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The Mere Wife

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Two mothers—a suburban housewife and a battle-hardened veteran—struggle to protect those they love in this modern retelling of Beowulf. From the perspective of those who live in Herot Hall, the suburb is a paradise. Picket fences divide buildings—high and gabled—and the community is entirely self-sustaining. Each house has its own fireplace, each fireplace is fitted with a Two mothers—a suburban housewife and a battle-hardened veteran—struggle to protect those they love in this modern retelling of Beowulf. From the perspective of those who live in Herot Hall, the suburb is a paradise. Picket fences divide buildings—high and gabled—and the community is entirely self-sustaining. Each house has its own fireplace, each fireplace is fitted with a container of lighter fluid, and outside—in lawns and on playgrounds—wildflowers seed themselves in neat rows. But for those who live surreptitiously along Herot Hall’s periphery, the subdivision is a fortress guarded by an intense network of gates, surveillance cameras, and motion-activated lights. For Willa, the wife of Roger Herot (heir of Herot Hall), life moves at a charmingly slow pace. She flits between mommy groups, playdates, cocktail hour, and dinner parties, always with her son, Dylan, in tow. Meanwhile, in a cave in the mountains just beyond the limits of Herot Hall lives Gren, short for Grendel, as well as his mother, Dana, a former soldier who gave birth as if by chance. Dana didn’t want Gren, didn’t plan Gren, and doesn’t know how she got Gren, but when she returned from war, there he was. When Gren, unaware of the borders erected to keep him at bay, ventures into Herot Hall and runs off with Dylan, Dana’s and Willa’s worlds collide.


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Two mothers—a suburban housewife and a battle-hardened veteran—struggle to protect those they love in this modern retelling of Beowulf. From the perspective of those who live in Herot Hall, the suburb is a paradise. Picket fences divide buildings—high and gabled—and the community is entirely self-sustaining. Each house has its own fireplace, each fireplace is fitted with a Two mothers—a suburban housewife and a battle-hardened veteran—struggle to protect those they love in this modern retelling of Beowulf. From the perspective of those who live in Herot Hall, the suburb is a paradise. Picket fences divide buildings—high and gabled—and the community is entirely self-sustaining. Each house has its own fireplace, each fireplace is fitted with a container of lighter fluid, and outside—in lawns and on playgrounds—wildflowers seed themselves in neat rows. But for those who live surreptitiously along Herot Hall’s periphery, the subdivision is a fortress guarded by an intense network of gates, surveillance cameras, and motion-activated lights. For Willa, the wife of Roger Herot (heir of Herot Hall), life moves at a charmingly slow pace. She flits between mommy groups, playdates, cocktail hour, and dinner parties, always with her son, Dylan, in tow. Meanwhile, in a cave in the mountains just beyond the limits of Herot Hall lives Gren, short for Grendel, as well as his mother, Dana, a former soldier who gave birth as if by chance. Dana didn’t want Gren, didn’t plan Gren, and doesn’t know how she got Gren, but when she returned from war, there he was. When Gren, unaware of the borders erected to keep him at bay, ventures into Herot Hall and runs off with Dylan, Dana’s and Willa’s worlds collide.

30 review for The Mere Wife

  1. 4 out of 5

    karen

    a suburban retelling of Beowulf?? oh, this could be SO GOOD. please be so good.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Ron Charles

    You don’t need to be a Tolkien-level expert in Old English to enjoy “The Mere Wife,” but it helps if you enjoyed Seamus Heaney’s glorious translation of “Beowulf” or endured that bizarre animated version written by Neil Gaiman and Roger Avary, starring Angelina Jolie as the least convincing (and most naked) incarnation of Grendel’s mother. Headley borrows, twists and repurposes everything from her source text, sometimes riding parallel to the original and sometimes abandoning it altogether. The d You don’t need to be a Tolkien-level expert in Old English to enjoy “The Mere Wife,” but it helps if you enjoyed Seamus Heaney’s glorious translation of “Beowulf” or endured that bizarre animated version written by Neil Gaiman and Roger Avary, starring Angelina Jolie as the least convincing (and most naked) incarnation of Grendel’s mother. Headley borrows, twists and repurposes everything from her source text, sometimes riding parallel to the original and sometimes abandoning it altogether. The dexterity of Headley’s wit is evident right there in her title, “The Mere Wife.” That’s a sly pun on the ancient and modern meanings of “mere,” denoting both “lake” and “insignificant.” But there’s more than one wife drowning in insignificance in this novel. From start to finish, this is a story about where women take refuge and how they wield power. Chapter by chapter, we hear about them in different voices: first person and third person, along with a chorus of older women that sounds closer to a Greek tragedy than an Anglo-Saxon poem. . . . To read the rest of this review, go to The Washington Post: https://www.washingtonpost.com/entert... To watch the Totally Hip Video Book Review of 'The Mere Wife,' click here: https://www.washingtonpost.com/video/...

  3. 4 out of 5

    Edward Lorn

    Headley weaves new cloth into the aged tapestry of BEOWULF, providing enough new material to remake the tale without ruining or so much as stressing the original seams. Everything fits perfectly. THE MERE WIFE is a master class of tailored prose, a stunning achieve that I cannot say anything ill toward. On track to be my book of the year.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Jenia

    Listen. There's lots of ways I could start this review. I'm going to start it with, "The Mere Wife is a retelling of Beowulf in the suburbs," because this is easily one of the best books I've read this year and that's the best elevator pitch I can offer. The book centres on Dana Mills, an American marine who goes to fight overseas in the War on Terror. She gets captured, is executed on camera... and then wakes up 6 months later, pregnant. Scared of what might happen to her and her possibly-miracl Listen. There's lots of ways I could start this review. I'm going to start it with, "The Mere Wife is a retelling of Beowulf in the suburbs," because this is easily one of the best books I've read this year and that's the best elevator pitch I can offer. The book centres on Dana Mills, an American marine who goes to fight overseas in the War on Terror. She gets captured, is executed on camera... and then wakes up 6 months later, pregnant. Scared of what might happen to her and her possibly-miracle, possibly-monster baby, she flees back to her old home at the foot of an ancient mountain. But while Dana was overseas, her old neighbourhood was bulldozed and replaced with the high class, picket-fence-and-dinner-parties suburb Herot Hall. She settles in old tunnels within the mountain instead, content to raise her son, Gren, quietly within those confines. Gren, on the other hand, is not content. And thus Dana's world and the world of Herot Hall begin to collide. Lately I've stumbled across a few "feminist retellings" of older, male-centric works. I'm not sure if it's a current trend in SFF or if I just got lucky, but either way I am into it. I'm unfortunately far less familiar with Beowulf than I was with Circe's myths, but oh did it draw me in every bit as strongly. In the original (Wiki tells me), the warrior Beowulf slays the monster Grendel and then his mother — referred to only as 'Grendel's mother' — seeks revenge on Beowulf and is slain by him as well. In act 3, Bewoulf also kills a dragon. In this reinterpretation, the focus is on both "monster" and mother, offering a different reasoning for their actions and not necessarily the same fate. But the focus is equally on Willa, the seemingly perfect hostess of Herot Hall, and her young son Dylan. The Mere Wife is a book about parallels and opposites. For both women, their opposite is the invader, the "other". For both boys, their opposite is something to be curious about, to want to get to know. While Dana, with her fierceness and protective love, was my favourite, I equally enjoyed all the characters. All of them are flawed and the motivations of even the most flawed are understandable. (Yes, I promise Beowulf himself shows up eventually.) The book explores other themes too. The effects of war trauma. Gated communities and gentrification. Love across boundaries. A parent's desire to protect vs a child's desire to explore. The price of power for the "women behind the throne". A mother's terror when her son looks different enough to be targeted. At the core of each of these struggles remains the division between "one of us" and "the dangerous them", something that frankly feels very current and relevant today. The duality is also seen in the fantastical elements of the book. In terms of genre I think it's best put as "magical realism". You can take everything as presented — Gren is an inhuman monster; Dana came back to life; Act 3, like the original, features a dragon. You can equally take it as a soldier suffering from brutal PTSD. I'm still not sure which reading I prefer. Both, in parallel, I suppose. This uncertainty is further heightened by the absolutely gorgeous writing. Is it a metaphor or is it something fantastical? The book feels almost poetic, very fitting for a modernisation of an ancient saga. I particularly loved the interludes from the perspective of several "Greek choruses", from the spirits/natural inhabitants of the mountain to the pack of mothers/grandmothers of Herot Hall. The excellent audiobook version, narrated by Susan Bennett, also enhances the poetry-like prose. So. The next step for me will probably be to turn to the beautiful Beowulf that's currently collecting dust on my parent's shelf. The next step for you, I very much hope, will be to turn to the first chapter of The Mere Wife: The hall loomed golden towers antler-tipped; it was asking for burning, but that hadn't happened yet. You know how it is: Every castle wants invading, and every family has enemies born within it. Old grudges boil up. Listen. I especially recommend this book for: - Fans of mythological retellings - Magical realism fans - "Literary fantasy" fans - But ones who enjoy the occasional fast-paced action scenes amidst thematic exploration of the human condition. Look, this is based on a story that has three epic, badass battles after all. - People interested in female warriors, after the war - Fans of Madeline Miller's Circe - People interested in explorations of the "other" - English lit students who want to raise their hand in Beowulf 101 next Autumn and go, "Um excuse me professor, but "aglæcwif" can also mean "woman-warrior", not just "monstrous hell bride"; in fact I read this interesting book this summer about..."

  5. 5 out of 5

    Tamsien West (Babbling Books)

    This book is EXCELLENT. I don't really have words for how enthralled I was by it. The style and language were poetic, the story was really engaging and there were so many layers. A feminist, modern day retelling of Beowulf - apparently that is what was missing from my life. The moment I finished I wanted to go right back to the start and read it again. Instant favourite.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Alex

    I was promised Beowulf in the suburbs, and here's the problem: it isn't. Does Headley know that you can't just name a character Grendel and call it a day? If she'd billed it as loosely-related Beowulf slash fic, that'd be one thing - it would, seriously, it would be one thing - it would be this thing minus the pretentious parts. What Headley has done here is, she's gotten the plot wrong. Look, no, what do you know about the plot of Beowulf? Dude fights Grendel and then he has to fight Grendel's m I was promised Beowulf in the suburbs, and here's the problem: it isn't. Does Headley know that you can't just name a character Grendel and call it a day? If she'd billed it as loosely-related Beowulf slash fic, that'd be one thing - it would, seriously, it would be one thing - it would be this thing minus the pretentious parts. What Headley has done here is, she's gotten the plot wrong. Look, no, what do you know about the plot of Beowulf? Dude fights Grendel and then he has to fight Grendel's mom, right? That's the deal. Later he fights a dragon but nobody cares. The Beowulf author does some fun stuff with, like, who's really the bad guy here, and Headley picked up on that, but she didn't pick up on what actually happened at any point in the story so almost none of the important parts are particularly here. None of the unimportant parts are either, so don't go getting your dragon pants on. You know what else is, you have to decide whether you're writing a satire or not. You can't just, like, see how it goes. We end up in this horrific muddle where half the plot is a Real Housewives satire and the other half is some kind of earnest racial thing or whatever, and maybe the Furies show up? And all of it's written by someone who feels like she's really hoping to get an A- in her senior writing seminar, and it's just a fucking mess. I have examples, here's some bullshit Headley wrote: We are a white deer and we are a black raven and we are blood in the snow. We are a sword made of old metal and we are a gun filled with old bullets and we are a woman standing before her mother’s bones, holding her family treasure, broken. Oh man, it's so boring. Particularly toward the end, where the action thinks it's picking up but she starts banging on with bullshit like this for pages and pages, and you're like what is even happening here, like literally you're off on so much D&D poetry that I can't even tell who's getting stabbed with what dumb old sword. Listen, somebody goes and writes "Beowulf in the suburbs" on the cover and a lot of us are going to read it. That sounds great. It could be great! But it's not this book, which isn't even decent slash fic.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Charlie Anders

    The Mere Wife is getting a ton of acclaim, and justly so. This retelling of the Beowulf legend focuses on two women: Grendel's mother Dana (a veteran of Middle East conflicts who came home mysteriously pregnant) and Willa Herot, the rich suburban woman who ends up marrying Beowulf. (In this version, Beowulf is called Ben Woolf). It's a story about women trying (mostly in vain) to protect their sons, and to deal with past traumas. But also, it's about displacement, because Willa Herot's fancy gat The Mere Wife is getting a ton of acclaim, and justly so. This retelling of the Beowulf legend focuses on two women: Grendel's mother Dana (a veteran of Middle East conflicts who came home mysteriously pregnant) and Willa Herot, the rich suburban woman who ends up marrying Beowulf. (In this version, Beowulf is called Ben Woolf). It's a story about women trying (mostly in vain) to protect their sons, and to deal with past traumas. But also, it's about displacement, because Willa Herot's fancy gated community has been built over the town that Dana grew up in, and the bones of Dana's long-buried ancestors are somewhere underneath Herot Hall. Also, the relationship between Dana's son Gren(del) and Willa's son Dylan is really beautiful and understated, and I loved all the stuff of these two boys finding each other when they're on opposite sides of this huge divide of class and history. Also, the "Greek Chorus" sections, where various suburban mothers and spirits of the mountain, and even a pack of police dogs, comment on the action, are just gorgeous and brilliant. Headley writes beautifully and almost every page had a passage that I found myself pausing to re-read. My only quibble is with the ending, because it felt as though some pieces were falling into place a bit too neatly, while other stuff was left unresolved for no particular reason. But overall, it's a gorgeous piece of work, and even if you aren't particularly steeped in the Beowulf story, you'll find a lot to admire in the story of these two women who are each trapped in their own illusions, unable to understand each other. Super recommended. Edited to add: I've had so many conversations about this book since I've read it, and I've kept thinking about it, and I was lucky enough to hear the author read from it recently. I have a feeling this is going to be one of those books that we're all going to be talking about for a long long time.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Jessica Woodbury

    Both dream-like and razor sharp, this is technically a retelling of Beowulf but don't worry about remembering it from way back in high school. An avant garde Big Little Lies, looking at mothers and sons and the ways women build power and strength.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Christopher Alonso

    Maria Dahvana Headley has created a modern retelling of the epic Beowulf. Here, Headley uses the tale as the basis for a novel about privilege, class, rage, gentrification, whiteness, and the role of women. Of all of Headley's books, this, I think, is her most lyrical, sometimes begging to be read aloud, much like the epic would have been read aloud. Headley observes the role of women, particularly mothers, how pressure from others can change people in ways they never could have imagined. It pos Maria Dahvana Headley has created a modern retelling of the epic Beowulf. Here, Headley uses the tale as the basis for a novel about privilege, class, rage, gentrification, whiteness, and the role of women. Of all of Headley's books, this, I think, is her most lyrical, sometimes begging to be read aloud, much like the epic would have been read aloud. Headley observes the role of women, particularly mothers, how pressure from others can change people in ways they never could have imagined. It poses the notion--whether monsters are made or they're born, waiting to be seen by the world.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Marc

    Allow me to let Ron Charles's Totally Hip Video Book Review summarize this novel for you. As his is a tough act to follow, I'll say that what struck me most about the novel was Headley's prose--short, curt, definitive sentences that punctuate a rather frightening tale in which the monsters we need most fear are ourselves. Perhaps its always been this way, but Headley breathes new life into old fears and the violence within which mothers and women survive and fiercely protect home and offspring.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Fran

    wowwwwww. (to be updated.)

  12. 5 out of 5

    sylvie

    What an engaging read and such beautiful prose. I am not particularly familiar with the literary classic Beowulf, although I did look up a synopsis to get a general idea. This story takes us into modern days. The  protagonists Dana and her son Gren make their home in a cave, while Willa and her son Dylan inhabit the modern gated community Herot Hall. Other characters are Roger, husband  to Willa, father of Dylan. The story kept me engaged from the very beginning to the very end. As the story progre What an engaging read and such beautiful prose. I am not particularly familiar with the literary classic Beowulf, although I did look up a synopsis to get a general idea. This story takes us into modern days. The  protagonists Dana and her son Gren make their home in a cave, while Willa and her son Dylan inhabit the modern gated community Herot Hall. Other characters are Roger, husband  to Willa, father of Dylan. The story kept me engaged from the very beginning to the very end. As the story progresses, prejudice, hate, delusion takes hold of the characters. Reality becomes blurred, through preconceived ideas which lead to violence, murder. Who are the villains? Dana a former Marine? Willa the young housewife of Herot Hall? Any one of the many characters? I highly recommend THE MERE WIFE. It matters not that you are or not familiar with the classic literary work Beowulf,  This novel will take you on a wild ride... Thank you to NetGalley and FSG

  13. 5 out of 5

    Jeremy Brett

    I was fortunate to receive an ARC of this book a week or so ago, and having just finished it, I am left absolutely floored. Obviously I don't want to say much about it, since it won't be out for a few months yet, but it was amazing. It's a modern retelling of "Beowulf", but that description doesn't fully do the book justice. It's passionate, and deeply powerful, and brutal, and an expert chronicle of the things humans do to each other and to themselves. Maria Dahvana Headley, already a wonderful I was fortunate to receive an ARC of this book a week or so ago, and having just finished it, I am left absolutely floored. Obviously I don't want to say much about it, since it won't be out for a few months yet, but it was amazing. It's a modern retelling of "Beowulf", but that description doesn't fully do the book justice. It's passionate, and deeply powerful, and brutal, and an expert chronicle of the things humans do to each other and to themselves. Maria Dahvana Headley, already a wonderful writer, tells a beautiful story about the monsters we make in and of our lives.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Drew

    A fantastic riff on Beowulf, set on a mountain somewhere up the Hudson (or at least it seemed so to me) -- a look at the warriors of modernity, be they soldiers or police or the wives of powerful men. At times, the novel is ~very~ voicey and that takes a bit of work, especially at the outset, but Headley earns every single flourish by taking the oldest epic poem we have and turning it into a story that resonates immensely with our current moment. I loved this and I can't wait for her translation A fantastic riff on Beowulf, set on a mountain somewhere up the Hudson (or at least it seemed so to me) -- a look at the warriors of modernity, be they soldiers or police or the wives of powerful men. At times, the novel is ~very~ voicey and that takes a bit of work, especially at the outset, but Headley earns every single flourish by taking the oldest epic poem we have and turning it into a story that resonates immensely with our current moment. I loved this and I can't wait for her translation of Beowulf itself in a few years' time.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Scribe Publications

    With a sharp eye and a deft flourish, Maria Dahvana Headley reimagines one of our oldest stories to give us a chilling, elemental vision of our latest selves. The Mere Wife is a bold, stunning riptide of a book. Téa Obreht, author of The Tiger’s Wife The Mere Wife is an astonishing reinterpretation of Beowulf: Beowulf in suburbia — epic, operatic, and razor-sharp, a story not of a thick-thewed thegn, but of women at war, as wives and warriors, mothers and matriarchs. Their chosen weapons are as li With a sharp eye and a deft flourish, Maria Dahvana Headley reimagines one of our oldest stories to give us a chilling, elemental vision of our latest selves. The Mere Wife is a bold, stunning riptide of a book. Téa Obreht, author of The Tiger’s Wife The Mere Wife is an astonishing reinterpretation of Beowulf: Beowulf in suburbia — epic, operatic, and razor-sharp, a story not of a thick-thewed thegn, but of women at war, as wives and warriors, mothers and matriarchs. Their chosen weapons are as likely to be swords as public relations and they wield both fearlessly. They rule, they fight. Nicola Griffith, author of Hild Maria Dahvana Headley writes — with crackling headlong sentences that range among old plots and news observations — about a world that earlier today seemed too familiar. Master storyteller, brilliant stylist, a writer with this sort of command of language is a delight to read. Here’s a book to call up an old story in the newest possible way. Samuel R Delany, author of Dhalgren and Dark Reflections The Mere Wife is a work of magic. A wild adventure, a celebration of monsters, myths, and the power of mother-love. Imagine a writer so bold, so ambitious, so about it that she challenges Beowulf to arm wrestle. That writer is Maria Dahvana Headley and let me tell you something, she is here to win. Victor Lavalle, author of The Changeling Maria Dahvana Headley translates the excesses of contemporary life into the gloriously mythic. This is not just an old story in new clothes: this is a consciousness-altering mindtrip of a book. Kelly Link, author of Get in Trouble The most surprising novel I’ve read this year ... Headley is the most fearsome warrior here, lunging and pivoting between ancient and modern realms, skewering class prejudices, defending the helpless and venturing into the dark crevices of our shameful fears. Someday The Mere Wife may take its place alongside such feminist classics as The Wide Sargasso Sea because in its own wicked and wickedly funny way it’s just as insightful about how we make and kill our monsters. Washington Post Imagine the centaur-like hybrid of a Middle Ages warrior saga and a slow-burning drama of domestic ennui and you begin to get a sense of this spiky, arresting story. The Wall Street Journal Maria Dahvana Headley’s new novel, The Mere Wife, is much more than a simple recasting of the ancient epic poem Beowulf in the suburbs. It’s The Stepford Wives, 9/11 and English class thrown into a lyrical blender, and it’s kind of glorious. Associated Press [A] great, heart-wrenching read… I love a book that wrestles me, and makes me think about it after I’ve finished it. If you enjoy battling monsters, I can’t recommend this book enough. Tor.com Bestselling author Maria Dahvana Headley takes a significant gamble in recasting Old English epic Beowulf in the American suburbs – but the gamble pays off. She enhances the themes of the classic with contemporary and feminist accents, creating a work that is both unique and worthy. Christian-Science Monitor’s 10 Best Books of July Headley's language is exquisite and imaginative, the contemporary adaptation on-point and thought provoking – essentially, this is how to retell a classic. Refinery29’s The Best New Books Out This July The lives of two protective mothers in American suburbia collide in [this] fascinating contemporary retelling of Beowulf. Entertainment Weekly Headley (whose own translation [of Beowulf] comes out next year) brings the story of the hero, the monster, and the monster’s mother into contemporary times with uncommon vigor and depth. Boris Kachka, Vulture The Mere Wife [is] an intense, visceral reading experience … [the book is] a revisioning of Beowulf, and Maria finds the bones, the sharp edges, the bleeding heart of that story, and tells it against a modern context. Kat Howard, author of An Unkindness of Magicians Her dystopian novel, The Mere Wife, takes the Old-English epic Beowulf and plunges it into the suburban malaise of Donald Trump’s America. The Saturday Age The Mere Wife is a poetic, transcendental stunner of a novel! Maria Dahvana Headley’s electric storytelling weaves a dark exploration of how everyone has the potential to become or create monsters. A nuanced allegory for US politics, The Mere Wife reveals truths about our world through a dystopian suburbia in the vein of The Handmaid’s Tale. Headley is a master storyteller with razor-sharp observations. Better Read Than Dead Bookshop [A] poetic, transcendental stunner of a novel! Maria Dahvana Headley’s electric storytelling weaves a dark exploration of how everyone has the potential to become or create monsters. A nuanced allegory for US politics, The Mere Wife reveals truths about our world through a dystopian suburbia … Headley is a master storyteller with razor-sharp observations … one of my favourite reads of 2018 so far. Mischa Parkee, Bookseller at Better Read Than Dead Best-selling American author/editor Maria Dahvana Headley spins the ancient story of monsters and dragons around a gated community populated by the beautiful and entitled … this is more than an old story in new clothes. North and South So: I loved The Mere Wife and I bet lots of other people will too … Everyone should read The Mere Wife. It’s a wonderfully unexpected dark/funny/lyrical/angry retelling of Beowulf; what's not to like? Emily Wilson, translator of The Odyssey Fan-fucking-tastic … this book! Oh, this book! It’s brutal and beautiful and unflinching. Justina Ireland, author of Feral Youth Headley's jabs at suburban smugness are fun … [and her] prose can be stark, lacerating, insightful … The role reversals Headley devises — and the way she adapts an ancient tale into a 21st-century struggle between haves and have-nots, brown-skinned and white, damaged and intact — are largely effective.’ Michael Upchurch, The New York Times Book Review A sly satire of suburbia, wittily detailed and narratively bold … with its roots in ancient legend The Mere Wife] proves especially relevant in this time of heightened fear of the Other. Michael Berry, San Francisco Chronicle Headley's divergences and additions, descriptions of glittering scenery and bloody battles, keep us entranced as those who once gathered round the fire to hear of heroic deeds and shudder at the monsters among us. Kathleen Alcala, The Cascadia Subduction Zone [The Mere Wife] is the story of the fierceness of a mother's love, delivered with a full-throated feminist roar, a highly literary sensibility, and characters who straddle the line between reality and fantasy … It rings with musicality … [Headley's] prose takes no prisoners, and her musings on myth and magic and feminism hit like a welcome punch to the face. Read The Mere Wife, and look forward to her forthcoming translation of Beowulf, which will further shift our understanding of what makes a monster, a hero, a woman. Ardi Alspach, B&N Sci-Fi & Fantasy Blog The Mere Wife shows war from a mother’s perspective; the tragedy of all-encompassing love in a world that inevitably destroys … By centring on the mother’s perspective, Headley tells one of Western literature’s classic tales differently and proves that feminist revisionist writing is essential reading in a changing world. Weekend Australian A rich, full narrative. Good Reading Headley’s heroic prose and vivid imagery offers thought-provoking correlations between ancient themes and recent historical events. Its emphasis on feminist power gives an old tale renewed significance. Reba Leiding, Library Journal The Mere Wife is a boldly conceived work that can stand proudly on the bookshelf next to its inspiration. Paul Di Filippo, Barnes and Noble Review The Mere Wife goes beyond Beowulf to become a narrative that offers a bold look at American suburbia while exploring the power of women in society. Gabino Iglesias, The Rumpus

  16. 4 out of 5

    Taylor Woods

    If this isn't a good representation of how much I loved this book. SO. MANY. GREAT. PARTS!

  17. 4 out of 5

    Becky

    THIS IS A PERFECT BOOK. Rest of the review pending.

  18. 4 out of 5

    elizabeth

    Lucky to have read a galley of this incisive retelling of Beowulf. Riffing on a mistranslation from the Old English that deems Grendel's mother a monster rather than a warrior, The Mere Wife sets Beowulf in modern American suburbs, at the foot of a wild mountain. Headley's fierce lyricism tells a tough story of the effects of war, patriarchy, and racism on the American psyche. The literal whiteness of the snowy mountain outside of aggressively manicured Herot Hall proves far less dangerous than Lucky to have read a galley of this incisive retelling of Beowulf. Riffing on a mistranslation from the Old English that deems Grendel's mother a monster rather than a warrior, The Mere Wife sets Beowulf in modern American suburbs, at the foot of a wild mountain. Headley's fierce lyricism tells a tough story of the effects of war, patriarchy, and racism on the American psyche. The literal whiteness of the snowy mountain outside of aggressively manicured Herot Hall proves far less dangerous than those hellbent on preserving their pristine way of life to the exclusion of those they deem monstrously other. With battles and poetry and a magnificent chorus of coiffed and toned suburban mothers and land that speaks back in startling shifts of voice, Headley keeps the epic scale of an old story in a thoroughly modern imagining. I don't think I offer any spoilers when I say Headley spins this ancient story around to show us the dragons still within us, and the monsters we become.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Jaime

    Strange and powerful and luminous, all at once. My brain is trying to wrap itself around this tornado of a book, my heart blown apart by the prose.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Nadine

    4 1/2 stars. This is a war novel that takes place in the wealthy planned community of Herot Hall, with a tiny rebel band surviving in the mountain (mother Dana and son Gren), massive occupying forces in the valley (the Herot Hall dwellers), generals plotting strategy in the field (perfectly preserved wealthy matriarchs in pearls and designer handbags), and around it all, a Greek chorus speaking for the mere, the mountain and the souls who’ve lived and died there. There are soldiers who go mad wi 4 1/2 stars. This is a war novel that takes place in the wealthy planned community of Herot Hall, with a tiny rebel band surviving in the mountain (mother Dana and son Gren), massive occupying forces in the valley (the Herot Hall dwellers), generals plotting strategy in the field (perfectly preserved wealthy matriarchs in pearls and designer handbags), and around it all, a Greek chorus speaking for the mere, the mountain and the souls who’ve lived and died there. There are soldiers who go mad with the guilt of blood on their hands, and monsters real and imagined. And love and greed and gore and designer kitchens and trains. It is also a loose retelling of Beowulf, with women running the show, though the men don’t realize it. It may have gone a little over the top at the end, but I followed it right over, so I’m not complaining. Headley has some clever little structural tricks that kept me entertained. Also loved the short chapter narrated by the search and rescue dogs. It's exactly what I imagine would be in their heads!

  21. 5 out of 5

    Stefanie

    A modern retelling of the Beowulf story, this one is set in the suburbs at the foot of a mountain that has a mere and an old buried train station. It is a story filled with monsters and looks at various ways we make monsters and are made into monsters by ourselves, by others, by society, by war. The writing is fantastic and I was not surprised to read in the acknowledgements that China Mieville is a friend of Headley's and read and commented on several of her drafts. A thoughtful and thought-pro A modern retelling of the Beowulf story, this one is set in the suburbs at the foot of a mountain that has a mere and an old buried train station. It is a story filled with monsters and looks at various ways we make monsters and are made into monsters by ourselves, by others, by society, by war. The writing is fantastic and I was not surprised to read in the acknowledgements that China Mieville is a friend of Headley's and read and commented on several of her drafts. A thoughtful and thought-provoking book.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer

    This is far from a cozy read but this a seriously cozy blanket. It took me about 48 hours to finish this fantastically dark and beautifully-written modern day, suburban tale inspired by Beowulf. No need to have read or even be familiar with the original text, though! This story captivated me and it's been almost 20 years since I read Beowulf in my high school AP English class. . I could go on about this novel; Headley writes about PTSD, motherhood, and the darker aspects of the human condition exp This is far from a cozy read but this a seriously cozy blanket. It took me about 48 hours to finish this fantastically dark and beautifully-written modern day, suburban tale inspired by Beowulf. No need to have read or even be familiar with the original text, though! This story captivated me and it's been almost 20 years since I read Beowulf in my high school AP English class. . I could go on about this novel; Headley writes about PTSD, motherhood, and the darker aspects of the human condition expertly.

  23. 5 out of 5

    CJ Leede

    Exquisite, visceral, primordial, sexy, frightening, un-put-down-able. I am now a die-hard fan for life. Just do yourselves a favor and read it! Just, wow.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Maureen Tumenas

    I know that this is touted as a modern retelling of Beowulf, but aside from some sections, I did not find that it really followed a plot line- aside from the general: mothers rescuing children, warriors and the society they are protecting. The female characters with their flashbacks were both unsympathetic characters although I tried to like Dana. I simply couldn't understand why she was living there with her son. Did not appeal to me, picked it up, put it down, over and over, until I forced myse I know that this is touted as a modern retelling of Beowulf, but aside from some sections, I did not find that it really followed a plot line- aside from the general: mothers rescuing children, warriors and the society they are protecting. The female characters with their flashbacks were both unsympathetic characters although I tried to like Dana. I simply couldn't understand why she was living there with her son. Did not appeal to me, picked it up, put it down, over and over, until I forced myself to finally finish it.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Janelle Bailey

    42: The Mere Wife by Maria Dahvana Headley...you KNOW how rarely I give a book a 5! This book is brand new and completely amazing. It's got everything that only the best literature does (boy, would I love to teach it!), most concisely assessed by me as having numerous, valuable layers. It completely plays out a modernized telling of Beowulf, the oldest poem, and one I enjoyed teaching in a number of different courses. It plays with words wonderfully and in a number of different ways. Its figures 42: The Mere Wife by Maria Dahvana Headley...you KNOW how rarely I give a book a 5! This book is brand new and completely amazing. It's got everything that only the best literature does (boy, would I love to teach it!), most concisely assessed by me as having numerous, valuable layers. It completely plays out a modernized telling of Beowulf, the oldest poem, and one I enjoyed teaching in a number of different courses. It plays with words wonderfully and in a number of different ways. Its figures are at times silly and at other times completely complex. The organization of chapters and the multiple narrative perspectives only add to the analyzable. This is most definitely the kind of book you want to read...and then read again...and discuss. Thanks for the heads-up, Sarah F!

  26. 5 out of 5

    Lisa Beaulieu

    What the fuck just happened? That's all I can think as I turn the last page. It cannot have been written without divine intervention. Stars and ratings, meaning nothing. This is a thunderstorm, a hurricane, the bottom of the ocean and the end of a galaxy. Just read it.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Olivia

    Holy. Shit.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Chris Roberts

    Suburbia builder of tract homes, beware the discerning eye, the proximity thereof, to your masterpiece of ordinariness. Dear John Cheever, You have lived a K-Mart life, under the suburban sun and moon, you are a soft shell turtle. Sincere, C.R. There is a make-believe disease - PTSD and some very real pills to take, exactly, stub your toe, nightmares, prescription. *THE WHOLE TRASHED WORLD IS STRESSED. Chris Roberts, God Breathtakingly

  29. 5 out of 5

    Kyra Johnson

    Thanks so much to MCD/FSG Books for this breathtaking novel. All opinions are my own. Wow. I adored this book! The Mere Wife is a modern retelling of the epic tale, Beowulf, set in the American suburbs at the foot of a mountain. The protagonist Dana Mills is a shell-shocked veteran and lives in a cave in the mountain with her son Gren. Feasting on wildlife and living off the land, Dana demands that Gren stays on the mountain and avoids human interaction because he is not a normal boy and Dana want Thanks so much to MCD/FSG Books for this breathtaking novel. All opinions are my own. Wow. I adored this book! The Mere Wife is a modern retelling of the epic tale, Beowulf, set in the American suburbs at the foot of a mountain. The protagonist Dana Mills is a shell-shocked veteran and lives in a cave in the mountain with her son Gren. Feasting on wildlife and living off the land, Dana demands that Gren stays on the mountain and avoids human interaction because he is not a normal boy and Dana wants to keep him out of harms way. As Gren grows older, he longs for a friend and spots a boy that lives at the bottom of the mountain in the pristine town of Herot Hall. Roger, Willa and their son Dylan Herot live a life of privilege and luxury at that very house. Despite his mother's wishes, Gren sneaks around to befriend Dylan and they hit it off. Eventually, their parents find out and in a tragic turn of events, their lives are turned upside down. In a fit of rage, Willa Herot enlists officer Ben Woolf to hunt for Dana and Gren. I was pleasantly surprised to find many thought-provoking facets in this retelling. The contrast between the untamed mountain and the polished, gated community of Herot Hall really set the tone for the story. The ancient spirits of the mountain had their own voice and flowing narrative. Headley skillfully executed a feminist approach to the womanhood and female relationships in this story. The women were the ultimate warriors, despite what the men thought. Dana was fierce, strong and willing to risk it all to protect her son. The suburban mothers banded together to use their power in numbers and got shit done, for lack of better words. Willa seemed to have lost her identity somewhere along the way and questioned her own motivations. Headley examines boundaries, prejudice and class between those living in Herot Hall and those living outside in the cities and beyond. This story is a perfect example of the brutal damage that humans can so easily and thoughtlessly inflict upon each other. I was engaged by this book from start to finish and I don't have a bad word to say about it. Headley's language was lyrical and powerful and took hold of me. This book will remind you of Beowulf but it is ultimately so much deeper. You will be thinking twice about who the real monster's and heroes are. This book was unlike anything I've ever read and I look forward to Headley's translation of Beowulf in 2019! You don't have to be familiar with Beowulf to love this story and I highly recommend it for anyone who enjoys reading complex, haunting tales complete with battles and poetic writing.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Ebony Rae

    The Mere Wife... had me on the edge of my seat for the entire two hours it took me to read it. As I am writing this, my rating stars remain unchecked I am honestly still deciding how I feel about it. Lol ... My main impression is that this is a book about survival. How strong the survival instinct is, what our ideas of survival are, how it extends to our loved ones and how it can make someone completely paranoid and out of touch. Both of the Mothers this book revolves around have moments (pages) o The Mere Wife... had me on the edge of my seat for the entire two hours it took me to read it. As I am writing this, my rating stars remain unchecked I am honestly still deciding how I feel about it. Lol ... My main impression is that this is a book about survival. How strong the survival instinct is, what our ideas of survival are, how it extends to our loved ones and how it can make someone completely paranoid and out of touch. Both of the Mothers this book revolves around have moments (pages) of dreamlike delusions which to me, resulted, in large portions of the book in which it was difficult to tell what was ACTUALLY happening. Aside from that there's the over all tone that feels like your constantly teetering on the edge of some disturbing realization... That said, this book reads like a very unsettling (and maybe slightly incomplete at times?) work of art; Interesting to consider. : ) Happy Reading Best Wishes Ebony ;) <3

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