kode adsense disini
Hot Best Seller

Dear America: Notes of an Undocumented Citizen

Availability: Ready to download

Pulitzer-Prize winning journalist Jose Antonio Vargas, called “the most famous undocumented immigrant in America,” tackles one of the defining issues of our time in this explosive and deeply personal call to arms. “This is not a book about the politics of immigration. This book––at its core––is not about immigration at all. This book is about homelessness, not in a traditio Pulitzer-Prize winning journalist Jose Antonio Vargas, called “the most famous undocumented immigrant in America,” tackles one of the defining issues of our time in this explosive and deeply personal call to arms. “This is not a book about the politics of immigration. This book––at its core––is not about immigration at all. This book is about homelessness, not in a traditional sense, but in the unsettled, unmoored psychological state that undocumented immigrants like myself find ourselves in. This book is about lying and being forced to lie to get by; about passing as an American and as a contributing citizen; about families, keeping them together, and having to make new ones when you can’t. This book is about constantly hiding from the government and, in the process, hiding from ourselves. This book is about what it means to not have a home. After 25 years of living illegally in a country that does not consider me one of its own, this book is the closest thing I have to freedom.” —Jose Antonio Vargas, from Dear America


Compare
kode adsense disini

Pulitzer-Prize winning journalist Jose Antonio Vargas, called “the most famous undocumented immigrant in America,” tackles one of the defining issues of our time in this explosive and deeply personal call to arms. “This is not a book about the politics of immigration. This book––at its core––is not about immigration at all. This book is about homelessness, not in a traditio Pulitzer-Prize winning journalist Jose Antonio Vargas, called “the most famous undocumented immigrant in America,” tackles one of the defining issues of our time in this explosive and deeply personal call to arms. “This is not a book about the politics of immigration. This book––at its core––is not about immigration at all. This book is about homelessness, not in a traditional sense, but in the unsettled, unmoored psychological state that undocumented immigrants like myself find ourselves in. This book is about lying and being forced to lie to get by; about passing as an American and as a contributing citizen; about families, keeping them together, and having to make new ones when you can’t. This book is about constantly hiding from the government and, in the process, hiding from ourselves. This book is about what it means to not have a home. After 25 years of living illegally in a country that does not consider me one of its own, this book is the closest thing I have to freedom.” —Jose Antonio Vargas, from Dear America

30 review for Dear America: Notes of an Undocumented Citizen

  1. 5 out of 5

    Mehrsa

    This book is at its best when it is an honest memoir, which is about 2/3rds of the book. He talks about the tensions in his Phillipino family between the "legal" and the "illegal" and then the shock when he finds out his greencard is fake. I wish people could understand when they talk about "illegals" that these are humans just like them. The later portion of the book was still good, but I wished he would stay with his own story as opposed to trying to respond to all his critics. Apparently, a l This book is at its best when it is an honest memoir, which is about 2/3rds of the book. He talks about the tensions in his Phillipino family between the "legal" and the "illegal" and then the shock when he finds out his greencard is fake. I wish people could understand when they talk about "illegals" that these are humans just like them. The later portion of the book was still good, but I wished he would stay with his own story as opposed to trying to respond to all his critics. Apparently, a lot of people from both sides of the immigration issue have criticized him for his advocacy. But let haters hate and tell your story. You don't need to tell everyone else's story. I, for one, will read anyone's story if it's honest.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Brad Bowman

    Utilizing his own experience, Vargas imbues discussions of displacement, residency, and identity with the utmost humanity. Most poignant are his reflections on his own belonging. “Trading a private life that was in limbo for a public life that is still in limbo...” (184) Vargas is most insightful when he’s looking inward and sharing his emotions of loss, losing, and being lost in his own American story. “Dear America” questions as much as it tries to answer, but importantly it’s a necessary narra Utilizing his own experience, Vargas imbues discussions of displacement, residency, and identity with the utmost humanity. Most poignant are his reflections on his own belonging. “Trading a private life that was in limbo for a public life that is still in limbo...” (184) Vargas is most insightful when he’s looking inward and sharing his emotions of loss, losing, and being lost in his own American story. “Dear America” questions as much as it tries to answer, but importantly it’s a necessary narrative that speaks to the dysphoria that is part of a larger immigrant experience. It’s a small portait of experience but one that fits into a larger, more contextual mosaic. These stories are imperative for rhetoric, statistics, and laws surrounding immigration because it grounds them with the lives and families they affect. Vargas, amongst others, is a testament to the many ways of being American.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Charlene

    Would recommend this book to everyone for insight into our current immigration crisis. Vargas's name was vaguely familiar to me as a journalist when I first saw notices about this book's upcoming publication. He "outed" himself as undocumented several years ago through a dramatic NYT article in 2011; he wrote a cover story on undocumented immigrants (including himself) in 2012. But book isn't about legalities or politics, it is Vargas's own story. His mother put him on a plane as a child to joi Would recommend this book to everyone for insight into our current immigration crisis. Vargas's name was vaguely familiar to me as a journalist when I first saw notices about this book's upcoming publication. He "outed" himself as undocumented several years ago through a dramatic NYT article in 2011; he wrote a cover story on undocumented immigrants (including himself) in 2012. But book isn't about legalities or politics, it is Vargas's own story. His mother put him on a plane as a child to join his grandparents (naturalized American citizens) in California & that's where he grew up. He did not realize until he applied for a driver's license that the paperwork provided by his grandfather was fake. He was able to confide in a few school teachers/administrators who helped him to college and from there he was able to launch a very successful career. But after entering the country without documentation, it seems there's no practical way to get back on a path to legal residency and citizenship (that's something I did not understand before ). After more than 2/3rds of his life in America, Vargas is still in a state of "homelessness", even though he considers America his country. Book short and personal but does a good job of conveying the confusion and misperceptions about the current immigration policies in this country.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Shirley Freeman

    Here's another book every American should read. Not because it will cause us all to be of one mind concerning immigration but because it will give us all a starting point for civil discourse. It is the story of one real person behind the statistics. Many folks who are more in tune with current culture will know who Jose Antonio Vargas is but I had never heard of him. He's a Pulitzer Prize winning journalist who discovered he was undocumented when he went to apply for a driver's license at age 16 Here's another book every American should read. Not because it will cause us all to be of one mind concerning immigration but because it will give us all a starting point for civil discourse. It is the story of one real person behind the statistics. Many folks who are more in tune with current culture will know who Jose Antonio Vargas is but I had never heard of him. He's a Pulitzer Prize winning journalist who discovered he was undocumented when he went to apply for a driver's license at age 16. Originally from the Philipines, Vargas has lived in the U.S. for 25 years. He's now 37 and hasn't seen his mother since she put him on a plane when he was 12. His story is one of incredible resilience and bravery and also lying and homelessness (as in having no country he can call home). I feel called to become more educated about immigration and to become part of the solution to our current struggles. (to be published in September)

  5. 4 out of 5

    Veronica

    This is a tough but necessary read. There's so much I didn't know about immigration and this shines light on some of that. For a nation made of immigrants, the US is currently making it difficult to continue to be such a nation. Can you imagine growing up and finding out you're here illegally and not having any recourse to really change that?

  6. 4 out of 5

    Jessica

    from my review submitted to Indie Next: The first thing you should know about this book is that it is not arsenal for current political debate. It is coincidentally a very timely memoir of a young Filipino boy sent to America as a child who remains unaware of his legal status until he became a teenager and attempted to get a driver's license. As he ages and continues to wrestle with what it means to be simultaneously American yet un-American, Vargas challenges the reader to "Define American" and from my review submitted to Indie Next: The first thing you should know about this book is that it is not arsenal for current political debate. It is coincidentally a very timely memoir of a young Filipino boy sent to America as a child who remains unaware of his legal status until he became a teenager and attempted to get a driver's license. As he ages and continues to wrestle with what it means to be simultaneously American yet un-American, Vargas challenges the reader to "Define American" and enlightens us on the condition of our bipartisan-broken immigration system. Dear America is a fascinating, eye-opening, important read I would recommend to everyone.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Brian Kovesci

    This book needs to be read. "There comes a moment in each of our lives when we must confront the central truth in order for life to go on." (p. 110)

  8. 4 out of 5

    Megan Lawson

    Every single person in America should read this book. Jose Antonio Vargas tells his story, his experiences, his how, and his why of being an undocumented citizen of the United States. If you want to change opinions, if you want to help people understand other cultures, other lives, the best way is through stories and personal connections. Obviously, I don't know Vargas personally but I have taught many students who have had similar experiences. What would you do if you suddenly found out at 16 th Every single person in America should read this book. Jose Antonio Vargas tells his story, his experiences, his how, and his why of being an undocumented citizen of the United States. If you want to change opinions, if you want to help people understand other cultures, other lives, the best way is through stories and personal connections. Obviously, I don't know Vargas personally but I have taught many students who have had similar experiences. What would you do if you suddenly found out at 16 that you had no legal documentation for the country that you had come to call home? What would you do if, despite what the news media likes to expel, there is no real "path" for citizenship or a "line" to get into without completely destroying the entire life you have lived or waiting in a broken land for decades? What would you do if your home wasn't safe and your children were dying? "Inside the cell I came to the conclusion that we do not have a broken immigration system. We don't. What we're doing - waving a "Keep Out!" flag at the Mexican border while holding up a Help Wanted sign a hundred yards in - is deliberate. Spending billions building fences and walls, locking people up like livestock, deporting people to keep the people we don't want out, tearing families apart, breaking spirits - all of that serves a purpose. People are forced to lie, people spend years if not decades passing in some kind of purgatory. And step by step, this immigration system is set up to do exactly what it does. Dear America, is this what you really want? Do you even know what is happening in your name? I don't know what else you want from us. I don't know what else you need us to do."

  9. 4 out of 5

    Dawnette Brenner

    Finished this one in two days! I couldn’t put it down. It was as if my mother were reading to me about her life, supporting all people. She truly did, marching with Cesar Chavez, working on farms, so did I. We were never “too good” as ‘white people!’ This book though; amazing, horrific and brought me to tears. We must do something to end ALL FORMS of discrimination! This week I’ve spoken with several guests on my show about mental health & illness. While reading #Dearamerica I couldn’t help but Finished this one in two days! I couldn’t put it down. It was as if my mother were reading to me about her life, supporting all people. She truly did, marching with Cesar Chavez, working on farms, so did I. We were never “too good” as ‘white people!’ This book though; amazing, horrific and brought me to tears. We must do something to end ALL FORMS of discrimination! This week I’ve spoken with several guests on my show about mental health & illness. While reading #Dearamerica I couldn’t help but ponder the psychological affects on children that are being told their illegal, after being brought to America. They too are seeking the chance for a better life. Are we dehumanizing people? How can a person be “illegal” anyway? . My mother raised me to respect everyone, despite their religion, nationality, skin color, gender, sexual orientation or psychological state. Everyone should be treated with respect, decency and kindness. I looked up immigrant, it states: im·mi·grant ˈiməɡrənt/Submit noun a person who comes to live permanently in a foreign country. Everyone coming to this country immigrated. 70%+ of Americans are immigrants! Why are we treating people that call the USA their home, so poorly? Jose is innocent, he came here through no choice of his own. He is an upstanding citizen, and contributes to our economy and has made a positive contribution to the world of journalism. . #humanize #advocate #undocumented #redefineamerica #joseantoniovargas #journalism #pulitzer #mindfulness #filipinoamerican #borders

  10. 4 out of 5

    Lindsey

    **I received an ARC of this book from my local bookstore in exchange for a review.** Jose Antonio Vargas, author of Dear America: Notes of an Undocumented Citizen, was born in the Philippines. At age 12 his mother sent him to the United States to live with her parents. At sixteen Vargas discovers that his papers are fake. Still, decades later at the writing of this book, Vargas is still here illegally. In Dear America, Vargas chronicles his journey from leaving the Philippines at the age of 12 to **I received an ARC of this book from my local bookstore in exchange for a review.** Jose Antonio Vargas, author of Dear America: Notes of an Undocumented Citizen, was born in the Philippines. At age 12 his mother sent him to the United States to live with her parents. At sixteen Vargas discovers that his papers are fake. Still, decades later at the writing of this book, Vargas is still here illegally. In Dear America, Vargas chronicles his journey from leaving the Philippines at the age of 12 to growing up with his mother's parents and discovering the fake papers. He gives credit to those who helped him as a high school student, as a young adult getting his first journalist job, and so on. Through all of this the reader is able to witness Vargas' struggles, his pain, and most of all his constant worry of what might happen to him if his secret is ever found out. This book is a call to arms. A whistle blowing on what it is like to live in fear every day as an undocumented individual. It is also posing the question of what does it mean to be American? How does our country and its leaders define "American," provided they even give any thought to it. This is one of the many questions Vargas asks over and over again throughout the course of the book. This is a book about lying to get by, about families, and about what it means to not really have a home. Even though this is an ARC the errors in this book were numerous, and were sometimes distracting from the narrative. I hope that the published copy does more justice in this area to Vargas' story.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Dave

    If nothing else this remarkable and well written memoir serve to put a human face on the immigration issue in our nation. It is a quick and insightful read, that caused me to pause along the way and think hard about what it means to be an citizen of America. We are after all save for the Native Americans, and African Americans--- a country made up of immigrants. Some of have been fortunate enough to have our path to citizenship given to us by nature of our birth doing nothing to earn it. our pat If nothing else this remarkable and well written memoir serve to put a human face on the immigration issue in our nation. It is a quick and insightful read, that caused me to pause along the way and think hard about what it means to be an citizen of America. We are after all save for the Native Americans, and African Americans--- a country made up of immigrants. Some of have been fortunate enough to have our path to citizenship given to us by nature of our birth doing nothing to earn it. our path to citizenship given to us by our ancestors. The book served for me to frame the issues in a human way and it was enough for me. I will hope to learn more

  12. 4 out of 5

    Lainey

    Book 114. Dear America by @joseiswriting. This familiar story is heartbreaking. Mixed status families is all too familiar to me. Hearing how someone offered to marry him was also a very familiar moment. So many people fail to understand how hard it is to become a citizen. How there is no line to get in for children who were brought here and did not know what was going on. How it is a privilege to never have to worry about your citizenship. Thank you Jose for sharing your story.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Marsha Dawson

    Very readable book about immigration and the life of an undocumented immigrant. Coming to the U.S. at 12 years old from the Philippines Vargas tells how he learned to fit in be American. Very honest book.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Jessica

    After all, if Americans could come and claim the Philippines, why can’t Filipinos move to America? This probably wouldn't have hit me as hard as it did if Vargas wasn't Filipino, but since he is, I saw so many of my loved ones in his story, from my mother and my countless aunties who did everything they could to get here to my family back in the Philippines who will never be allowed to come. This was the most difficult book I've ever read and I cried the whole time but it was 100% worth it.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Liz Fedor

    The beginning was fine but then it became quite whiny.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Terra

    I picked up this ARC and I could not put it down. I plan on getting my thoughts down to post a full review on my blog. This books comes out tomorrow and I can't wait to get a copy.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Cherie

    Advanced Reader’s Copy received from Baker & Taylor. “Dear America” is the heart-wrenching biography of a man struggling to identify himself as an American citizen when everything is working against him. Vargas’ journey illustrates just how difficult the path to citizenship can be, even for someone as well-connected as himself. “Why don’t you just become legal?” It’s the question at the heart of this book because it’s the muddiest gray area for those who are stuck in legal limbo like Vargas. Advanced Reader’s Copy received from Baker & Taylor. “Dear America” is the heart-wrenching biography of a man struggling to identify himself as an American citizen when everything is working against him. Vargas’ journey illustrates just how difficult the path to citizenship can be, even for someone as well-connected as himself. “Why don’t you just become legal?” It’s the question at the heart of this book because it’s the muddiest gray area for those who are stuck in legal limbo like Vargas. People think citizenship is black and white; like you can just go to the DMV, check a box, and it’s done. People act as if non-citizenship is a willful choice, an act of defiance, and treat you as a criminal when it’s not a matter of choice, it’s a matter of ability. And even when people learn the truth of the matter, there are those who are too un-empathetic, obstinate, and close-minded. Those who think self-deportation is what it comes down to when citizenship can’t be obtained. This book looks those people directly in the eyes and asks about home, identity, and what makes you American.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Georgette

    Excellent. Everyone in the United States should be reading this book in light of what's going on in this country.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Susan

    I am glad I picked this book up. I was looking for a book about immigration issue. This one is about what it's like to be undocumented. Mr. Vargas is not Mexican, but Phillipino. I found it interesting detail what it was like. It is interesting to read about living undocumented. As a teen he first learns he is here in US illegally. How he stays hidden, and fears he will get caught. It is interesting that he works as a journalist for the Washington Post out in the open. But, he is undocumented. E I am glad I picked this book up. I was looking for a book about immigration issue. This one is about what it's like to be undocumented. Mr. Vargas is not Mexican, but Phillipino. I found it interesting detail what it was like. It is interesting to read about living undocumented. As a teen he first learns he is here in US illegally. How he stays hidden, and fears he will get caught. It is interesting that he works as a journalist for the Washington Post out in the open. But, he is undocumented. Even as undocumented he still pays he's taxes. I found Mr. Vargas's novel enlightening. He's memoir is very straight forward and easy to read. Like you are having a conversation with you. If you want to get a bit educated, and understand what it means to be one an American. I recommend if you want to start understanding the hypocrisy.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Serina

    A must read for anyone who is a resident of the U.S., anyone interested in the U.S, and anyone who wants to claim some sense of understanding of the U.S.'s political stance on immigration. Vargas provides a new perspective as an undocumented Filipino immigrant and as a member of the LGBTQA community.

  21. 4 out of 5

    John Garvin

    A good book on the problem that America has with its immigration policy. I did not agree with everything in the book, but it did teach me a lot that I didn't know about immigration. One of the big complaints I have is not with the final version of this book. I have a galley copy. I understand that it is an uncorrected proof of the book. But I have read a lot of galleys, and this one has a ridiculous amount of misspellings, wrong words, or incorrect punctuation. I know I'm not perfect. This post A good book on the problem that America has with its immigration policy. I did not agree with everything in the book, but it did teach me a lot that I didn't know about immigration. One of the big complaints I have is not with the final version of this book. I have a galley copy. I understand that it is an uncorrected proof of the book. But I have read a lot of galleys, and this one has a ridiculous amount of misspellings, wrong words, or incorrect punctuation. I know I'm not perfect. This post is probably fraught with incorrect grammar. But I am not writing a book. Nor am I a professional journalist as this author is. It was just too many for me not to mention.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Erica Lynn

    I devpured this book. Its a beautiful reveal of the true problem with immigration. And I was surprised at how much I really didn't know. Growing up and living in Vermont, as a white natural born citizen, the most exposure I had to the immigration issue was through the migrant farmers and refugee population. After Trump was elected. I slowly saw the familiar faces of the seasonal workers in my hometown start to dwindle. Even in a progressive place like Vermont, I found myself and my neighbors div I devpured this book. Its a beautiful reveal of the true problem with immigration. And I was surprised at how much I really didn't know. Growing up and living in Vermont, as a white natural born citizen, the most exposure I had to the immigration issue was through the migrant farmers and refugee population. After Trump was elected. I slowly saw the familiar faces of the seasonal workers in my hometown start to dwindle. Even in a progressive place like Vermont, I found myself and my neighbors divided by their blind hatred and racism. I would recommend this book to anyone taking a civics course in high school, or even a modern US history class. It's a conversation starter, and it truly captures the question of who is American.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Sharon

    Sad and incredibly infuriating (as I should've known) and a fascinating perspective. I felt the switch from hiding to being ready to reveal came a little too suddenly without quite explaining how he got there, but other than that, an excellent, fast, important read.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Harriet

    Everyone must read this when it comes out in August or September.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Seth

    A story that must be told in days like these. A story so much like many that have similar experiences.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Celine

    "To pass as an American, I always has to question the law. Not just to break it, not just circumvent it, but question it. I had to interrogate how laws are created, how illegality must be seen through the prism of who is defining what is legal for whom. I had to realize that throughout American history, legality has always been a construct of power." A thoughtful and needed look at what it means to be undocumented and the experience that millions of undocumented Americans now face. I appreciated "To pass as an American, I always has to question the law. Not just to break it, not just circumvent it, but question it. I had to interrogate how laws are created, how illegality must be seen through the prism of who is defining what is legal for whom. I had to realize that throughout American history, legality has always been a construct of power." A thoughtful and needed look at what it means to be undocumented and the experience that millions of undocumented Americans now face. I appreciated that Vargas writes from the perspective of a Filipino, a people group incredibly enmeshed in discussions of citizenship and immigration, but one also largely left out of current media discourse on documentation and citizenship rights. His book broadens, and deliberately complicates, the discussion in the most necessary of ways. A great perspective. "Migration is the most natural thing people do, the root of how civilizations, nation-states, and countries were established. The difference, however, is that when white people move, then and now, it's seen as courageous and necessary, celebrated in history books. Yet when people of color move, legally or illegally, the migration itself is subjected to question of legality. Is it a crime? Will they assimilate? When will they stop? There are an estimated 258 million migrants around the world, and many of us are migrating to countries that previously colonized and imperialized us. We have a human right to move, and governments should serve that right, not limit it. The unprecedented movement of people--what some call a 'global migration crisis'--is, in reality, a natural progression of history. Yes, we are here because we believe in the promise of the American Dream--the search for a better life, the challenge of dreaming big. But we are also here because you were there--the cost of American imperialism and globalization, the impact of economic policies and political decisions. During this volatile time in the U.S. and around the world, we need a new language around migration and the meaning of citizenship. Our survival depends on the creation and understanding of this new language."

  27. 5 out of 5

    T

    This was a frustrating read. It was compelling, very well written, and very accessible, but I spent the whole time just mad as hell for Vargas. Much like his NY Times piece, he brings a much-needed human element to the issue of undocumented immigration. He also cites the history and many laws we have put in place that actually created this issue, and why it's not a simple process to "get legal." It is a necessary, important read -- not just to understand what he and other undocumented people hav This was a frustrating read. It was compelling, very well written, and very accessible, but I spent the whole time just mad as hell for Vargas. Much like his NY Times piece, he brings a much-needed human element to the issue of undocumented immigration. He also cites the history and many laws we have put in place that actually created this issue, and why it's not a simple process to "get legal." It is a necessary, important read -- not just to understand what he and other undocumented people have had to sacrifice, but also to understand our part in the narrative. I went into this book steeling myself for something hopelessly depressing (and some parts of it were hopelessly depressing), but I found many, many more instances of people of all races wanting to help him and mentor him and support him in whatever way they could. I also found what might be a cultural commonality -- despite Vargas's family bringing him here for a better life, they continually tried to hold him back out of fear whenever he did the work he was meant to do. And knowing that Vargas has been through what he's been through and still manages to stand up and speak out... all of this gave me hope. I agree with another reviewer that this is a book everyone needs to read. I'm not optimistic that the people who need to read it the most will actually read it, but I will say this. I have always considered myself sympathetic to the plight of undocumented people, like I have vague knowledge on the arbitrariness of how immigration laws have been implemented and I am squarely on their side of the issue. Still, in reading this book, I was surprised by what I didn't know. I didn't know just how much undocumented workers pay into taxes and social security that they will never be able to benefit from. I didn't know that the existing laws have been written so narrowly such that there is actually no path to "getting legal" for Vargas. I learned so much from Vargas's book and am inspired by his strength and courage. Thank you for writing this book.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Tiffany

    Jose Antonio Vargas was born in the Philippines and came to America when he was twelve. When he tried to get his driver’s license at sixteen, he learned that his green card was fake. He was in the US illegally, but chose to keep his status hidden. It was never easy keeping his secrets, however. Jose hated the hiding and the lying. Eventually, he would publicly reveal himself as undocumented. While in high school, Jose discovered journalism. He has worked for the San Francisco Chronicle, the Philad Jose Antonio Vargas was born in the Philippines and came to America when he was twelve. When he tried to get his driver’s license at sixteen, he learned that his green card was fake. He was in the US illegally, but chose to keep his status hidden. It was never easy keeping his secrets, however. Jose hated the hiding and the lying. Eventually, he would publicly reveal himself as undocumented. While in high school, Jose discovered journalism. He has worked for the San Francisco Chronicle, the Philadelphia Daily News, and the Washington Post. As part of a Post team covering the Virginia Tech shootings, Jose won the Pulitzer Prize for Breaking News Reporting. Jose is the founder of Define American, a nonprofit organization that addresses immigration and citizenship. Since coming forward as an undocumented immigrant in 2011, Jose has become an activist for immigration rights. This is such a complicated issue. On one hand, there are those who believe that Jose and people like him should be deported, no questions asked. On the other hand, there are people who believe in a path to citizenship for people like Jose. And on another hand still, there are immigrants who did all the right things: jumped through all the hoops and have the correct papers. But they resent Jose for what they perceive as not playing fair. My take? Jose is an American. This is where he’s lived since he was twelve. He attended school here, he works here, he pays taxes here. He just doesn’t have the right paperwork. Through his work and activism, to me he represents the best of America: the desire to learn, work hard, and make a better life. I can’t fault him for any of that. I’m proud to be a fellow Filipino-American and I’m proud of the important work that Jose continues to do every day.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Kerry

    If you did not believe that the immigration laws in the US urgently need reform, you will after reading this account of a Filipino man who entered this country at the age of 12, sent on a plane (to his grandparents in California) by his mother, thinking she would follow soon. Years later, she remains in the Philippines and her son has become an award-winning American journalist and more recently, a reluctant advocate for those like himself who are existing in a legal limbo. This is a candid and If you did not believe that the immigration laws in the US urgently need reform, you will after reading this account of a Filipino man who entered this country at the age of 12, sent on a plane (to his grandparents in California) by his mother, thinking she would follow soon. Years later, she remains in the Philippines and her son has become an award-winning American journalist and more recently, a reluctant advocate for those like himself who are existing in a legal limbo. This is a candid and emotional account of living in the shadows and the author's anxiety is palpable. He asserts that he is not hiding from the government, but that "the government is hiding from me", a reference to the fact that there is no legal option for him to gain citizenship other than by returning to the Philippines for 10 yrs before applying formally. However, the current president Dutarte has made little secret of his hatred for journalists. In the meantime, Vargas attempts to educate his would-be-fellow Americans about the history and current state of the complex and changeable US naturalization laws. After years of seeking a legal solution to his dilemma, he writes w/a bitterness that borders on resignation. "The truth is, there's a part of me...who is still in that airplane, wondering why Mama put me there."

  30. 5 out of 5

    Kim

    "Dear America, is this what you really want? Do you even know what is happening in your name?" Most of us don't know what is happening in our name. This gorgeously written memoir is an important baby step towards Americans learning about our current deeply broken immigration system and the effects it has on our neighbors, classmates, coworkers, and - in Jose's case - award-winning journalists. This book is a critical inspiration to getting us asking better questions about American immigration hist "Dear America, is this what you really want? Do you even know what is happening in your name?" Most of us don't know what is happening in our name. This gorgeously written memoir is an important baby step towards Americans learning about our current deeply broken immigration system and the effects it has on our neighbors, classmates, coworkers, and - in Jose's case - award-winning journalists. This book is a critical inspiration to getting us asking better questions about American immigration history (our long tradition of racist and ethnic exclusions, including but not limited to the long-standing Chinese Exclusion Act), where quota systems came from and how they are failing, the impossible challenges facing undocumented immigrants in the current system. How do we create paths to citizenship for friends, family and neighbors we recognize as Americans without question until an ICE or border patrol agent asks for proof of citizenship? May we all come away from this book asking that question and reaching out to our representatives at the state and federal level to make life a little easier on our undocumented neighbors.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.