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She Loves You (Yeah, Yeah, Yeah)

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The story of a girl swept up in the heart of 1960s Beatlemania. The year is 1966. The Vietnam War rages overseas, the Beatles have catapulted into stardom, and twelve-year-old Rhode Island native Trudy Mixer is not thrilled with life. Her best friend, Michelle, has decided to become a cheerleader, everyone at school is now calling her Gertrude (her hated real name), and the The story of a girl swept up in the heart of 1960s Beatlemania. The year is 1966. The Vietnam War rages overseas, the Beatles have catapulted into stardom, and twelve-year-old Rhode Island native Trudy Mixer is not thrilled with life. Her best friend, Michelle, has decided to become a cheerleader, everyone at school is now calling her Gertrude (her hated real name), and the gem of her middle school career, the Beatles fan club, has dwindled down to only three other members--the least popular kids at school. And at home, her workaholic father has become even more distant. Determined to regain her social status and prove herself to her father, Trudy looks toward the biggest thing happening worldwide: the Beatles. She is set on seeing their final world tour in Boston at the end of the summer--and meeting her beloved Paul McCartney. So on a hot August day, unknown to their families, Trudy and crew set off on their journey, each of them with soaring hopes for what lies ahead.


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The story of a girl swept up in the heart of 1960s Beatlemania. The year is 1966. The Vietnam War rages overseas, the Beatles have catapulted into stardom, and twelve-year-old Rhode Island native Trudy Mixer is not thrilled with life. Her best friend, Michelle, has decided to become a cheerleader, everyone at school is now calling her Gertrude (her hated real name), and the The story of a girl swept up in the heart of 1960s Beatlemania. The year is 1966. The Vietnam War rages overseas, the Beatles have catapulted into stardom, and twelve-year-old Rhode Island native Trudy Mixer is not thrilled with life. Her best friend, Michelle, has decided to become a cheerleader, everyone at school is now calling her Gertrude (her hated real name), and the gem of her middle school career, the Beatles fan club, has dwindled down to only three other members--the least popular kids at school. And at home, her workaholic father has become even more distant. Determined to regain her social status and prove herself to her father, Trudy looks toward the biggest thing happening worldwide: the Beatles. She is set on seeing their final world tour in Boston at the end of the summer--and meeting her beloved Paul McCartney. So on a hot August day, unknown to their families, Trudy and crew set off on their journey, each of them with soaring hopes for what lies ahead.

30 review for She Loves You (Yeah, Yeah, Yeah)

  1. 5 out of 5

    Kelly Hager

    I am currently enjoying quite a slew of great books. This one is no surprise because everything I've read by Ann Hood has been completely amazing.  This is middlegrade, though (everything else I've read by her has been adult fiction or nonfiction) and I know that's a different skill set.  Can I just say that this book is complete magic? I'm too young to have experienced the Beatles live, but this book was so evocative, I actually felt like I was there. (Should it ever come up on Jeopardy!, John i I am currently enjoying quite a slew of great books. This one is no surprise because everything I've read by Ann Hood has been completely amazing.  This is middlegrade, though (everything else I've read by her has been adult fiction or nonfiction) and I know that's a different skill set.  Can I just say that this book is complete magic? I'm too young to have experienced the Beatles live, but this book was so evocative, I actually felt like I was there. (Should it ever come up on Jeopardy!, John is my favorite Beatle.) There are a lot of other things going on here. Trudy feels like she's losing her best friend (to popular girls) and her father (because she's not interesting enough) and so the quest to see the Beatles in concert and to meet Paul McCartney becomes a bit of magical thinking (if she can make this happen, her life will go back to what she wants it to be---especially where her dad is concerned because this really is the one thing they have in common). Her fellow fan club members have similar hopes.  You don't have to know who the Beatles are to love this book, but I'd be willing to bet that this book will get the Fab Four some new fans. Highly recommended.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Ms. Yingling

    ARC from ALA Midwinter It's 1966, and Trudy Mixer is having a hard time at the end of the school year. Her best friend, Michelle, is morphing into a lipstick wearing, Twiggy haircut sporting cheerleader, her father is so involved in his work that he doesn't spend much time with her, and her Beatles' Fan Blub has gone from being the biggest group in the school to having only four members. Not only that, but a substitute teacher uses her real name, Gertrude, and people start calling her that all th ARC from ALA Midwinter It's 1966, and Trudy Mixer is having a hard time at the end of the school year. Her best friend, Michelle, is morphing into a lipstick wearing, Twiggy haircut sporting cheerleader, her father is so involved in his work that he doesn't spend much time with her, and her Beatles' Fan Blub has gone from being the biggest group in the school to having only four members. Not only that, but a substitute teacher uses her real name, Gertrude, and people start calling her that all the time. There's a brief moment of light-- the Beatles are performing a concert in Boston, not too far from her home. Her father has to travel to Japan on business, but Trudy convinces her mother to drive her, and even gets her to practice, since driving stresses her out. When her mother breaks her leg and has a cumbersome cast on her right foot, Trudy must reassess her strategies. There is a new girl in town, Penelope, who has moved from California and spells of Patchouli, and she claims that she is going to the concert with a high school boy, and they intend to take the bus and then the subway to the concert. Trudy rallies the three remaining members-- Jessica, Nora, and Peter-- and uses the summer to obsess over the Beatles' music and make plans for the concert. As president of the FIRST fan club in Rhode Island, Trudy is sure that the group can manage to meet Paul, and soon finds out that her friends all have their own reasons for wanting to make a personal connection with the Fab Four. Strengths: While there are still students who adore the Beatles (my own daughter included!), I don't think they understand the real impact of the group on popular culture in the 1960s. We have needed this book for a LONG time, and Hood includes so many details about modern day culture that I was definitely transported back to the summer of 1966.Trudy has a typical, middle class suburban lifestyle-- the hard working, quiet father, the Arpege wearing mother who dabbles in reading The Feminine Mystique but still churns out meatloaf, and the bedroom with mint green dotted swiss and a record player. In everlasting middle school (or junior high) fashion, her friends are changing and developing interests that don't match hers. The social issues of the time are worked in very cleverly through the experiences of the other children and include the "hippie" counterculture, the conflict in Vietnam and its effect on the families whose sons were fighting, and the general change in the feeling in the world that is so evident in the evolution of the Beatles' music and wonderfully summed up by this line "Psychedelic was part of the way the world was changing, and it made me feel nervous." (Page 154 of the uncorrected advance proof.) This is a beautifully written and vivid paean to a bygone era that is ingrained in the public consciousness and needs to be explained to younger people. Weaknesses: I was so caught up in the details (Liddle Kiddles! Melamine dishes! White Pages from other cities in the library! Up the Down Staircase!) that I missed the character development in Jessica and Nora, and was a little surprised at Peter's feelings for Trudy at the end of the book. There were a few minor historical errors, but no 12 year old will catch them, and they all involved things that were just a year or two off. What I really think: This transports readers to a very particular time and fully invests them in Trudy's quest to meet Paul McCartney. It is a wish fulfillment novel in the very best sense. I cried at the end, but then I was always a girl who loved George best! Definitely purchasing at least two, if not three, copies. Plus one for my daughter for Christmas!

  3. 5 out of 5

    Cindi

    Review originally posted on my blog : http://utahmomslife.blogspot.com/2018... I didn't know what I was in the mood for, so last night I sat down with a stack of books and the intent to read a few pages of each. I started with She Loves You (Yeah, Yeah, Yeah) by Ann Hood. Before I knew it, I was over halfway finished with this lovely and endearing novel. It's intended audience is middle grade children but this Beatles fan was immediately enraptured. Trudy Mixer is the president of the Robert E. Qu Review originally posted on my blog : http://utahmomslife.blogspot.com/2018... I didn't know what I was in the mood for, so last night I sat down with a stack of books and the intent to read a few pages of each. I started with She Loves You (Yeah, Yeah, Yeah) by Ann Hood. Before I knew it, I was over halfway finished with this lovely and endearing novel. It's intended audience is middle grade children but this Beatles fan was immediately enraptured. Trudy Mixer is the president of the Robert E. Quinn Junior High Fan Club. Until recently it has been the most popular club at the school with 24 members but suddenly the students and Trudy's best friend Michelle are flocking towards Future Cheerleader Club. Now there are only four members of the club, including Trudy. The other three members are the nerdiest, weirdest kids and Trudy is determined to win back her popularity and her best friend. When she hears that the Beatles are coming to Boston in concert, she cooks up a plan to meet Paul McCartney. She Loves You place in 1966 when the world was changing. Stuck in the middle of the upheaval of the Vietnam War, the Hippie movement and Beatlemania, spunky sixth grader Trudy Mixer is dealing with the trauma of junior high. She's an adorable character with about as much charm as most sixth graders. She's been dumped by her best friend who has moved on to newer, cooler friends and more exciting pursuits than writing fan mail to John Lennon. Trudy's love for the Beatles is pure and will be recognized by any who has been a true fan of anything. You're going to cheer for her and her little group of fans. Ann Hood is an excellent writer who strikes just the right note in her newest book for younger audiences. I was fully transported to the 60s even as I recalled my own middle school years in the 1980s. Middle school is middle school is middle school. That is one universal truth. I'm excited to share She Loves You with my middle school aged children when they finally wake up from their summer sleep ins.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Diane Payne

    This is a quick read for adults, especially for those of us who remember watching "The Beatles on The Ed Sullivan Show." For middle school teachers, this could be a fun book to use in the classroom because 1) you get to expose them to The Beatles music; 2) learn about Vietnam War/President Johnson/Lady Bird; 3) discuss friendships/families/feeling left out/ working towards goals; 5) learn how to read bus and subway schedules, and 6) feminism and hippies. Fun book!

  5. 5 out of 5

    Josephine

    This was really cute; I loved it!

  6. 5 out of 5

    FloeticFlo

    "This story on some levels is my story of loving a boy band so so much, and I loved the feeling that I got when reading this book because of it. Exhilarated and nostalgic." Read the full review on Book Nerds Across America: http://www.booknerdsacrossamerica.com....

  7. 4 out of 5

    Janine

    Recently, my kids attended a special kids’ event at our local Barnes and Noble. During this event, a few books were being touted. One of the others, I also actually read and thoroughly enjoyed. The other that caught my attention was “She Loves, Yeah, Yeah, Yeah”. Why? Because it was set in the turbulent 1960s decade. Plus, it also centered around the extremely popular 1960s music group, The Beatles. Specifically my own favorite from The Beatles, Paul McCartney. What can I say? But that I am a suc Recently, my kids attended a special kids’ event at our local Barnes and Noble. During this event, a few books were being touted. One of the others, I also actually read and thoroughly enjoyed. The other that caught my attention was “She Loves, Yeah, Yeah, Yeah”. Why? Because it was set in the turbulent 1960s decade. Plus, it also centered around the extremely popular 1960s music group, The Beatles. Specifically my own favorite from The Beatles, Paul McCartney. What can I say? But that I am a sucker for anything to do with this time in history, as well as The Beatles. So, I bought a copy and couldn’t be happier that I did. While this is a middle grade book, I still definitely found it worthy to read. See the story of The Beatles number one fan and middle school fan club was pure delight. As a former middle school teacher, middle school can be particularly cruel time for many. Trudy is no exception to this. Her once highly attended Beatles Fan Club now only has 3 other members. All of these kids are a bit quirky and definitely not popular. Her once best friend, Michelle dropped her for a group of popular cheerleaders. Trudy’s dad is much too busy with work to enjoy their once shared love of The Beatles. And Trudy’s mom ends up taking a bit of a fall only to be left in a cast for the summer months due to a broken leg. Plus, all the kids at school started referring to her by Gertrude (her given name) instead of Trudy. Therefore what is Trudy to do? Well, she plans to go to the upcoming Beatles concert with her few remaining fan club members. Not only does she want to see The Beatles in concert sing, but she also wants to meet Paul McCartney in person. Her reasoning is simple. She feels that this clandescendant meeting will fix all of her problems. I honestly loved how persistent Trudy was in getting to meet Paul McCartney. Plus her admiration and love for The Beatles shined through even when they released their album, Revolver, which was dubbed by many at the time to be a flop. Plus, the big pay off was the ending. I don’t want to give it away. But let’s just say Trudy gets more than she could have imagined and learns a lesson or two along the way.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Elizabeth

    A sweet middle-grade novel about a girl named Trudy Mixer that has big dreams - and loves The Beatles. I enjoyed this book, which brings the reader back to 1966, a time when the world was changing and uncertain. But the Fab Four made their mark on society, pop culture, and the hearts of many a music lover. This book had characters you'll wish were your middle school friends, and I rooted for a happy ending for all of them.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Mercedes

    This was a great middle grade book! I'm not sure how kids today will identify with it, but at 37 years old, I really enjoyed it. I was born in 1980, so I completely missed Beatle-Mania, however I loved all the references to the 60's, and the author does an amazing job of setting the scene. When you pick up this book, you feel as though you're right there in Warwick, RI in 1966 during one of the worst heat waves since the 40's. Trudy Mixer is in that rough in-between age of 12. Things around her a This was a great middle grade book! I'm not sure how kids today will identify with it, but at 37 years old, I really enjoyed it. I was born in 1980, so I completely missed Beatle-Mania, however I loved all the references to the 60's, and the author does an amazing job of setting the scene. When you pick up this book, you feel as though you're right there in Warwick, RI in 1966 during one of the worst heat waves since the 40's. Trudy Mixer is in that rough in-between age of 12. Things around her are changing at frightening speed...her once best friend is moving on to other things and other friends without her, her father has a new job that keeps him distant and distracted, her favorite teacher has been replaced with a new one who has ruined her life on her very first day and her mother is down for the count for the entire summer. One thing that never changes though, is Trudy's love for the Beatles. Paul, John, Ringo and George are the center of her whole life, and as the President or her schools Beatles Fan Club, Trudy takes her devotion VERY seriously. While I really enjoyed the book, I was not a fan of the ending. I loved the concert experience, but the very end was a little too over-the-top for me. And then, nothing. It ends so abruptly that it's a bit jarring. An epilogue would have been nice. I get why the author did what she did...to continue on or to include an epilogue would have taken the reader away from Trudy's amazing experience on August 18/19, 1966, but I personally like to know what happens to everyone when I finish a book. Jessica's brother, Nora's mother, Michelle and Trudy....how did it all go? Oh well. In the end though, I absolutely recommend this book. Especially for those who lived through Beatle-Mania. As I said, not sure today's kids will really connect with Trudy and her love of the Beatles, but I'm glad I picked this one up.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Sue Seligman

    What an adorable book! I took this book out of the library thinking it would be an adult trip down memory lane during the 1960s when the Beatles ruled the airwaves but the country was in turmoil. What I found is a book geared towards tweens and teens but with so many references of this time period that those of us who grew up during this time period would have a hard time casting it aside. I love the story of Trudy’s struggles with popular cliques and the outcasts, similar to my own back in the What an adorable book! I took this book out of the library thinking it would be an adult trip down memory lane during the 1960s when the Beatles ruled the airwaves but the country was in turmoil. What I found is a book geared towards tweens and teens but with so many references of this time period that those of us who grew up during this time period would have a hard time casting it aside. I love the story of Trudy’s struggles with popular cliques and the outcasts, similar to my own back in the day. The references of tv shows such as The Monroes and other bands Such as the Crykle made me smile with nostalgia. The determination to see a concert and meet the Beatles shows the pluck of four not such close friends who will learn an important lesson about kindness. I think this lesson about acceptance and love is a reason that this book should be an option for reading among tweens and early teens! A fun read!

  11. 5 out of 5

    Jean Moore

    No one does period detail like Anne Hood. Her new children’s-to-adult novel, She Loves You (Yeah, Yeah, Yeah), presents a first-person narrator, plucky middle-schooler, Trudy (teasingly referred to as Gertrude, to her dismay) Mixer, who is steeped in the innocence of the early 60s. The book is a virtual compendium of mid-60s popular culture references from The Ed Sullivan show to the Ronettes to “female” consciousness raising to tuna in cream sauce. While the young protagonist and her Beatles fa No one does period detail like Anne Hood. Her new children’s-to-adult novel, She Loves You (Yeah, Yeah, Yeah), presents a first-person narrator, plucky middle-schooler, Trudy (teasingly referred to as Gertrude, to her dismay) Mixer, who is steeped in the innocence of the early 60s. The book is a virtual compendium of mid-60s popular culture references from The Ed Sullivan show to the Ronettes to “female” consciousness raising to tuna in cream sauce. While the young protagonist and her Beatles fan club sidekicks suffer from the angst of the day, some issues more serious than others, there is a delightful playfulness as these youngsters undertake the mass transit trip from Providence to Boston to hear the mop-headed ones in concert and possibly to meet Trudy’s one true love, Paul.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Robin

    Even though the Beatles invasion happened over 50 years ago (yikes!), I still remember the night they debuted on the Ed Sullivan show and created a firestorm of hysteria among teens, along with derision by many parents ("those haircuts make them look like girls!" was a common phrase in my house). And this sweet and good-hearted book with a nice message brought all of those memories back. A fun book that will have teens finding and downloading music from the Fab Four, and perhaps even becoming fan Even though the Beatles invasion happened over 50 years ago (yikes!), I still remember the night they debuted on the Ed Sullivan show and created a firestorm of hysteria among teens, along with derision by many parents ("those haircuts make them look like girls!" was a common phrase in my house). And this sweet and good-hearted book with a nice message brought all of those memories back. A fun book that will have teens finding and downloading music from the Fab Four, and perhaps even becoming fans of a band that's over 50 years old.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Tatiana

    I don't know what I was expecting, exactly, but She Loves You (Yeah, Yeah, Yeah) exceeded any assumptions I had of what a middle-grade historical novel about a Beatles fan girl would entail. Ann Hood channels a nostalgic atmosphere for 13-year-old Trudy Mixer's life of heading up the Beatles fan club at her junior high and riding out the waves of tween tumult. The 60's was a different world, and yet it also wasn't so different from today. Change is scary, whether it's in the form of hippies or w I don't know what I was expecting, exactly, but She Loves You (Yeah, Yeah, Yeah) exceeded any assumptions I had of what a middle-grade historical novel about a Beatles fan girl would entail. Ann Hood channels a nostalgic atmosphere for 13-year-old Trudy Mixer's life of heading up the Beatles fan club at her junior high and riding out the waves of tween tumult. The 60's was a different world, and yet it also wasn't so different from today. Change is scary, whether it's in the form of hippies or war or best friends. So of course meeting a Beatle would make everything better! I learned to like Trudy, and I loved Peter, Jessica, and Nora. Their own little Fab Four. I wanted for them the ending they received, fairy-tale material as it was. I think this will appeal greatly to those who experienced shockwaves of the British Invasion, but it definitely has charm that transcends that moment in history, if one is willing to give it a go. Oh, and...I like George best, so ha!

  14. 4 out of 5

    MC

    This was okay, but it wasn't as good as I thought it would be. It is NOT one of my favorites. BUT, I would recommend this book to anyone who likes the Beatles. :D

  15. 4 out of 5

    Jenn

    A cute, fun read. Very typical set of characters.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Emily Vrotsos

    This was a lovely story about accepting and embracing change, colored by the purity of adolescent love for the music and lyrics that can shape their young lives. Would highly recommend.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Kate

    Just so sweet and lovely

  18. 5 out of 5

    Donna

    4.5 stars: Although it is marketed and sold as Children's Historical Fiction, I really enjoyed this book and wonder if it will appeal more to people who grew up in the late 1960's and early 1970's than twenty-first century middle schoolers. I found myself transported to 1966 Providence, Rhode Island & into the heart and mind of middle school student, Trudy Mixer. Author Hood gets the details all right , she mentions 'The Galloping Gourmet' and Ed Sullivan tv shows and captures a nostalgia fo 4.5 stars: Although it is marketed and sold as Children's Historical Fiction, I really enjoyed this book and wonder if it will appeal more to people who grew up in the late 1960's and early 1970's than twenty-first century middle schoolers. I found myself transported to 1966 Providence, Rhode Island & into the heart and mind of middle school student, Trudy Mixer. Author Hood gets the details all right , she mentions 'The Galloping Gourmet' and Ed Sullivan tv shows and captures a nostalgia for time long past, with touchstones that conjured up memories of my own. A lovely, sweet story of friendships lost & found, boy bands, music, first love & that awful, yet magical time when you believe that anything is possible, especially with the help of your idol (in the case of this novel, it's Paul McCartney, to whom the book is also dedicated).

  19. 4 out of 5

    Donna

    In this book for middle graders, She Loves You Yeah, Yeah, Yeah by Ann Hood, Trudy Mixer is a junior high student who is growing up in the early 1960’s. Trudy is a huge Beatles fan and starts a fan club at her school. The author gives little tidbits of information about important happenings during that time like President Kennedy’s assassination and the Vietnam War. Trudy decides to go to a Beatles concert and hopes to meet Paul McCartney. Being a retired elementary librarian, I appreciate the a In this book for middle graders, She Loves You Yeah, Yeah, Yeah by Ann Hood, Trudy Mixer is a junior high student who is growing up in the early 1960’s. Trudy is a huge Beatles fan and starts a fan club at her school. The author gives little tidbits of information about important happenings during that time like President Kennedy’s assassination and the Vietnam War. Trudy decides to go to a Beatles concert and hopes to meet Paul McCartney. Being a retired elementary librarian, I appreciate the author wanting to tell about that time in America, however, I really can’t imagine this book appealing to a large audience of middle grade students. It is witty and charming and of course I enjoyed it because I am about the same age as Trudy Mixer! She Love you (Yeah, Yeah, Yeah) by Ann Hood is being published by Penguin Workshop, an imprint of Penguin Young Readers Group. An egalley of this book was made available by the publisher in exchange for a honest review.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Valerie McEnroe

    I'm impressed with this author. I'm a child of the 70s. Though the events were different, the culture was the same and she is spot on with her descriptions. I remember the days, before technology changed everything, when buying a record was a big deal. I remember waiting, very impatiently, for my favorite songs to play on the radio. Remember the monthly mail order music club? Yep. I was a member. Music was everything back then. Trudy is a 6th grader who LOVES The Beatles. She's an encyclopedia o I'm impressed with this author. I'm a child of the 70s. Though the events were different, the culture was the same and she is spot on with her descriptions. I remember the days, before technology changed everything, when buying a record was a big deal. I remember waiting, very impatiently, for my favorite songs to play on the radio. Remember the monthly mail order music club? Yep. I was a member. Music was everything back then. Trudy is a 6th grader who LOVES The Beatles. She's an encyclopedia of Beatles trivia. So she does the only thing an obsessed fan can do and starts a fan club. At first it's the largest club in the school with 24 members, then pre-teen drama happens and she's suddenly unpopular. Her club drops to 4 members, including her. Trudy is devastated. Her best friend has chosen Future Cheerleaders of America and she's left with the nerds. In other news, her dad isn't really a family guy. In her mind, he hardly notices her. The only thing they have in common is The Beatles. When they're set to play in Boston, he buys tickets, but then work happens, and he has to bail. No obsessed fan is going to miss a concert. She has 4 tickets. There's 4 members in the fan club. Attending a Beatles concert with nerds is not ideal, but it's better than going alone, especially when you're going to have to sneak out to get there. Like the highly independent kids of the 60s were, she figures out how to get from Providence to Boston by bus, then to the concert by subway. The story is tightly crafted. I can't find one error in plot or character development. Everything in the story needs to be there and nothing is left out. Early on I was rooting for the 3 unpopular kids, hoping Trudy would buck social norms in favor of real friends. She's a great role model. I hope this is a piece of history that will interest kids. Many teachers at my school require kids to complete genre lists, so I will be pushing this for their historical fiction pick.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Brenda Kahn

    Such a fun read narrated by an endearing character. Trudy's sixth grade year was a bit rough. Her best friend lost interest in her and threw her over for the future cheerleaders club. Her favorite teacher has had emergency surgery and his sub is not only terrible but insists on calling her Gertrude instead of Trudy. Of course, the bully boys jumped right on that! And, her crowning glory, Rhode Island's first Beatle fan club is down to four members! And those members are some of the weirdest kids Such a fun read narrated by an endearing character. Trudy's sixth grade year was a bit rough. Her best friend lost interest in her and threw her over for the future cheerleaders club. Her favorite teacher has had emergency surgery and his sub is not only terrible but insists on calling her Gertrude instead of Trudy. Of course, the bully boys jumped right on that! And, her crowning glory, Rhode Island's first Beatle fan club is down to four members! And those members are some of the weirdest kids in her class. She and her dad share a love of the Beatles but he's been so preoccupied by work that he barely notices her. Trudy has to do something to make the summer memorable and get herself back on her game - like, meeting Paul McCartney. Hood dishes up a taste of the sixties with all its turmoil and conveys just how the British Invasion rocked the world of U.S. teenagers. Changing friendships and middle school seems to stay the same, making the book relatable.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Alissa

    I just couldn't resist picking this one up. I am not a huge Beatles fan, but am familiar with many of their songs (who isn't?) Because I'm not a huge fan I was a little worried that I wouldn't get this book. I was happy that it didn't hinder my enjoyment of the story. I loved the pop-culture and historical references throughout, and when she described her first barbie, zebra-striped swimming suit and all, I had to laugh because I actually own one of those! (Although Trudy did referred to her own I just couldn't resist picking this one up. I am not a huge Beatles fan, but am familiar with many of their songs (who isn't?) Because I'm not a huge fan I was a little worried that I wouldn't get this book. I was happy that it didn't hinder my enjoyment of the story. I loved the pop-culture and historical references throughout, and when she described her first barbie, zebra-striped swimming suit and all, I had to laugh because I actually own one of those! (Although Trudy did referred to her own footwear as flip-flops... I don't know about you, but they were "thongs" when I was young.) It was fun to tag along on Trudy's adventure and her journey of discovery. She went from being so caught up in her own issues to realizing others around her struggle too. Loved that. And the ending was a treat. 2018 Popsugar Reading Challenge: #28 A book with song lyrics in the title

  23. 4 out of 5

    Sarai Davila

    "She Loves You: Yeah Yeah Yeah" is a confection with a lot of heart, despite being the tiniest bit trite, and a lot unbelievable. Set in 1966, "She Loves You..." focuses on the changes that Trudy experiences in early adolescence, while cleverly mirroring them against the backdrop of the changing music scene and how the popularly of The Beatles waxes and wanes and shifts as their sound changes drastically. Trudy struggles with the typical adolescent worries like friendships ending and evolving, a "She Loves You: Yeah Yeah Yeah" is a confection with a lot of heart, despite being the tiniest bit trite, and a lot unbelievable. Set in 1966, "She Loves You..." focuses on the changes that Trudy experiences in early adolescence, while cleverly mirroring them against the backdrop of the changing music scene and how the popularly of The Beatles waxes and wanes and shifts as their sound changes drastically. Trudy struggles with the typical adolescent worries like friendships ending and evolving, a father that doesn't always work to connect with her, and a slew of other things. Her biggest concern, from her point of view, is that she absolutely must see The Beatles in concert. And boy, is it a journey to get there. Trudy's summer involves a lot of lying, scheming, and planning, but it also involves a lot of growth and epiphany that help Trudy realize what's really causing her all this distress and how to cope with her feelings. Hood effectively creates a character who isn't entirely likable at all times, but who does change and grow, and who has a lot of stumbling blocks to overcome on her way. Trudy feels like a typical tween, because she has judgmental thoughts, and she doesn't always appreciate the sacrifices or kindnesses of others. She's not always a generous friend, and she manipulates people consistently, but she does have a good heart under all the mess she makes. Trudy is easy to relate to because her problems, while not massive or life-changing, feel massive and life-changing to the average tween or teenager. And instead of always handling them in a mature way, and passively having negative things happen to her, she fosters some of the negativity in her own life by making poor choices to cope with those issues. Tweens will recognize themselves in her immaturity, however unflattering that may be at times. The nostalgia was strong in this book for me. I did not grow up in the sixties, but my parents did, and their love of music in that era and the impact that the music and culture had on the world was astounding. This book highlights the fun and craziness of Beatlemania, and the cultural shift that was happening at the time. Because of the age recommendation for this book it doesn't delve too deeply into the bigger social issues at the time, but it does touch on the ones that would directly affect the main character, such as feminism. Other than that, the cultural explorations are more based on music, teen culture, and style. Hood does such a great job paralleling the shifts in Trudy's own life with the shifts that The Beatles took musically with Revolver, especially the disquiet caused by that musical change. Trudy is going through the difficult changes that accompany getting older, and The Beatles were making musical choices that weren't entirely popular or welcome. The unease and stress that these simultaneous changes make are well-paired in the book. As Trudy struggles, so do The Beatles to alter the image that rocketed them to fame in the first place. My biggest criticism would be that the stories of the tweens wrapped up a little too quickly and were a little too neat and tidy. Not that they all got resolved, but it felt like they accepted the ending of this story a little bit too peacefully. I wanted a little longer of a resolution to the book, even if that might have made the entire thing drag on a little too much. "She Loves You..." is a sweet, nostalgia-packed historical fiction with a little bit of the magic that only comes with the dreams of tweens.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Meg

    I am a crazy Beatles fan, but even more so, I am a CRAZY Paul McCartney fan! I have a lifesize cardboard cutout of him in my kitchen, I named my cats McCartney and Harrison, and I have a whole tattoo sleeve of Yellow Submarine Paul McCartney. Naturally, I read everything I find about the Beatles and Paul, and I'm always excited to read a fresh take on the 4 lads from Liverpool that I feel like I know so well. With that being said, until this book, I hadn't found many compelling books about the B I am a crazy Beatles fan, but even more so, I am a CRAZY Paul McCartney fan! I have a lifesize cardboard cutout of him in my kitchen, I named my cats McCartney and Harrison, and I have a whole tattoo sleeve of Yellow Submarine Paul McCartney. Naturally, I read everything I find about the Beatles and Paul, and I'm always excited to read a fresh take on the 4 lads from Liverpool that I feel like I know so well. With that being said, until this book, I hadn't found many compelling books about the Beatles for younger readers, and that was an area I felt was lacking. I'm so excited that Ann Hood a) ALSO loves Paul McCartney, and b) wanted to write a piece of historical fiction for kids that revolved around the best band of all time. This book is super cute, fun, and has a lot of trivia gems hidden in plain sight amongst its pages. Trudy Mixer, the main character, is absolutely me in middle school: I was nerdy, misunderstood, and obsessed with the Beatles. The only difference was that the Beatles were LONG since broken up when I was in middle school, so instead of trying to get to one of their concerts, I was trying to make my way to see Paul McCartney with his current line-up in 2005 (spoiler alert: I totally made it to the show, and have since seen him 5 other times.) I loved seeing my childhood self in a character, and I loved imagining that some other little girl, 10 or 20 years younger than me, would see herself in Trudy Mixer too. Besides being cute, this book also makes mentions of important, heavy topics happening in the 196os that are still relevant today: feminism, the Vietnam war, friendship and betrayal, the Kennedy assassination, divorce and lack of parental support, drugs, etc. Ann Hood did a great job of giving this story a historical context, but still kept it from seeming like it was taking place too far in the past. I absolutely recommend this book to any kids OR adults who adore the Beatles, of course. But I also recommend it to any kid who feels like he or she or they don't fit in, or don't belong, or like they don't make sense in the world. Meeting a character who you can see yourself in can make those tough middle school years seem a little brighter. When I was 12 and 13, I buried my nose in Beatles biographies and stories about rock and roll, and it made me feel at home. I hope this book can be the same for some kid out there now. She loves this book, yeah, yeah, yeah!

  25. 4 out of 5

    Marathon County Public Library

    Trudy Mixer feels like she has lost control of her young life. She has been ostracized by her classmates ever since the new substitute teacher called her by her real name—Gertrude—and her best friend has left her for the future cheerleaders group. Practically the most important job of her life is running The Robert E. Quinn Junior High Beatles Fan Club (the original Rhode Island chapter), which now only includes the three dorkiest kids at school. The issue most concerning Trudy, however, is her Trudy Mixer feels like she has lost control of her young life. She has been ostracized by her classmates ever since the new substitute teacher called her by her real name—Gertrude—and her best friend has left her for the future cheerleaders group. Practically the most important job of her life is running The Robert E. Quinn Junior High Beatles Fan Club (the original Rhode Island chapter), which now only includes the three dorkiest kids at school. The issue most concerning Trudy, however, is her relationship with her dad. Trudy and her dad bonded over the Beatles. Since the Beatles first appearance on the Ed Sullivan Show they have been singing along with their songs on the radio and listening to their albums together. But as Beatlemania winds down and the band enters its psychedelic phase, Trudy feels like she is losing him. He works most of the time and reads the paper during family dinners, hardly looking up or listening to her at all. She has to do something that will impress him! Her plan eventually involves going to see the Beatles at Suffolk Downs in Boston with three other members of the fan club and (somehow) meeting Paul McCartney. Not only will this restore her dad to her, she thinks, but it will also get the rest of her life back on track. Each of the other members of the club has his or her own reasons to meet Paul, and looks to this event as a magic solution to their problems. Tension mounts at the book’s climax as readers wonder if the group will ever achieve its goal. Trudy’s lists are one of the features I loved most about this book: “things that have made me excited,” “things I love about Dad,” “things that make me angry.” These are hilarious to read and give readers valuable information about her life. Fans of I Love You, Michael Collins by Lauren Baratz-Logsted will enjoy the similar first-person narrative style and historical backdrop of the 1960's. So get out the popcorn, put on The Beatles Live, and read this book! Elizabeth L. / Marathon County Public Library Find this book in our library catalog.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Jana

    I had the opportunity to read a digital ARC of this middle grade historical fiction novel from NetGalley in exchange for a review. I absolutely loved this book. Because the story takes place in the summer of 1966, readers are able to enjoy the middle school friendship drama surrounding the ups and downs of the upcoming Beatles concert without the characters being glued to their phones and texting each other right and left. Trudy Mixer has been an avid Beatles fan ever since their first appearance I had the opportunity to read a digital ARC of this middle grade historical fiction novel from NetGalley in exchange for a review. I absolutely loved this book. Because the story takes place in the summer of 1966, readers are able to enjoy the middle school friendship drama surrounding the ups and downs of the upcoming Beatles concert without the characters being glued to their phones and texting each other right and left. Trudy Mixer has been an avid Beatles fan ever since their first appearance on The Ed Sullivan show in 1964. From that day forward, she has been the president of her school’s Beatles fan club. It was a popular club in the beginning, but two years later the club’s membership is dwindling. But the Beatles are going to be performing in concert during the summer, and if Trudy can get the chance to meet Paul McCartney, she’s sure she can wind up on top again. Even though the events of this story take place long before today’s tweens were born (in fact this is stuff from their grandparents’ era), the adolescent characterizations and drama is fresh. Best friends growing apart, blooming love interests, family and school stress are ingredients that keep readers engaged. The story has a good message – everyone is going through their own trials and tribulations and good friends will help see each other through their problems. Fans of the Beatles and period stories from the sixties will definitely appreciate the cultural references of this novel. Just for fun, I made a Spotify playlist of all the songs mentioned in this book just so I could enjoy listening to the great music in the same way the characters in the story did. This is a terrific middle grade book, appropriate for kids in grades five and up.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Jentry

    This was such a fun and cute read. I’ve always been a fan of the Beatles, so when I saw this at the library, I immediately wanted to read it. Trudy Mixer is the president of the Beatles Fan Club at her middle school, the most popular club in school… at least, it was, until recently. The numbers have started to dwindle, with even Trudy’s best friend, Michelle, abandoning the club to join the Future Cheerleaders. Trudy is left with the “weirdest” kids at school and she’s not thrilled about it. At h This was such a fun and cute read. I’ve always been a fan of the Beatles, so when I saw this at the library, I immediately wanted to read it. Trudy Mixer is the president of the Beatles Fan Club at her middle school, the most popular club in school… at least, it was, until recently. The numbers have started to dwindle, with even Trudy’s best friend, Michelle, abandoning the club to join the Future Cheerleaders. Trudy is left with the “weirdest” kids at school and she’s not thrilled about it. At home, Trudy and her dad have always bonded over the Beatles. She feels like it’s the only thing they have in common, so when the Beatles announce a concert near them, she’s thrilled when her dad gets 4 tickets for the family and a friend for Trudy to bring along. Of course, everything doesn’t go according to plan. I don’t want to spoil much, so I’ll stop there and just say that this book captures so much of the feelings and fun of being in middle school. I felt like I was right back in my *NSync loving days and wanting to see them in concert so much. The ending was adorable. I cried a bit. (view spoiler)[I loved when all the kids she thought were weirdos ended up sharing their stories and becoming her friends. It helped her to see that you can’t judge a book (or person in this case) by it’s cover, and honestly, kindness is always the best answer. Also, when they met Paul and George, I was just so happy for them. I know that this was fiction, but I like to think Paul and George really would’ve taken the time to be so nice to a bunch of kids. (hide spoiler)] Anyway, yeah, it’s good. I’d definitely recommend it to a friend. :) P.S. My favorite Beatle is probably George, so I kept chuckling when they said that George couldn’t be your favorite Beatle.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Katie

    3.5/5 stars This was an absolutely adorable story about growing up, finding your true friends, and finding your footing as you navigate the early teen years. It was a quick read, but definitely a super fun one. Although it takes place in the mid-1960’s, as someone who went through these issues decades later, it was still an enjoyable read. I don’t think it would be hard to today’s preteens to relate either. While there are some references that definitely are outdated today, the struggles and fear 3.5/5 stars This was an absolutely adorable story about growing up, finding your true friends, and finding your footing as you navigate the early teen years. It was a quick read, but definitely a super fun one. Although it takes place in the mid-1960’s, as someone who went through these issues decades later, it was still an enjoyable read. I don’t think it would be hard to today’s preteens to relate either. While there are some references that definitely are outdated today, the struggles and fears of the characters are timeless (family struggles, parental abandonment, wanting to be seen, etc) If this book had existed when I was a sixth grader (in 1997) I would have been enamored with it. Like the main character, I had an all-encompassing, “must know every detail of his life” crush on Paul McCartney. My biggest dream was that I could go back to the 60’s and experience Beatlemania in its heyday. These characters were able to live out my childhood (and honestly, still my adulthood) dream. While the story was very simple, and the ending quite abrupt, it was extremely well written and would be engaging for the intended middle grade audience. I have a few Beatle fan friends who I will absolutely be recommending this book to for their middle school aged children (and a fun nostalgic read for themselves) Thanks to Netgalley for an eARC in exchange for my honest opinion.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Megan Mann

    Trudy Mixer has been in love with the Beatles since she saw them on The Ed Sullivan show. She’s the president of the Robert E. Quinn Beatles Fan Club, Rhode Island’s first, and her favorite member is Paul McCartney, of course. But then everything changes and Trudy doesn’t feel as great about her life as she once did. The fan club is down to just four members and these aren’t the kind of kids she wants to associate with. But then she finds out that the Beatles-THE BEATLES!-are going on tour and he Trudy Mixer has been in love with the Beatles since she saw them on The Ed Sullivan show. She’s the president of the Robert E. Quinn Beatles Fan Club, Rhode Island’s first, and her favorite member is Paul McCartney, of course. But then everything changes and Trudy doesn’t feel as great about her life as she once did. The fan club is down to just four members and these aren’t the kind of kids she wants to associate with. But then she finds out that the Beatles-THE BEATLES!-are going on tour and her dad got her tickets! Her dad, who only pays attention to her when it comes to the Fab Four. Her dad, who discovers he has to be in Japan for a business meeting on the day of the concert. What’s Trudy going to do? How is she ever going to fix her reputation at school by meeting Paul McCartney if she can’t even get to the concert in Boston? Determination always wins and with the help of the rest of Trudy’s Fab Four, everything might just happen. I absolutely loved this book. I wanted to give it one less star because of the hate for MY favorite Beatle, George Harrison, but it all worked out in the end. It makes me so envious of those who were around for beatlemania and who experienced it. It was a lovely story about friendship and discovering what’s important and knowing that you don’t have to have a picture perfect life for it to be wonderful.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Cindy Mitchell *Kiss the Book*

    She Loves You (Yeah, Yeah, Yeah) by Ann Hood, 252 pages. Penguin Random House, 2018. $17. Language: G (0 swears o 'f'); Mature Content: G; Violence: G. BUYING ADVISORY: EL, MS - ADVISABLE AUDIENCE APPEAL: AVERAGE 6th grader Trudy Mixer is the president of the Robert E. Quinn Beatles Fan Club, the first one in Rhode Island and the most popular after school club . . . for a while. Now the membership of 23 has dwindled to 4. Even Michelle, Trudy's best friend is now attending the Future Cheerleaders She Loves You (Yeah, Yeah, Yeah) by Ann Hood, 252 pages. Penguin Random House, 2018. $17. Language: G (0 swears o 'f'); Mature Content: G; Violence: G. BUYING ADVISORY: EL, MS - ADVISABLE AUDIENCE APPEAL: AVERAGE 6th grader Trudy Mixer is the president of the Robert E. Quinn Beatles Fan Club, the first one in Rhode Island and the most popular after school club . . . for a while. Now the membership of 23 has dwindled to 4. Even Michelle, Trudy's best friend is now attending the Future Cheerleaders Club. When Trudy's dad buys 4 tickets to the Beatles concert in Boston, Trudy begins to make plans to meet Paul McCartney and regain her popularity! But when Trudy's dad goes to Japan on business and her mom breaks her leg and can't drive to Boston, Trudy has to rely on the club members to help make her dreams - and theirs - come true. This story had many layers - it's about the drive to be popular, the changing relationship with your parents, the 60's, growing up, and seeing people in a different way. Everyone has problems, some hide them better than others. There's a little background knowledge necessary to really appreciate the Beatles - song lyrics are quoted but without the tune it just isn't the same. Lisa Librarian https://kissthebook.blogspot.com/2018...

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