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In this debut set in near future NYC—where lives last 300 years and the pursuit of immortality is all-consuming—Lea must choose between her estranged father and her chance to live forever. Lea Kirino is a “Lifer,” which means that a roll of the genetic dice has given her the potential to live forever—if she does everything right. And Lea is an overachiever. She’s a successf In this debut set in near future NYC—where lives last 300 years and the pursuit of immortality is all-consuming—Lea must choose between her estranged father and her chance to live forever. Lea Kirino is a “Lifer,” which means that a roll of the genetic dice has given her the potential to live forever—if she does everything right. And Lea is an overachiever. She’s a successful trader on the New York exchange—where instead of stocks, human organs are now bought and sold—she has a beautiful apartment, and a fiancé who rivals her in genetic perfection. And with the right balance of HealthTech™, rigorous juicing, and low-impact exercise, she might never die. But Lea’s perfect life is turned upside down when she spots her estranged father on a crowded sidewalk. His return marks the beginning of her downfall as she is drawn into his mysterious world of the Suicide Club, a network of powerful individuals and rebels who reject society’s pursuit of immortality, and instead chose to live—and die—on their own terms. In this future world, death is not only taboo; it’s also highly illegal. Soon Lea is forced to choose between a sanitized immortal existence and a short, bittersweet time with a man she has never really known, but who is the only family she has left in the world. Advance Praise for Suicide Club Bustle: 15 New Books You Need To Know Bitch Media: 11 Books Feminists Should Read Book Riot: 10 July New Releases to Put on Hold at the Library Right Now Nylon: Great Books To Read This Summer The Rumpus: What to Read When You've Made it Halfway Through 2018 Gizmodo: New Scifi and Fantasy Books to Add to Your Reading List in July The Millions: Most Anticipated "Fans of modern speculative fiction and readers who love stories that warn us to be careful what we wish for will be enthralled by Heng's highly imaginative debut, which deftly asks 'What does it really mean to be alive?'" - Library Journal (starred) "Refreshingly original" - Book Riot "Heng expertly threads a ribbon of dread through her glittering vistas and gleaming characters...[This is] a complicated and promising debut that spoofs the current health culture craze even as it anticipates its appalling culmination." - Kirkus "Audacious... beautifully paced... How can such a young writer know all these things? Rachel Heng’s first novel is as keen as a sharpened blade. Suicide Club is on the money about where our current obsessions are leading us and yet she makes us care about her characters in deep and old-fashioned ways. It reminded me again and again of Orwell and Huxley. I have the feeling that this is the beginning of a long and illustrious career." - James Magnuson, author of Famous Writers I Have Known "“In exquisitely crafted prose, Rachel Heng gives us a startling look at a version of the world that seems simultaneously wild and plausible. Heng is a bold new talent and a writer to watch.” - Liz Moore, author of Heft and The Unseen World


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In this debut set in near future NYC—where lives last 300 years and the pursuit of immortality is all-consuming—Lea must choose between her estranged father and her chance to live forever. Lea Kirino is a “Lifer,” which means that a roll of the genetic dice has given her the potential to live forever—if she does everything right. And Lea is an overachiever. She’s a successf In this debut set in near future NYC—where lives last 300 years and the pursuit of immortality is all-consuming—Lea must choose between her estranged father and her chance to live forever. Lea Kirino is a “Lifer,” which means that a roll of the genetic dice has given her the potential to live forever—if she does everything right. And Lea is an overachiever. She’s a successful trader on the New York exchange—where instead of stocks, human organs are now bought and sold—she has a beautiful apartment, and a fiancé who rivals her in genetic perfection. And with the right balance of HealthTech™, rigorous juicing, and low-impact exercise, she might never die. But Lea’s perfect life is turned upside down when she spots her estranged father on a crowded sidewalk. His return marks the beginning of her downfall as she is drawn into his mysterious world of the Suicide Club, a network of powerful individuals and rebels who reject society’s pursuit of immortality, and instead chose to live—and die—on their own terms. In this future world, death is not only taboo; it’s also highly illegal. Soon Lea is forced to choose between a sanitized immortal existence and a short, bittersweet time with a man she has never really known, but who is the only family she has left in the world. Advance Praise for Suicide Club Bustle: 15 New Books You Need To Know Bitch Media: 11 Books Feminists Should Read Book Riot: 10 July New Releases to Put on Hold at the Library Right Now Nylon: Great Books To Read This Summer The Rumpus: What to Read When You've Made it Halfway Through 2018 Gizmodo: New Scifi and Fantasy Books to Add to Your Reading List in July The Millions: Most Anticipated "Fans of modern speculative fiction and readers who love stories that warn us to be careful what we wish for will be enthralled by Heng's highly imaginative debut, which deftly asks 'What does it really mean to be alive?'" - Library Journal (starred) "Refreshingly original" - Book Riot "Heng expertly threads a ribbon of dread through her glittering vistas and gleaming characters...[This is] a complicated and promising debut that spoofs the current health culture craze even as it anticipates its appalling culmination." - Kirkus "Audacious... beautifully paced... How can such a young writer know all these things? Rachel Heng’s first novel is as keen as a sharpened blade. Suicide Club is on the money about where our current obsessions are leading us and yet she makes us care about her characters in deep and old-fashioned ways. It reminded me again and again of Orwell and Huxley. I have the feeling that this is the beginning of a long and illustrious career." - James Magnuson, author of Famous Writers I Have Known "“In exquisitely crafted prose, Rachel Heng gives us a startling look at a version of the world that seems simultaneously wild and plausible. Heng is a bold new talent and a writer to watch.” - Liz Moore, author of Heft and The Unseen World

30 review for Suicide Club

  1. 5 out of 5

    Navidad Thelamour

    Everything started going wrong after the Second Wave…They’d had the lifespan tests and predictive treatments for decades…but this was something different. The Second Wave, it was dubbed, when a whole raft of new Medtech measures were approved for mass distribution: first-generation SmartBloodTM, an early prototype of what would later become DiamondSkinTM, the first truly functional replacements. And with the new technologies, a whole host of new Directives, aimed at keeping the Ministry’s bigges Everything started going wrong after the Second Wave…They’d had the lifespan tests and predictive treatments for decades…but this was something different. The Second Wave, it was dubbed, when a whole raft of new Medtech measures were approved for mass distribution: first-generation SmartBloodTM, an early prototype of what would later become DiamondSkinTM, the first truly functional replacements. And with the new technologies, a whole host of new Directives, aimed at keeping the Ministry’s biggest investments—lifers—safe and healthy. The Second Wave. There would be immortals by the Third. Rachel Heng’s Suicide Club reimagines a near-future America as a place where medical advancements have made immortality possible and where class lines are now redrawn by a new form of classism and ageism: the estimated length of your lifespan. Here, people are separated into groups, “lifers” and “sub-100s,” those who have the potential to live forever and those who do not. It’s a fresh and unique way to envision a new version of a system that we’re already so familiar with and to see it play out in a futurist narrative, but this novel fell flat for me in more ways than one. Lea Kirino is a “lifer” who lives life by the rules. She maintains an ultra-healthy lifestyle to upkeep her biological upgrades, has a job she’s doing well at (trading organs on a new version of Wall Street), and has the perfect lifer fiancé. But, when she sees her father, who disappeared nearly ninety years before, her entire world is turned upside down, as he unwittingly leads her to the Suicide Club—a group of individuals intent on living and dying by their own rules. The problem with this storyline, I must first point out, is that (view spoiler)[the Suicide Club doesn’t even make an appearance until around the halfway mark of this novel, not to mention Lea doesn’t get “entangled” with them until nearly three-fourths of the way through! Really, this narrative is not centered around her “involvement” with the Suicide Club until after you wade through a couple hundred pages of fluffy writing that goes nowhere and describes nothing and her own internal struggle about her situation (troubles at work, being placed on the observation list when the government thinks she’s at risk for trying to kill herself and deciding if she really wants to be with that perfect lifer fiancé of 20 years). (hide spoiler)] Sorry lol most of that was spoiler! This is literary, character-driven fiction, sure, but the characters didn't drive much of anything. Heng’s Suicide Club offers up beautiful imagery, but it failed to move the story along. There are few things worse to a reader than pointless narrative that takes up space on the page simply for the sake of being pretty. I don’t know about you, but I like my narratives like I like my stilettos: pretty but still functional. But here the purple prose brimmed the pages, fluffed up like 80s hair, describing nothing that resonated or left a lasting impact. All the space of written nothingness could’ve been used to progress the actual plot. Such a wasted opportunity on the part of the author is such a source of ennui for me. I also found all the characters in Suicide Club to be uninteresting and dull in that drained-of-color sort of way. I regularly confused the two female protagonists in my mind, because neither of their stories grabbed me and they both seemed overwhelmed by a kind of neurosis about their circumstances rather than actively trying to do something about it for much of the novel. They blended together in my mind because I wasn’t interested enough to notice or appreciate the subtle nuances of character differentiation between them—or because they hadn’t been effectively imagined and presented on the page. Either way, Suicide Club did not live up to my expectations, a real shame, because it was my first foray into anything resembling Sci-Fi in quite a long while. 3 stars *** **I received an advance-read copy of this book from the publisher, Henry Holt and Co., via Netgalley in exchange for an honest review.** FOLLOW ME AT: The Navi Review Blog | Twitter | Instagram

  2. 4 out of 5

    Hannah

    This book has such a brilliant premise: in this future, immortality is within grasp, but only for those 'deserving' and as such suicide is illegal, anything that might be construed as bad for your health is illegal in fact. I found this idea of preservation of life being the most important thing even before individual happiness and fulfillment so very very brilliant. But I struggled with the execution to no end. I did think that the world Rachel Heng has created here is interesting and developed This book has such a brilliant premise: in this future, immortality is within grasp, but only for those 'deserving' and as such suicide is illegal, anything that might be construed as bad for your health is illegal in fact. I found this idea of preservation of life being the most important thing even before individual happiness and fulfillment so very very brilliant. But I struggled with the execution to no end. I did think that the world Rachel Heng has created here is interesting and developed in such a way that it never felt info-dumpy. But once you start pulling at the threads it does not really make sense. Innovation has led to a world where organs are augmented, skin can be built to be near indestructible, and science has found out the best ways to life long and healthy lives - but at the same time there are people who will not receive those treatments and it never did become clear to me how that works - I would have liked to have this dichotomy explored more: how is decided whose life if worthy enough to make their suicide illegal? There are infinite possibilities to make this a strong indictment on our current society and I would have loved the book more for it. There were other things that did not make sense for me: it never becomes clear how much in the future we are and as such I did not buy the fundamental changes in education that have occurred. It is a plot point that only those who have long life-spans can become medical doctors because the education takes 40 years - and I don't buy that. Why would anybody have to study for 40 years to be a good doctor? I don't think education would change this fundamentally. It irked me especially because I think another explanation would have worked far better: medical degrees are expensive, amongst the most expensive in fact (when considering how much a single student costs universities), so why not make the exclusion of people with shorter life spans about this? My biggest issue, by far, was the main character, Lea. I found her to be less than convincing and unpleasant to spend time with. She is 100 years old and even if that is young in the scheme of her potential life span she is still more than three times as old as I am but she felt like she was 20, tops. I did not get her and the weird back story she had did not work for me either. She never felt her age and never felt like a person. I had this whole elaborate theory in fact that she might actually not be human because this would be the only way her behaviour makes any sense. Also, a petty problem I had with her: she kept sweating behind her knees whenever she was uncomfortable and if that doesn't scream 'weirdly programmed robot' then I don't know (I am sorry if I am the weird one and everybody is in fact sweating behind their knees). The second main character, Anja, was so much more interesting and if the book had been told from her perspective I would have enjoyed it a whole lot more. Her mother was one of those whose bodies were used to test new procedures and now her heart keeps going even though she is brain-dead but she is not allowed to die because life is precious even though she might be stuck and suffering. This is such a creepy, brilliant concept that I would have loved to have seen explored more. But we spend so much more time with Lea than with Anja that this could not save the book for me. So yes, I struggled with this, and I am super disappointed because the bones of this story are so brilliant. I received an arc of this book courtesy of NetGalley and Hodder & Stoughton in exchange for an honest review.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Lou

    If you could live forever . . . would you? Oh man! This premise is such a fascinating one and makes an incredible story. It also raises some provocative questions about the human race, life, death and immortality. I always love it when an author is clever and creative enough to incorporate deeper topics into the narrative. I appreciate that sort of storyline - the ones that allow the exploration of big questions. I salute you for this brilliance, Ms Heng! "Suicide Club" is a science fiction novel If you could live forever . . . would you? Oh man! This premise is such a fascinating one and makes an incredible story. It also raises some provocative questions about the human race, life, death and immortality. I always love it when an author is clever and creative enough to incorporate deeper topics into the narrative. I appreciate that sort of storyline - the ones that allow the exploration of big questions. I salute you for this brilliance, Ms Heng! "Suicide Club" is a science fiction novel that is set in near-future USA. The population is in decline so to combat this people are strongly encouraged to live a super-healthy lifestyle and to get various different body enhancements and replacements. Those lucky enough to do these things are often able to live for over one-hundred years and are known as lifers. But those who aren't as fortunate live for under one-hundred years. As a result, they are classed and treated as second-class citizens and live and die just as us mortals do. I think we can all agree that the concept is an intriguing one! I knew after reading the synopsis for the first time that I had to get my hands on a copy by whatever-means-necessary. The story follows two female characters through their deeply contrasting lives - Lea, a lifer, seems to have it all - A great job, a fiancee, and tries to live her life as close to perfection as possible - in order to do so she consults the governments directives. Then there's Anja, a classical violinist and who's mother is at death's door. The contrast between the two main characters/protagonists is great and Heng is adept at developing her characters distinctive personalities. As the book progresses you get to know them both well. We learn about Lea and Anja's past experiences as they are relevant to the story that is being told here. Although the characters are a vital part of the book, I found that "Suicide Club" was definitely more concept-driven than anything else. I don't mind this and I don't blame Heng for writing it this way as the concept is such a magnetic one. As for the characters, they are all pretty unlikable in nature but I didn't mind that as it fit with the conceptual aspect of the book extremely well. The pace of the book is fairly pedestrian and although this is the case throughout, there is plenty of intrigue to keep you reading and turning those pages right up until the finale. On the whole, I found it quite unpredictable which very much appealed to me. I was also pleasantly surprised that the writing was rather beautiful - Heng has a lovely style and I would definitely dive into another of her titles in the future. I don't think that this is touted as being part of a series but if that were the case I would have enjoyed the story continuing and developing further. All in all, this is a well-executed and beautifully told story that I found pleasant to read. Maybe not as much as I would've liked but it was a great read nonetheless. What let it down a little was that it lacked the excitement necessary to make it unforgettable, I honestly don't know if it's likely i'll remember this book in a couple of months time. A slow-burning dystopian future that seems all too real (which is scary). Many thanks to Sceptre for an ARC. I was not required to post a review and all thoughts and opinions expressed are my own.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Rachel

    Suicide Club is a book full of brilliant concepts that never develop into a convincing or engaging narrative. It's a speculative novel set in a near-future New York society in which death is illegal and the pursuit of immortality is all-consuming. 100-year-old Lea Kirino is a model citizen; she has a high-level job on the New York exchange, which now deals in trading human organs, she has a genetically beautiful fiancé, and she's being considered for a promotion. But things change for Lea when s Suicide Club is a book full of brilliant concepts that never develop into a convincing or engaging narrative. It's a speculative novel set in a near-future New York society in which death is illegal and the pursuit of immortality is all-consuming. 100-year-old Lea Kirino is a model citizen; she has a high-level job on the New York exchange, which now deals in trading human organs, she has a genetically beautiful fiancé, and she's being considered for a promotion. But things change for Lea when she spots her estranged, fugitive father for the first time in 88 years, and she comes in contact with a group called the Suicide Club, which advocates for the right for everyone to live and die on their own terms. So it pretty much goes without saying that this is a fantastic premise; where Suicide Club falls apart is in the execution. It starts out on a promising enough note - the worldbuilding at first seems impressive, and Rachel Heng does a good job of integrating her new terminology into the narrative so that it doesn't overwhelm. It's not until you get a decent amount of the way in that numerous holes begin to develop - and it's not so much in the nitty-gritty details as it is in the overarching concept. If society is still comprised of so many "sub-100s" (people with a 'normal' lifespan), how has death become such a cultural taboo? And why don't these groups revolt against those in power to gain access to their technology? Why is Lea so closely monitored for a supposed suicide attempt after she's hit by a car; does no one ever have a genuine accident in this society? In some ways this reminded me of Felicia Yap's Yesterday, another underwhelming speculative novel whose premise falls to pieces if you look too closely. But the biggest problem with this book was the protagonist, Lea. I don't even know where to begin. I was sort of buddy reading this with my friend Hannah, who at one point said that the only logical explanation she would accept for Lea's behavior was if she were revealed to be an alien at the end of the book. Spoiler alert: she isn't. But I think that just about sums it up. Even though Lea has a lifespan of 200-300 years (so she's technically only middle aged), she's still 100-years-old, so you'd think we'd see some wisdom and life experience occasionally reflected in her behavior. Instead, she is the world's most wooden, immature, simple-minded character, who makes the most incomprehensible decisions and shows absolutely zero critical thinking skills. This would be convincing characterization for an 11-year-old girl; not a 100-year-old New York businesswoman. Her backstory too is laughably incongruous with her characterization, and her character development is hackneyed and unrealistic. Despite the questionable worldbuilding and positively dull narrative, I think this book could have been saved if we'd been focusing on someone other than Lea. Which brings my to my next point, which is that we follow another character for a few chapters, Anja, a Swedish immigrant living in New York with her mother who is being kept alive in a vegetative state. Anja is vulnerable, complex, sympathetic - everything I hoped Lea would be - and it makes no sense to me why we follow Lea's journey so closely at the expense of Anja's. The split between their chapters is probably 70/30 in Lea's favor, which makes me wonder how Lea can come across as so under-developed when she has more than twice the narrative that Anja has. So all in all, a disappointment. But it's worth noting that this is a debut novel, and a rather ambitious one at that. The writing itself was solid, and again, the premise was brilliant, so I think Rachel Heng shows promise. I'll be interested to see where she goes from here - though hopefully it's somewhere with a more convincing and sympathetic protagonist. Thank you to Netgalley, Henry Holt, and Rachel Heng for the advanced copy provided in exchange for an honest review.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Tori (InToriLex)

    Content Warning: Animal Death, Violence, Graphic Internal  Body Descriptions Living forever in a future society that helps restore your body sounds like a utopia. But in this future world people have to meet certain standards to be given the treatments they need to love forever. This book builds character development flawlessly. I was rooting for the main character Lea despite some of her very unlikable traits. Lea is a lifer who at the age of 100 is trying to extend her life and hopefully be Content Warning: Animal Death, Violence, Graphic Internal  Body Descriptions Living forever in a future society that helps restore your body sounds like a utopia. But in this future world people have to meet certain standards to be given the treatments they need to love forever. This book builds character development flawlessly. I was rooting for the main character Lea despite some of her very unlikable traits. Lea is a lifer who at the age of 100 is trying to extend her life and hopefully be apart of The Third Wave that will begin making people immortal. A wrench is thrown into her world when her estranged father Kaito comes back into her life. The book is a character study of how Lea and Kaito come to terms with their shared past and choices they make for the future. The Suicide Club that Lea and Kaito find themselves caught up in are a group of people who are against being unable to choose when and how to die. In the club we meet characters who shun technology gone wrong when a person doesn't receive the right treatments their body may be kept alive for decades beyond when they are brain dead. The world building could have been better, but while reading I intimately got to witness what love, regret, and freedom mean in this future world. I was excited to keep reading and interested in the surprising ways this society maintained control. [image error] There is a cost to everything. This book examines if giving up unhealthy habits and creative pursuits  you love is worth immortality. There were some graphic descriptions of how a body can live healthily past 100, but nothing drawn out. Lea spends the book piecing herself together after realizing the hard choices she made in life. What kind of life can you make in a world where music, art and sugar are banned? I enjoyed this book and am happy it gave me so much to ponder about mortality, family and technology. Recommended for readers who: - want to get sucked into great storytelling - enjoy character study dystopia's - want to think deeply about the consequences future technology can have on humanity

  6. 4 out of 5

    Karla Strand

    See my complete review on my site. Would you want to live forever? In her debut novel Suicide Club, Rachel Heng reaffirms the notion of “be careful what you wish for” and challenges her readers to reflect upon the price they would pay for immortality. We live in a world where the quest for long life is a multimillion dollar industry. In Heng’s near future setting, people live for hundreds of years. But at what cost? In this engaging story, Lea Kirino is a successful woman with the potential to live See my complete review on my site. Would you want to live forever? In her debut novel Suicide Club, Rachel Heng reaffirms the notion of “be careful what you wish for” and challenges her readers to reflect upon the price they would pay for immortality. We live in a world where the quest for long life is a multimillion dollar industry. In Heng’s near future setting, people live for hundreds of years. But at what cost? In this engaging story, Lea Kirino is a successful woman with the potential to live forever. By all accounts, she has a profitable career, a loving relationship, a comfortable apartment. Lea follows all of the suggested guidelines for nutrition (juicing), exercise (low impact, including no running), and avoiding stress (even too much smiling causes unwanted wrinkles). Then one day, she sees her estranged father on the street and it changes everything. Lea begins to question being a “lifer” as she is confronted by the divergent and illegal ideas of her father and the mysterious Suicide Club... Suicide Club is a thought-provoking novel perfect for readers who like dystopian or speculative fiction that makes you think. I was both entertained and intrigued by the book; it held my interest throughout. With characters you will relate to and a story that will draw you in, Suicide Club is one of the strongest debuts of the year.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Janelle

    Many thanks to Henry Holt Books for providing my free copy! I’m going to say right up front that I thoroughly enjoyed this debut novel. It is a slow burn with an original premise and lovely writing. In a world where we all strive to look younger and more beautiful, this book almost mocks that but in a very intelligent way. Lea Kirino is considered a lifer, which means she can potentially live forever. She works in a career in which she helps her clients in the organ trade business through the New Many thanks to Henry Holt Books for providing my free copy! I’m going to say right up front that I thoroughly enjoyed this debut novel. It is a slow burn with an original premise and lovely writing. In a world where we all strive to look younger and more beautiful, this book almost mocks that but in a very intelligent way. Lea Kirino is considered a lifer, which means she can potentially live forever. She works in a career in which she helps her clients in the organ trade business through the New York exchange. She and her fiancé, Todd, are genetically elite and as long as they engage in organ replacements, various technological enhancements, exercise, and proper nutrition, their potential to live forever is possible. However, all of this is in peril after Lea runs into her estranged father and he introduces her to the SUICIDE CLUB. It’s a group that is against this notion of immortality and wants to live and die on their own terms. Does Lea want to shatter her chance at immortality? I finished this book weeks ago and I cannot get it out of my head. The narrators, Lea and Anja, are two strong women with very distinct voices that I love. They are each searching for their own idea of quality of life and the meaning behind it. The concept of immortality is so fascinating, and the realistic, detailed dystopian future that Heng creates is seems entirely plausible. For instance, instead of the New York Stock Exchange people are similarly trading human organs. The idea of death is forbidden - the notion that looking at art or listening to music is taboo is unimaginable but makes total sense if you’re serious about a regimented, long life. This book begs the question is this life of immortality worth the sacrifices you need to make? This beautiful book is thought-provoking and really makes you consider whether these type of science and medical advancements would be ideal for the future. The idea of genetically engineered humans walking the earth is a real brain teaser and a lot of fun to ponder. My only critique is wanting more: more world building, expansion on the suicide cult, and on the bionic aspect. But I’m in love with this book anyway.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Dianne

    Of course we all want to live as long as we can, being as healthy as we can and able to enjoy our time on Earth. What if science and medicine in the future could extend your life for hundreds of years? Would it be worth losing your soul, your privacy and your individuality in the quest to live longer? Are you really living if “defective” body parts can be replaced, you need constant “tweaking” and even the thought of breaking a sweat could be “damaging?” What if you decided you wanted to end you Of course we all want to live as long as we can, being as healthy as we can and able to enjoy our time on Earth. What if science and medicine in the future could extend your life for hundreds of years? Would it be worth losing your soul, your privacy and your individuality in the quest to live longer? Are you really living if “defective” body parts can be replaced, you need constant “tweaking” and even the thought of breaking a sweat could be “damaging?” What if you decided you wanted to end your life, on your terms, and it isn’t allowed? Rachel Heng’s SUICIDE CLUB is a dark and gritty tale of a dystopian future world where genetic perfection is the ideal, but the loss of freedom of choice is brutal, because one never knows who is watching, who might hear and who may turn you in as imperfect. Lea will have to choose between merely existing, potentially forever or learning how to experience life with all of its warts, darkness and real joys. Will she choose life on her own terms or will she become a sheep in the masses? Emotionally dark and heavy, sometimes dragging along, I have to say, it was the ending that made the book for me! It was beautiful. I received a complimentary ARC edition from Henry Holt & Co. Publisher: Henry Holt and Co. (July 10, 2018) Publication Date: July 10, 2018 Genre: Scifi | Dystopian Print Length: 352 pages Available from: Amazon | Barnes & Noble  For Reviews, Giveaways, Fabulous Book News, follow: http://tometender.blogspot.com

  9. 4 out of 5

    Faith

    I received this ARC from Henry Holt and Company in exchange for an honest review. This does not affect my opinion of this book in any way. I don't know if I really like this book or not. I definitely don't hate it, but I can't say I particularly liked it. Let's discuss. Obligatory Summary Lea Kirino is a high society lifer on the path to immortality and success when a ghost from her past in the form of her long lost father shows up and ruins her chances. He disappeared 80 years ago when she was a I received this ARC from Henry Holt and Company in exchange for an honest review. This does not affect my opinion of this book in any way. I don't know if I really like this book or not. I definitely don't hate it, but I can't say I particularly liked it. Let's discuss. Obligatory Summary Lea Kirino is a high society lifer on the path to immortality and success when a ghost from her past in the form of her long lost father shows up and ruins her chances. He disappeared 80 years ago when she was a child, and now seems to have a lot of secrets, one of which is the Suicide Club, a secret underground organization of influential people who believe in living life to the fullest and dying when and how they choose. As Lea learns to accept her past, she must figure out where her allegiances lie—with her father and the antisanct Suicide Club, or with the Ministry and all it's mundane regulations. On the other side of this story, we have Anja, whose mother is trapped in a man-made shell of machinery that will live far longer than she has—a portable life support machine. She is intricately and deeply connected to the Suicide Club. My Thoughts Okay, this premise sounds interesting enough, doesn't it? It sounds like a journey through the meaning of life and death and politics. But it isn't. Not really. The big problem—the main problem—with this book is that it is boring. It wasn't predictable, per say, but only because I couldn't really make sense of the characters' motivations. The why's behind their actions. They did whatever Heng wanted them to do, and a lot of the time, it didn't mesh with the world she created. The world was really good, though, with a great atmosphere for the most part. Because of that, the message of the book didn't really come across. Was it about living your life to the fullest? I think so, but I can't really be sure. Was it an advocate for informed suicide? For assisted suicide? A commentary on the stock market? On the nonsensical trends of high society socialites? A case study on the family? I really can't say. Beyond all this, it was boring. The plot didn't really start until half way through, and there were several loose threads, which is bad, considering that this is a standalone. It felt like a chore to read this. It took me almost two months to read and it's only 335 pages. Also, that cover is butt ugly and misleading genre-wise like whoever designed that needs to be fired. (Note: it was Meryl Sussman Levavi)

  10. 4 out of 5

    Blair

    Imagine a future in which death is close to being eradicated. At birth, everyone is allocated a number which determines whether or not they will be a ‘lifer’, a person who will live for hundreds of years with the aid of surgical enhancements and advanced biological technology. Those with a natural lifespan – ‘sub-100s’ – are effectively an underclass, relegated to the outer boroughs of this world’s cities. There are whispers that new developments will soon make immortality possible, with the mos Imagine a future in which death is close to being eradicated. At birth, everyone is allocated a number which determines whether or not they will be a ‘lifer’, a person who will live for hundreds of years with the aid of surgical enhancements and advanced biological technology. Those with a natural lifespan – ‘sub-100s’ – are effectively an underclass, relegated to the outer boroughs of this world’s cities. There are whispers that new developments will soon make immortality possible, with the most diligent lifers certain to be first in line. As for the existence the lifers actually have – it’s like wellness culture taken to the absolute extreme. Life has been stripped of everything pleasurable, from fatty food (artery-clogging) to exercise (too much of a strain on the body). Little wonder, then, that some rebel, forming a rule-flouting group they call the Suicide Club. At the centre of this story is Lea, who’s just turned 100. She's a model lifer for whom immortality is the ultimate dream. But she’s hiding a turbulent past and painful secrets. When she sees her father Kaito – missing for decades – in the street, she runs after him and is hit by a car. This is interpreted as a suicide attempt, and Lea finds herself under observation and forced to attend ‘WeCovery’ group counselling sessions. Also in WeCovery is Anja, whose life is devoted to caring for a mother who's all but dead due to faulty tech. Between Anja and Kaito, Lea is drawn into the murky world of the Suicide Club: part activist group, part ironic celebration. This is an intriguing premise, and raises a lot of fascinating ethical questions. I was particularly interested in the way Lea’s fanatical ‘life-loving’ mindset drew clear parallels with the views of extreme anti-abortionists. The execution is, unfortunately, a bit clunky, and I struggled to suspend disbelief enough to accept that Lea was really a hundred years old. She’s just so shallow – none of the accrued wisdom or knowledge I would expect of someone of such an age, regardless of her outward appearance. (Also, honestly, one wonders why ‘unhealthy’ behaviour would matter quite so much once bio-technology had evolved to the point that people could be essentially made unkillable. And once you start thinking about things like this, the entire setup begins to crumble.) I loved the concept, but there was something missing from Suicide Club for me. It feels very much like an imperfect debut from a writer who will go on to greater things: some of the plot’s potential is not quite realised, and the whole story lacks tension. Nevertheless, I love the originality of Rachel Heng’s ideas and will be keeping an eye out for her future work. I received an advance review copy of Suicide Club from the publisher through NetGalley. TinyLetter | Twitter | Instagram | Tumblr

  11. 4 out of 5

    Ova - Excuse My Reading

    Unfortunately didn't finish- although reading up to 77% The start was perfect. Over a hundred years old and a dedicated lifer, Lea has an accident after seeing her longtime lost dad- and she cannot tell anyone about this. Because her dad is kind of a criminal. So the authorities think she was trying to kill herself by throwing herself under a car. And then she has to get inspected. Then there is Anja, her once famous opera singer mum is hundred years old and bound to machines, and she's trapped in Unfortunately didn't finish- although reading up to 77% The start was perfect. Over a hundred years old and a dedicated lifer, Lea has an accident after seeing her longtime lost dad- and she cannot tell anyone about this. Because her dad is kind of a criminal. So the authorities think she was trying to kill herself by throwing herself under a car. And then she has to get inspected. Then there is Anja, her once famous opera singer mum is hundred years old and bound to machines, and she's trapped in her own life as her mum's heart is trapped in hers. I won't lie- I found Anja's story far more poetic and beautiful. However the book is mainly about Lea. These two's path intersect in a support group-ish session. Beyond this point the story became very boring, and uninteresting. Of course there is also the Suicide Club, with ties to Lea's dad, assisting people to kill themselves and somehow celebrating death rather than life. I was astonished by the start and got myself ready for a dystopian sci-fi. However it didn't take long for it to transform into a story of these two women's lives and personal problems. We are introduced to tougher human bodies with technologies as Diamond skin, good-for-you lab food nutripacks, etc. But the world building unfortunately doesn't go beyond that. After 77% I realised that I am no longer interested in what will happen. I wanted to like this book so much, as I think the subject is so promising and a great idea however it didn't work for me, such a shame. 2.5 stars rounding up to 3.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Monnie

    "Brave New World." "Soylent Green." "Thelma and Louise." All of these - and a couple more classics - popped into my head as I read this mesmerizing debut novel. More to the point, if I were given the chance to live for hundreds of years - most of them sans anything I now consider fun to do, eat or wear - would I want it? Now that I've finished this book, I'm still not totally sure, but I've sure got plenty of considerations to factor into my decision (and a doggone good story to illustrate them) "Brave New World." "Soylent Green." "Thelma and Louise." All of these - and a couple more classics - popped into my head as I read this mesmerizing debut novel. More to the point, if I were given the chance to live for hundreds of years - most of them sans anything I now consider fun to do, eat or wear - would I want it? Now that I've finished this book, I'm still not totally sure, but I've sure got plenty of considerations to factor into my decision (and a doggone good story to illustrate them). The setting is New York City sometime in the future, when research has found ways for people to live to 100 and far beyond. Those "Lifers" - chosen mostly according to genetic tests - get regular "maintenance" and replacement parts, like fake but realistic skin, blood and internal organs. They also must follow strict and ever-changing dictums; they cannot, for instance, eat bacon or open windows because doing these things might be detrimental to their well-being. Now, these Lifers are looking forward to the Third Wave, when those selected to be on The List will receive updates that will allow them to live to 300. Two of these Lifers are Lea and Anja; Lea is about 80 years old and Anja is just over 100. Lea, whose mother died not too long ago, enjoys super success in her career (her father left the family years ago). Anja is caring for her 150-year-old mother, who remains alive - if one could call it that - only because her fake parts are still working (but they're starting to wear out). Anja is also a somewhat reluctant member of the Suicide Club, a group of Lifers who have come to reject the concept of extreme longevity and at some point commit suicide to escape both the fakeness of their bodies and the absence of a truly enjoyable life. Quite unexpectly, Lea's idyllic existence gets a jolt. Hit by a car when she veers off the standard walking path to chase a man she thinks is her long-disappeared father, she finds herself constantly monitored by the "Observers," who believe she was attempting suicide - a no-no for anyone who aspires to be named to The List. Since her father is an outcast from the utopian society in which she thrives, she dare not tell the truth - that she was trying to reach him and simply not paying attention to her surroundings. The future of her perfect life now in limbo, Lea tries to prove she's still worthy of The List. She's also been ordered to group therapy sessions, and it is here that she meets Anja, who works with "Sub-100s" - the folks who didn't qualify for replacement parts and will die naturally of old age. Still looking for ways to redeem herself, Lea goes to a meeting of the Suicide Club, where she sees not only Anja, but someone else who's very special to her. Even if it didn't touch on touchy subjects like engineered humans and euthanasia, this would be a wonderful book simply because of the characters. They're real, they question life and don't always get the answers they seek. But raising those issues makes it even more meaningful; as the characters try to deal with them, readers must do the same (and I admit I didn't come away with conclusive answers). All told, this is a totally engrossing, powerful story I highly recommend, and I thank the publisher, via NetGalley, for the opportunity to read an advance review copy.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Melanie Garrett

    #SuicideClub is a gripping debut for fans of Margaret Atwood, Emily St John Mandel & George Saunders. If you like your near-future dystopias compelling and poignant, with clear philosophical underpinnings which question the way we live now, then get ready to join the Suicide Club. A tale of two loving daughters coming to terms with their parents’ mortality - or lack thereof. The action unfolds in a New York City that is still recognisable (nary a jet pack or flying car in sight) but where th #SuicideClub is a gripping debut for fans of Margaret Atwood, Emily St John Mandel & George Saunders. If you like your near-future dystopias compelling and poignant, with clear philosophical underpinnings which question the way we live now, then get ready to join the Suicide Club. A tale of two loving daughters coming to terms with their parents’ mortality - or lack thereof. The action unfolds in a New York City that is still recognisable (nary a jet pack or flying car in sight) but where the population is divided into bio-enhanced ‘Lifers’ and those who are deemed Sub 100s - i.e. unlikely to live more than a mere hundred years. In a world where the state devotes so much time and money keeping its enhanced Lifers alive, euthanasia and suicide are not just highly illegal, but a complete moral anathema. For some, like Lea (a young woman of 130), this makes complete sense. Who in their right mind wouldn’t want to live forever? For more than a century, Lea’s had her eyes-on-prize of joining the Third Wave and become one of the first true Immortals. It’s the pinnacle of everything she’s ever strived for in two lifetimes of relentless over-achieving. Now, just as she is poised to see it all through, something happens. This ‘something’ is the sort of tiny, inconsequential event which the likes of you and I might walk away from without looking back. But for Lea, it could well mean the difference between eternity and mortality. As a result of this, Lea’s path crosses with Anja, another Lifer, locked in her own struggle with immortality. What to do with an elderly mother whose enhanced body has all but given out? No longer alive, in the sense that you or I would recognise, and yet with a heart that has been specifically designed to keep on ticking. So, what if you are going to live forever, but simply don’t want to? That’s when, you join the Club and, perversely, act on the side of death in the name of love. One of the things I particularly enjoyed about the dystopic elements of Suicide Club was the strangest things were little more than the logical extension of our how current obsessions with youth and health are being taken to almost religious extremes in some quarters. In doing so, Ms Heng makes us ask ourselves, what price immortality? Having said this, what I love most about this novel are the characters and the poignancy of their situations and dilemmas, and the sheer beauty of the prose. The ending was particularly beautiful, but I didn’t want it to happen. I would happily have kept reading the same amount again and cannot wait to see what Rachel Heng does next. It won’t surprise me in slightest if this ends up being a major Netflix series. Hopefully in my Lifetime. I am grateful to the publisher for letting me see an advance copy of Suicide Club.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Liz Barnsley

    DNF at 56%. Brilliant premise but just couldn't engage at all. It started off well but then descended into a rather humdrum tale of two women. The world building just wasn't there and honestly it felt like I'd actually have to live forever in order to be inclined to finish it. On the plus side for others it's good writing and if you are looking for more drama than sci-fi dystopia you'd probably love it. Great idea subjective failed execution..

  15. 5 out of 5

    Cindy H.

    Thank you to Henry Holt Publishing and NetGalley for providing me with an ARC on The Suicide Club for my honest review. The haunting cover of this intriguing titled novel quickly caught my eye and the premise was equally engaging. My disappointment with this dystopian story was the lack of plot movement,character motivation and connection to Lea, the main character. I was also confused by the shifting time of past and present and found the childhood trauma of Lea jarring and lackluster. Too much Thank you to Henry Holt Publishing and NetGalley for providing me with an ARC on The Suicide Club for my honest review. The haunting cover of this intriguing titled novel quickly caught my eye and the premise was equally engaging. My disappointment with this dystopian story was the lack of plot movement,character motivation and connection to Lea, the main character. I was also confused by the shifting time of past and present and found the childhood trauma of Lea jarring and lackluster. Too much suspension of belief left me underwhelmed. I did enjoy the first third of the novel, learning about "lifer's" and the routine and procedures they endure in order to live beyond 100. The premise of this futuristic world was fascinating but ultimately I needed more of a story.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Roman Clodia

    There's an interesting premise here that extends logically from our present preoccupation with youth, health and longevity: in the US, technologies have been found that can extend life into hundreds of years with artificial blood, self-renewing skin and long-life muscles. But only for those with the 'right' genetic structure and who are prepared to sacrifice anything that can inhibit long life: meat, sugar, alcohol, anything that raises stress/cortisol/adrenaline levels - but with so many restri There's an interesting premise here that extends logically from our present preoccupation with youth, health and longevity: in the US, technologies have been found that can extend life into hundreds of years with artificial blood, self-renewing skin and long-life muscles. But only for those with the 'right' genetic structure and who are prepared to sacrifice anything that can inhibit long life: meat, sugar, alcohol, anything that raises stress/cortisol/adrenaline levels - but with so many restrictions on pleasure, is a long life worth living, this book asks. It's unusual for me to be wanting more from a piece of contemporary fiction: more usually I'm wanting it to dial back on the multiple plots, the action, the filler - but here I felt that Heng could have expanded productively: in characterisation and motivation, in world-building, in plot. At the moment, this is intriguing but feels like a single-idea book, a short story expanded into a novel. It follows the conventional dystopia arc of a protagonist who kicks against the system but unlike, say, The Handmaid's Tale or 1984 the stakes don't feel particularly high. There are some interesting updates to Brave New World, perhaps. Intriguing, for sure, but also a bit unsatisfying. Thanks to Hodder & Stoughton for an ARC via NetGalley

  17. 4 out of 5

    OutlawPoet

    When I finished Suicide Club, I surprised myself. I closed the Kindle and said, "What a beautiful book." And it really was. It's funny to say that a near future SF novel like this is beautiful, but that's how I felt after finishing it. I felt witness to something unique and lovely. Oh, the book is sad of course, but there's so much beauty in choosing your own life and your own death. Heng forces us to look at how much emphasis society places on youth and beauty and all that impossible to attain perf When I finished Suicide Club, I surprised myself. I closed the Kindle and said, "What a beautiful book." And it really was. It's funny to say that a near future SF novel like this is beautiful, but that's how I felt after finishing it. I felt witness to something unique and lovely. Oh, the book is sad of course, but there's so much beauty in choosing your own life and your own death. Heng forces us to look at how much emphasis society places on youth and beauty and all that impossible to attain perfection. And in this novel, if you aren't perfect or don't want to be perfect, there must be something dreadfully wrong with you...and if so, isn't it better if you simply weren't allowed to progress? I loved as our main character began to realize there was so much more than what the government wanted people to believe - and so much dignity in age and experience, and yes, even in dying in a way that befits you. An excellent read. *ARC Provide via Net Galley

  18. 4 out of 5

    Gemma F

    Update: April 11, 2018 I'm so impressed right now. This is one book that gave me so many emotions and made me cry. Suicide Club reminded me of a mix between Black Mirror and this futuristic world that Rachel Heng created. I loved the themes, relationships between family, the overall impression of immortality and the way humankind was described in this book. Full review to come closer to the release date! July 18, 2017 So stoked for this book written by a Singaporean! Can't wait to read this! 💕

  19. 4 out of 5

    Ova - Excuse My Reading

    Unfortunately didn't finish- although reading up to 77% The start was perfect. Over a hundred years old and a dedicated lifer, Lea has an accident after seeing her longtime lost dad- and she cannot tell anyone about this. Because her dad is kind of a criminal. So the authorities think she was trying to kill herself by throwing herself under a car. And then she has to get inspected. Then there is Anja, her once famous opera singer mum is hundreds of years old and bound to machines, and she's trappe Unfortunately didn't finish- although reading up to 77% The start was perfect. Over a hundred years old and a dedicated lifer, Lea has an accident after seeing her longtime lost dad- and she cannot tell anyone about this. Because her dad is kind of a criminal. So the authorities think she was trying to kill herself by throwing herself under a car. And then she has to get inspected. Then there is Anja, her once famous opera singer mum is hundreds of years old and bound to machines, and she's trapped in her own life as her mum's heart is trapped in hers. I won't lie- I found Anja's story far more poetic and beautiful. However the book is mainly about Lea. These two's path intersect in a support group-ish session. Beyond this point the story became very boring, and uninteresting. Of course there is also the Suicide Club, with ties to Lea's dad, assisting people to kill themselves and somehow celebrating death rather than life. I was astonished by the start and got myself ready for a dystopian sci-fi. However it didn't take long for it to transform into a story of these two women's lives and personal problems. We are introduced to tougher human bodies with technologies as Diamond skin, good-for-you lab food nutripacks, etc. But the world building unfortunately doesn't go beyond that. After 77% I realised that I am no longer interested in what will happen. I wanted to like this book so much, as I think the subject is so promising and a great idea however it didn't work for me, such a shame. 2.5 stars rounding up to 3. Thanks to Netgalley and publisher for a free copy of this book in exchange for an honest review.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Kaleena ★ Reader Voracious

    "Something has to change. In being robbed of our deaths, we are robbed of our lives." Suicide Club is a chilling tale of a near-future dystopia where population decline has led to strict Sanctity of Life laws and systems to extend life ever longer. Poetically written, Heng weaves a dystopian nightmare that is plausible; however, I struggled to connect to the story as I had expected to and was left wanting much more. The novel takes place in a New York City that closely resembles modern day, wh "Something has to change. In being robbed of our deaths, we are robbed of our lives." Suicide Club is a chilling tale of a near-future dystopia where population decline has led to strict Sanctity of Life laws and systems to extend life ever longer. Poetically written, Heng weaves a dystopian nightmare that is plausible; however, I struggled to connect to the story as I had expected to and was left wanting much more. The novel takes place in a New York City that closely resembles modern day, which both adds to the fear of this potential reality as well as creates a dissonance between the futuristic technologies that are not really explained. There is a lot of jargon used that did not seem to be explained, which I found to be distracting - like DiamondSkin is something that I should be intimately aware of, or that a Tender is something that I personally understand. Suicide Club is told in two alternating points of view, something that I didn't realize right away. I found myself confusing backstories and just being confused until I went back and re-read. I love dual-POVs done well, but I struggle when the narrative shift isn't clearly notated and the perspectives bleed together. The first 20% of the book or so recalls the back histories of the two main characters and I struggled keeping everything straight. I found myself not really caring much about the characters in the beginning of the book, although by the end I did care a bit for Lea and Anja. For me, the story was lacking in explanation of what steps led the population to this point, the political Ministry and its purpose left largely unexplored. With comparisons to Margaret Atwood, I found this to be particularly disappointing as I find Atwood's writing to be largely about the political systems as well as the system's impact on the central characters. I can see what Heng was trying to emulate, but for me it missed the mark. "Someone once said that death was the best invention life had to offer." In my opinion, the overall story would have been stronger if the beginning of the novel spent a bit of time directly exploring the political climate, explaining what it meant to be a lifer or antisanc, how the tests at birth and the numbers play into the scheme of things. I found a lot of compellingly interesting tidbits about society that weren't explored. What is causing the population decline, what is the history of the Replacement business, why all the laws about taking care of yourself? Why the Lists and WeCovery? In a world where suicide is a sin and used as a form of civil disobedience, I feel that answering some of these questions would have strengthened the narrative. I found the lack of worldbuilding in a near-future dystopia to be the main reason that I struggled to connect with the story, and I was left wanting more. I found Suicide Club to be an interesting and innovative premise, Heng writes with lyrical prose and I look forward to reading her future work and seeing her develop as a writer. This is more of a story about family and choice and less about the dystopian world. I think readers who are interested in family dynamics and the personal story of the characters will enjoy this book, but those who are looking for a dystopian thriller with political intrigue may be disappointed. Thank you to NetGalley and the publisher, Henry Holt & Company, for providing me with an e-arc of this book in exchange for my honest review. Blog | Twitter | Pinterest

  21. 5 out of 5

    Alexis

    I loved the concept behind this book. In the future, the population is falling. To try to keep it up, people are strongly encouraged to be super healthy and get various body enhancements and replacements. As a result, some people live to be over 100. Then there are the others - the sub-100s - who are the second-class citizens, who live and die like the mortals they are. The storyline is also really interesting. Lea is a lifer, and she tries so hard to be perfect. She has a great job, a fiancee, a I loved the concept behind this book. In the future, the population is falling. To try to keep it up, people are strongly encouraged to be super healthy and get various body enhancements and replacements. As a result, some people live to be over 100. Then there are the others - the sub-100s - who are the second-class citizens, who live and die like the mortals they are. The storyline is also really interesting. Lea is a lifer, and she tries so hard to be perfect. She has a great job, a fiancee, and she does everything according to the government-issued directives. But one day she sees a face from her past in the crowd, and her life crashes down around her. The plot follows her as she tries to make everything perfect again. The characters are quite hard to get to know, as they are not quite human, with their enhancements and the strange lifestyles they have. You do however get to know the main characters, Lea and Anja, quite well as the story progresses. Their past experiences have made them who they are and these are revealed gradually. However I wouldn't say that I could understand any of the characters, and nor do I like them. This detachment didn't ruin the book for me though, it was very much concept-driven rather than character-based, and I felt like the aloofness of the characters fit perfectly. This is how everyone is in this world because everything is so clinical and nobody would dare to reveal their true selves and risk the disapproval of others. The pace is pretty slow, and this is not a tense or exciting book. It is full of intrigue however, and I never lost interest. I couldn't predict what would happen, which I really liked. Overall I really enjoyed this book in a low-key sort of way. It is well written and the ideas are great. On the down side, I don't think I will remember it, just because there was no excitement. On the up side, it wasn't what I thought it was going to be from reading the description, and this turned out to be a very good thing.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Ellie (faerieontheshelf)

    RTC to come! 3.5 stars, rounded up on goodreads just because I liked the last chapter lol - like black mirror but tbh not as provoking and inquisitive as I’d hoped for a book that essentially deals with issues akin to euthanasia and artificially lengthened lifespans 🤷🏻♀ RTC to come! 3.5 stars, rounded up on goodreads just because I liked the last chapter lol - like black mirror but tbh not as provoking and inquisitive as I’d hoped for a book that essentially deals with issues akin to euthanasia and artificially lengthened lifespans 🤷🏻‍♀️

  23. 4 out of 5

    Maria

    Review to come.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Emily Ross

    Thank you to the publishers for providing an ARC of this book through NetGalley. DNF at 20%. I got a fifth of the way through this book and there isn't a defined plot yet. It's so slow and there is absolutely no world building. I only knew people could aim for immortality because of the blurb. I can't remember who the main character is, but she was deathly boring.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Wendi Lee

    In the future, genetic testing at birth determines who gets to extend their life via special medical procedures and maintenance. Lea is a “lifer,” striving to be one of the first chosen for the Third Wave, which basically equals immortality. Lea does everything right, but seeing her estranged (and assumed deceased) father puts her future in jeopardy. I liked the premise of this novel, and Lea’s difficulty in reconciling her past with the safe existence of lifers. I liked Anja even more, a violini In the future, genetic testing at birth determines who gets to extend their life via special medical procedures and maintenance. Lea is a “lifer,” striving to be one of the first chosen for the Third Wave, which basically equals immortality. Lea does everything right, but seeing her estranged (and assumed deceased) father puts her future in jeopardy. I liked the premise of this novel, and Lea’s difficulty in reconciling her past with the safe existence of lifers. I liked Anja even more, a violinist lifer who doesn’t share the same financial luxuries, or rose-colored outlook. Unfortunately, I’m a character driven reader, and I couldn’t completely empathize with Lea. There are events in her life that are disturbing, and I don’t think that enough time on the page is spent on them. I felt more for Anja, but found it frustrating that the two main characters spent most of the novel avoiding one another. This also made the ending a bit unbelievable, at least for me. Thank you to Netgalley and the publisher for an arc.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Ashley

    DNF at 33%. Suicide Club definitely has an interesting premise - people who can basically live forever and a government that ensures everyone strives to do that. But sadly it didn't draw me in. 1. For starters, I read like at least 25% of the book not realizing there were two points of view. At that point I had no idea how much I'd mixed up their two backstories. I have no idea which pieces of history belong with which person. X_X 2. All the new product/company names started to weigh on me. Observe DNF at 33%. Suicide Club definitely has an interesting premise - people who can basically live forever and a government that ensures everyone strives to do that. But sadly it didn't draw me in. 1. For starters, I read like at least 25% of the book not realizing there were two points of view. At that point I had no idea how much I'd mixed up their two backstories. I have no idea which pieces of history belong with which person. X_X 2. All the new product/company names started to weigh on me. Observers, WeCovery, SmartBlood, sub-100s, Repairants, I think there was some kind of "DiamondSkin", etc. I guess I just felt like I was drowning in it all. 3. I feel like maybe I was expecting a cool, futuristic, dystopian thriller. But instead this felt a lot more like a personal/family story and that wasn't what I was looking for. At least half of what I read was about backstory, old family stories, etc. It just wasn't that interesting to me. I think ultimately I just expected one thing and got something else, and because of that I had a hard time connecting to the characters and everything that was going on. (Speaking of which, it didn't feel like that much actually was going on since we spent so much time on backstories.)

  27. 4 out of 5

    Kathleen

    I think this book needed more of everything. More world building. More character development. More plot. The concept was a really interesting one, and I thought the plot was just really slow moving, until I got to the end are realized there just wasn't much of one. Honestly I had a hard time pushing myself to finish. I wish there had been more about how this new future worked, how it got that way and why the US seemed to be alone in it. I think that may have helped to hold more of my interest. I I think this book needed more of everything. More world building. More character development. More plot. The concept was a really interesting one, and I thought the plot was just really slow moving, until I got to the end are realized there just wasn't much of one. Honestly I had a hard time pushing myself to finish. I wish there had been more about how this new future worked, how it got that way and why the US seemed to be alone in it. I think that may have helped to hold more of my interest. I received an advanced copy of this book from NetGalley and the publisher in exchange for an honest review.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Jen

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. NOPE The title pulled me in (I can be a little macabre at times) but although the futurized world was interesting the story itself was not. I didn't care for the main character and everything that happened pretty much amounted to nought by the end of the novel which made it feel like the biggest waste of time. Again; I loved the world/setting but the characters and direction of the story was a flop for me. (super early ARC so many things may have changed by the time this novel is released!)

  29. 4 out of 5

    Stacey (prettybooks)

    It's so much fun delving into science fiction. I used to read sci-fi often, mainly the YA dystopia and post-apocalytic type. I love reading about societies that are similar to our own, but feature advanced technology and despotic governments – although I guess this is becoming more fact, less fiction! "In near-future New York, life expectancy averages three hundred years. Immortality is almost within our grasp. It’s hell." As soon as I read the above tagline, I knew Suicide Club was for me. Contin It's so much fun delving into science fiction. I used to read sci-fi often, mainly the YA dystopia and post-apocalytic type. I love reading about societies that are similar to our own, but feature advanced technology and despotic governments – although I guess this is becoming more fact, less fiction! "In near-future New York, life expectancy averages three hundred years. Immortality is almost within our grasp. It’s hell." As soon as I read the above tagline, I knew Suicide Club was for me. Continue reading this review over on Pretty Books.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Olga Fry

    Lea Kirino leads a picturesque life until a chance encounter with her estranged father throws her life into a tailspin. From there, her status as a "Lifer," someone with the potential to live forever is thrown into jeopardy as she grapples with a difficult decision. Does she want to repair her relationship with her father who has been out of her life for decades, or does she want to live life the way she always has; a genetically beautiful fiance, a gorgeous apartment, and a high-paying, respect Lea Kirino leads a picturesque life until a chance encounter with her estranged father throws her life into a tailspin. From there, her status as a "Lifer," someone with the potential to live forever is thrown into jeopardy as she grapples with a difficult decision. Does she want to repair her relationship with her father who has been out of her life for decades, or does she want to live life the way she always has; a genetically beautiful fiance, a gorgeous apartment, and a high-paying, respected position? For starters, the cover is beautiful. While the title refers to a "Suicide Club," for all purposes, suicide is illegal in this futuristic version of New York City, as is anything unhealthy, even running. The population is in decline so people must stay alive by whatever means necessary, even skin transplants. The world that Rachel Heng created is fascinating; all these restrictions, the difference between what is good and bad, wellness. The book is divided into alternating viewpoints: Lea, as the reader watches her and the consequences of her decisions play out, and Anja, a classically trained musician with a mother tied to bed rest. In the past, her mother's body was used to test new procedures and while her heart is still beating, she is brain-dead. I really enjoyed spending time with Anja and found it difficult to get into Lea's sections. The beginning was good but the middle flat-lined for me to speak, and never quite recovered. While I enjoyed their interactions together, I was a little upset that we didn't see most of it until it began to pick up towards the halfway mark. The pacing was rather slow for me. The writing is beautiful and I would certainly check out a future book of Heng's.

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