speak was as beautiful and as powerful as I had imagined, and walking out of that bookshop, I felt so inspired. Since that day I’ve had a copy of The Terrible, but have been waiting for the right time to read it. This week was the right time for me. I can tell you now that I will come back to this book over and over and over again. It’s not the kind of novel that you can read once and truly appreciate every aspect, because it is so multilayered. It’s a memoir with elements of poetry and magic, and I was surprised at how much some of it hit home, particularly the parts about her grandparents. I also spent a lot of time when I was younger with my Caribbean grandparents, and even though Montserratian and Jamaican cultures are very different, there were certain things that made me laugh out loud because they were so accurate! My grandad passed away recently, and reading about her grandparents really filled me with a kind of warmth. I also loved how brutally honest it is. I think it’s quite easy, especially when writing about something personal, to soften it at the edges to make it more palatable, more readable. Yrsa doesn’t seem to do that, and I think that made me enjoy the novel so much more. I was able to connect with the author and her story, because she was so human and flawed and that’s what made it so wonderful. She’s unapologetically honest and herself, and I really admire that. So yeah - go out and get yourself this book.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Nikita Gill

    I love Yrsa Daley-Ward. I love the way she visualises her world. I love the way her brain works, and the way she puts pen to paper. Her work on instagram is gorgeous, but this, this was something otherworldly altogether. To make it clear, I have not yet read Bone, so this is the first full body of work I have read by Daley-Ward and it stunned me. Her command over language, her effective and simple way of telling an explosive story, it's all there. All of it. I wept for her in this memoir. I foun I love Yrsa Daley-Ward. I love the way she visualises her world. I love the way her brain works, and the way she puts pen to paper. Her work on instagram is gorgeous, but this, this was something otherworldly altogether. To make it clear, I have not yet read Bone, so this is the first full body of work I have read by Daley-Ward and it stunned me. Her command over language, her effective and simple way of telling an explosive story, it's all there. All of it. I wept for her in this memoir. I found my hands shaking with fear and anticipation more than once. And incredible book by an incredible writer. And I cannot wait to read more.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Lara Kareem

    This book is so terribly good, it carries Yrsa's essence from the onset to the end. It is one dark tale, with glimpses of lights here and there, but so dark and powerful, Yrsa can't help but capture my attention with her story. To me this memoir is one of a kind because it is truly a piece of art, it's like reading a beautiful long poem, verse-prose? that starts with how she came to be in this terrible hard world and how from an early age she had to learn to always look out for herself, in order This book is so terribly good, it carries Yrsa's essence from the onset to the end. It is one dark tale, with glimpses of lights here and there, but so dark and powerful, Yrsa can't help but capture my attention with her story. To me this memoir is one of a kind because it is truly a piece of art, it's like reading a beautiful long poem, verse-prose? that starts with how she came to be in this terrible hard world and how from an early age she had to learn to always look out for herself, in order to not get swallowed up. The books touches on the power of the feminine sexuality, being sexually intimate from a young age, embracing being queer, despite religion, infidelity, confusion as well as discovering oneself, neglect, dealing with mental issues, parenthood, family, race and immigration etc. Even now after almost two days of reading this book, it still lingers on my soul, the words I've read and digested painted across my being. All I can say is you give this memoir a try, and fall in love with Yrsa's writing. The Terrible by Yrsa Daley-Ward is deep-cutting and an amazing example of the art of storytelling—when writing is done well to encompass the truth.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Melody

    4.5 stars - An emotional sucker punch. Don’t you know you’re one of the lucky one? shouts the terrible. Don’t you know I’ve got you, you ungrateful, ungrateful creature? You wretch! Don’t you know those dark times kept you stronger? (thus sayeth the terrible). Don’t you know without me you would be just another girl with an everyday life and an almost-house always under construction and a man you tolerate and don’t really love and a father you met but who stopped you from doing anything and seei 4.5 stars - An emotional sucker punch. Don’t you know you’re one of the lucky one? shouts the terrible. Don’t you know I’ve got you, you ungrateful, ungrateful creature? You wretch! Don’t you know those dark times kept you stronger? (thus sayeth the terrible). Don’t you know without me you would be just another girl with an everyday life and an almost-house always under construction and a man you tolerate and don’t really love and a father you met but who stopped you from doing anything and seeing the world, don’t you know you’d be a boring woman with bills and a horrible job and wrinkles around her eyes and babies and babies and a mortgage and savings and boring sex or no sex and a lukewarm life, DON’T YOU KNOW I FUCKING KEPT YOU SAFE??? Daley-Ward 'lyrical memoir' recounts a childhood of longing and isolation, a too-early maturation, and an adolescence full of sex, drugs, and heartbreaking decisions. Difficult to read, but hard to put down, it is a raw, brutally candid story of the author's lifelong insecurities and the sense of hopeless darkness - the 'terrible' - that drives her to self-destruction. Knowing this is a personal account kept my heart in my throat; at times I almost felt it was too intimate for me to read. I admire Daley-Ward not only for the brilliant prose-poetry of her words, but for her courage in sharing them.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Laura King

    Incredible memoir that feels more like verse than prose. So sad and gorgeous and compelling.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Gabriella

    I was excited to read this book, because while I'm not really a fan of Yrsa Daley Ward's poetry, I do think the clarity she employs in that work would make for an intriguing memoir. Not many things here are new experiences—oppressively religious grandparents, confusing and/or concerning childhood experiences with sexuality, and lots of self-despair, all of which funnel into a gripping depression beginning in Daley-Ward's young adult years, which we are still in the thick of by the end of this mem I was excited to read this book, because while I'm not really a fan of Yrsa Daley Ward's poetry, I do think the clarity she employs in that work would make for an intriguing memoir. Not many things here are new experiences—oppressively religious grandparents, confusing and/or concerning childhood experiences with sexuality, and lots of self-despair, all of which funnel into a gripping depression beginning in Daley-Ward's young adult years, which we are still in the thick of by the end of this memoir. To her credit, these situations are described very well, as her brand of "storytelling" is both jarring and intimate, allowing readers a window seat into every emotion she describes. At the same time, she carries none of the graceful, trite pleasantries she could have described her life happenings with. While another memoirist would have been stifled from telling her full story due to a respect for elders, confines of feminine propriety, and so on, Daley-Ward tells her truth with a child's blunt honesty and a teenager's grudge, making for a story that gives no character the easy treatment. Despite all these strengths, I felt like we travelled from her teenage years to young adulthood much too quickly, and confusingly. One day we wake up and she's doing ecstasy with another escort co-worker, and I just wasn't sure where/when the shift occurred. It's partially because this shift does NOT occur from a narrative perspective—in describing her early adult life, Daley-Ward never quite loses that teenager's rash, crestfallen perspective on the world, in a way that makes this book seem hasty and stunted. The end of this book felt very underprepared, with no real revelation or conclusion to these stories that I could find, and I think it's partially because our narrator hasn't yet found them herself. I think books like these are one of those arguments for people waiting until they're older to recount their "life stories" in a memoir. Daley-Ward is only 29, and you can tell that she hasn't quite come to terms with her experiences in a way that could offer a clear arc to them. I'd love to see what this book might have looked like had it been written another 10 years down the road...

  12. 5 out of 5

    Jen Pennington

    So glad I stumbled upon Yrsa Daley-Ward this year. Reading her work is like holding a beating heart in your hand. So alive and frightening and exciting and rare.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Louise Pennington

    The Terrible is simply exquisite.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Darkowaa

    Review to come! I’m leaning towards 4.5 stars...

  15. 5 out of 5

    Cardyn Brooks

    The following review first appeared on MediaDiversified.org June 3, 2018. Similar to the ways in which Billie Holiday and John Coltrane used the same musical notes and scales as other musicians yet managed to produce otherworldly compositions exponentially more complex than the sum of their individual elements, in The Terrible Yrsa Daley Ward has crafted a ballad of her life in prose poetry that exceeds conventional expectations of a memoir. A prologue, four numbered sections, and an epilogue pr The following review first appeared on MediaDiversified.org June 3, 2018. Similar to the ways in which Billie Holiday and John Coltrane used the same musical notes and scales as other musicians yet managed to produce otherworldly compositions exponentially more complex than the sum of their individual elements, in The Terrible Yrsa Daley Ward has crafted a ballad of her life in prose poetry that exceeds conventional expectations of a memoir. A prologue, four numbered sections, and an epilogue produce a score of varying measure and tempo, volume and intensity. The rhythm of her revelations is supported by the layout of each page. This score also functions as a map of her many struggles with fatherlessness, family friction, undiagnosed and untreated mental health issues, self-medicating with controlled substances and risky behavior, sexual identity, grief, and internalized racism, misogyny, colorism, and classism. Trying to satisfy her insatiable needs and appetites, which seem to be manifestations of her longing for permanence and reliable love, is a recurring motif. On page 68 she writes, “I wanted to… be completely adored and wanted and loved; I was sure of the heaven in that.” The Terrible documents her circuitous and dangerous search. Along the way the challenges in distinguishing fact from fiction regularly surface. The quirks of memory are mentioned on page 114 with “Sometimes the facts around our first meeting change.” And on page 165 a loved one’s ghost asks, “Can’t you see that by now I am entirely fact and entirely fiction?” This question resonates as an echo of the broader idea of memoirs as non-fiction because human recollections are influenced by circumstances and the passage of time. Maybe even the most honestly rendered memoirs are impressionistic works that convey the essential truth of a person’s experiences instead of an exact account. Yrsa Daley-Ward imbues each description of terrible things with multiple facets of menace and painful consequences. In “awayness [sic]: an almanac” beginning on page 196 “the terrible” is a sentient entity acting as a schizophrenic hydra trickster parasite who harangues, distorts, and drains its host, but not completely or permanently. The Terrible begins with love and ends with hope. There are few shining examples of manhood in The Terrible. Picking up a biography about Nelson Mandela or Sidney Poitier’s autobiography might help balance the emotional scales for disheartened readers. Dark Girls by Bill Duke and Daughters of Men: Portraits of African-American Women and Their Fathers by Rachel Vassel also offer mitigating spiritual boosts after reading this beautifully composed, emotionally wrenching memoir.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Denise Cormaney

    Finished this one in a day. Whoa. I've never read anything like it. Sometimes we hear a story about someone who has labels that society is quick to judge (drug user, prostitute, private dancer/escort), and it's easy to see those labels and jump to those judgments, all the while forgetting the person is a human being with a story that led to the present circumstances. And chances are, this human being did not start out in life with a stable home environment and loving parents who one day dreamed Finished this one in a day. Whoa. I've never read anything like it. Sometimes we hear a story about someone who has labels that society is quick to judge (drug user, prostitute, private dancer/escort), and it's easy to see those labels and jump to those judgments, all the while forgetting the person is a human being with a story that led to the present circumstances. And chances are, this human being did not start out in life with a stable home environment and loving parents who one day dreamed that she'd become a drug user/prostitute/private dancer/escort. Some painful, awful shit went down to get from there to here. This memoir tells that story. But it is unlike any other memoir I've ever read. It's as if you sat down for coffee with a stranger and she just started at the beginning, in a stream-of-consciousness narrative that immediately draws you in. Normally I don't like this style of writing, but it works here: there's a sense of urgency, as if she needs to get her story out of her soul and into yours before she loses her nerve, and she can't waste time with proper prose form and evenly timed paragraphs. And there is zero sense of vying for sympathy, or even a redemption story. (I kept waiting for it, the redemption part. We all love a redemption story, don't we? This is not that. This reads like she barely made it out alive to write it all down.) It knocked me out.

  17. 5 out of 5

    flannery

    This is a good story but it's written as a poem, to no real effect, and I was like why.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Laurel May

    You know those writers who make you want to write? That's Yrsa Daley-Ward. She is forever inspiring me and I'm so grateful she shared her story (so far) with us. This was such an incredible, beautifully written and powerful memoir.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Priyanka Sofia

    I think Ysra Daley-Ward is very brave for writing this and there are some beautiful sections/lines, but overall there were too many stylistic tricks that served absolutely no purpose, which ultimately made this a rather unsatisfying read.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Mentai

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. 4.5 The Terrible is a compelling read, at times lovely, many others, heart wrenching. As the memoir wore on it became less original, perhaps I was unsatisfied with the way the 'resolution' was conveyed, or it seemed to end too abruptly. Maybe that's a sign of the book's success -- despite the poetry, line breaks and formal inventiveness, I read The Terrible like a novel with a plot. I wanted to know what happened to these characters. The most important element about Daley-Ward's book is the poeti 4.5 The Terrible is a compelling read, at times lovely, many others, heart wrenching. As the memoir wore on it became less original, perhaps I was unsatisfied with the way the 'resolution' was conveyed, or it seemed to end too abruptly. Maybe that's a sign of the book's success -- despite the poetry, line breaks and formal inventiveness, I read The Terrible like a novel with a plot. I wanted to know what happened to these characters. The most important element about Daley-Ward's book is the poetic treatment of depression and race, in other words, the impact of long-term racism and patriarchy on the body and mind of a young girl and woman. The presence of northwestern England, predominantly white, is also glowering in the verse. So the family relationships that Daley-Ward establishes at the beginning of the work are especially touching and vivid against this. I'm not sure if it was because of how the book was structured, of how I took in the sequence, or because of 'the terrible' -- the depression -- but towards the end, I found that these relationships became very fragmented (of course, relationships change over time and can be fragmented, but I think something deeper might have been conveyed in the poetic imagery.) Now that I have read Daley-Ward's "bone", this end sequence almost reads as a complement to it, to the bones... All up, I loved Daley-Ward's turn of phrase, her efficiency with language, her honesty, and her style, and this is a book I'd love to own.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Wade Snowden

    Florence Welch, of Florence + The Machine, says that Yrsa’s works is like “holding the truth in your hands.” That perfectly sums up how I feels. Her first collection, “bone,” was incredible, and I am so glad this went even further with her craft. Yrsa Daley-Ward is an extraordinary story teller, and I suggest you run to pick up her work

  22. 4 out of 5

    Tamina

    Such a great read, and an incredible, sometimes dark story being told. The style of writing switches between poetry and prose throughout. I found myself unable to put it down! Read it in a few days :)

  23. 4 out of 5

    Zish

    Gorgeous writing. How does she take a tough life and convey it so beautifully?

  24. 4 out of 5

    Samantha (AK)

    Everyone has a story to tell, but not everyone knows how to tell a story. Often, the likability of a given memoir comes down not to the content, but the way in which the story is told. That said, a lot of people are going to bounce off this book. Told in a stream-of-consciousness narrative that’s somewhere between plain verse and experimental prose, the size and placement of a word on the page as important as it’s dictionary meaning… it’s not the most accessible style. I think it works, though, f Everyone has a story to tell, but not everyone knows how to tell a story. Often, the likability of a given memoir comes down not to the content, but the way in which the story is told. That said, a lot of people are going to bounce off this book. Told in a stream-of-consciousness narrative that’s somewhere between plain verse and experimental prose, the size and placement of a word on the page as important as it’s dictionary meaning… it’s not the most accessible style. I think it works, though, for what the author is trying to do. From a difficult home, through mental illness and drug abuse, through prostitution and a family-member’s attempted suicide, the author doesn’t flinch from the footprints of her life, but points each of them out in turn. There’s no sense of justification, or of excuses; Daley-Ward simply lays bare her life, with all its circumstances and choices, whether they be good or bad. “This is how I got here,” she says. “This is the life from which my stories spring.” There’s no deeper lesson or metaphor being pushed; her life simply is, and you can take it or leave it. For me? I’ll take it. At least in the moment. In terms of both content and format, it was an interesting read. I don’t know that I loved it or anything, but it was a unique perspective on a lot of loaded issues.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Shahd Fadlalmoula

    Yrsa Daley-Ward has a heavy hard story to tell. Still she tells it with the most brilliant grace. To be completely honest, I had doubts when I heard that her next book was going to be a memoir, but I'm so glad I didn't give into those doubts. Yrsa has lived a full life, it hasn't been easy, but getting a glimpse of the diamond's shinning makes the jewel all the more valuable. I can safely say this memoir has given the ability to find more depth and appreciation in Yrsa's [already profoundly movi Yrsa Daley-Ward has a heavy hard story to tell. Still she tells it with the most brilliant grace. To be completely honest, I had doubts when I heard that her next book was going to be a memoir, but I'm so glad I didn't give into those doubts. Yrsa has lived a full life, it hasn't been easy, but getting a glimpse of the diamond's shinning makes the jewel all the more valuable. I can safely say this memoir has given the ability to find more depth and appreciation in Yrsa's [already profoundly moving] poetry [Bone]. Although there were very many specific experiences that are unique to her, it wasn't hard to find universal language and messages in the book. Specifically the incidents in the end, and peppered throughout in some way, about mental health. Long story short, if you're already familiar with Yrsa's work, this will be a new Avenue to see her, and appreciate her through. If you aren't, pick it up and you definitely will not be disappointed!

  26. 5 out of 5

    Christina

    It was off to a slow start, but once I got into reading this book, I could not put it down. I enjoyed the style of writing and storytelling. It was poetic, dramatic, and tragic. I loved Daley-Ward's poetry book BONES, so picking up this book at the bookstore, I knew would not disappoint. Yrsa Daley-Ward is a pleasure to read. I would recommend this book, whether you know her as a poet or not. It is a heart-wrenching story of survival and love, of being an artist, of loving yourself and hating yo It was off to a slow start, but once I got into reading this book, I could not put it down. I enjoyed the style of writing and storytelling. It was poetic, dramatic, and tragic. I loved Daley-Ward's poetry book BONES, so picking up this book at the bookstore, I knew would not disappoint. Yrsa Daley-Ward is a pleasure to read. I would recommend this book, whether you know her as a poet or not. It is a heart-wrenching story of survival and love, of being an artist, of loving yourself and hating yourself simultaneously. Books like this are eye-opening and give storytelling a new comeback. Bravo!

  27. 4 out of 5

    Abbi

    "They are not ours, the stars, and never have been." I won't even try to pretend to remember how I came across Yrsa Daley-Ward's memoir but I'm happy that I did. Fact. I loved the style and format of this book, as well as her story even the difficult things she experienced. I'm definitely going to read Bone.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Patty Abarno

    This was such a beautifully written memoir. Powerful and magical but also dark and haunting. The story flowed so beautifully from beginning to the end. Such a unique and memorable experience. Worth the read!

  29. 5 out of 5

    Michelle

    I loved it! Open and raw and beautiful! Thank you Yrsa! I listened to this on audible and her voice truly brought it to life.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Gabrielle Van Wyk

    The poetry in this book carried it. Not surprising at all considering the author, what surprised me was how absolutely lacking the prose was. It wasn't neat or well-written and the subject matter was less captivating than it could have been. I did not feel as though I understood Daley-Ward any better after reading her memoir than I did after reading her poetry. And in fact those dark truths that make her poetry so beautiful and haunting were missing from this novel. 3.5 stars.

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