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Fawkes

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Thomas Fawkes is turning to stone, and the only cure to the Stone Plague is to join his father’s plot to assassinate the king of England. Silent wars leave the most carnage. The wars that are never declared, but are carried out in dark alleys with masks and hidden knives. Wars where color power alters the natural rhythm of 17th century London. And when the king calls for pe Thomas Fawkes is turning to stone, and the only cure to the Stone Plague is to join his father’s plot to assassinate the king of England. Silent wars leave the most carnage. The wars that are never declared, but are carried out in dark alleys with masks and hidden knives. Wars where color power alters the natural rhythm of 17th century London. And when the king calls for peace, no one listens until he finally calls for death. But what if death finds him first? Keepers think the Igniters caused the plague. Igniters think the Keepers did. But all Thomas knows is that the Stone Plague infecting his eye is spreading. And if he doesn’t do something soon, he’ll be a lifeless statue. So when his Keeper father, Guy Fawkes, invites him to join the Gunpowder Plot—claiming it will put an end to the plague—Thomas is in. The plan: use 36 barrels of gunpowder to blow up the Igniter King. The problem: Doing so will destroy the family of the girl Thomas loves. But backing out of the plot will send his father and the other plotters to the gallows. To save one, Thomas will lose the other. No matter Thomas’s choice, one thing is clear: once the decision is made and the color masks have been put on, there’s no turning back.


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Thomas Fawkes is turning to stone, and the only cure to the Stone Plague is to join his father’s plot to assassinate the king of England. Silent wars leave the most carnage. The wars that are never declared, but are carried out in dark alleys with masks and hidden knives. Wars where color power alters the natural rhythm of 17th century London. And when the king calls for pe Thomas Fawkes is turning to stone, and the only cure to the Stone Plague is to join his father’s plot to assassinate the king of England. Silent wars leave the most carnage. The wars that are never declared, but are carried out in dark alleys with masks and hidden knives. Wars where color power alters the natural rhythm of 17th century London. And when the king calls for peace, no one listens until he finally calls for death. But what if death finds him first? Keepers think the Igniters caused the plague. Igniters think the Keepers did. But all Thomas knows is that the Stone Plague infecting his eye is spreading. And if he doesn’t do something soon, he’ll be a lifeless statue. So when his Keeper father, Guy Fawkes, invites him to join the Gunpowder Plot—claiming it will put an end to the plague—Thomas is in. The plan: use 36 barrels of gunpowder to blow up the Igniter King. The problem: Doing so will destroy the family of the girl Thomas loves. But backing out of the plot will send his father and the other plotters to the gallows. To save one, Thomas will lose the other. No matter Thomas’s choice, one thing is clear: once the decision is made and the color masks have been put on, there’s no turning back.

30 review for Fawkes

  1. 5 out of 5

    Nadine Brandes

    ARE YOU READY? (Okay can we take a minute to talk about how Goodreads has a "read", "to read", and "currently reading" option...but what about "wrote"? Because just clicking "I read this book" doesn't really capture what me and this book truly went through.) *added later* Per request from several readers, I have included a content guide below: PARENTS'/CONTENT GUIDE This book is recommended for readers ages 14 and up. PROFANITY: None SEXUAL CONTENT: brief kissing VIOLENCE: sword fights, people turni ARE YOU READY? (Okay can we take a minute to talk about how Goodreads has a "read", "to read", and "currently reading" option...but what about "wrote"? Because just clicking "I read this book" doesn't really capture what me and this book truly went through.) *added later* Per request from several readers, I have included a content guide below: PARENTS'/CONTENT GUIDE This book is recommended for readers ages 14 and up. PROFANITY: None SEXUAL CONTENT: brief kissing VIOLENCE: sword fights, people turning to stone due to a magical plague, mention of drawn-and-quartering. At one point a man strikes a woman with his hand. (She strikes him back) Click on "spoiler" to read about scene details: (view spoiler)[ - a character tries to cut the stone plague out of his skin with a knife - a character almost gets hung - there is description of executions (decapitated heads are seen on spikes) - deaths take place in numerous ways: being shot, stone plague, falling a long distance to the ground (non-suicidal), etc. (hide spoiler)] Readers, if I've missed anything, please say so in the comments and I'll add it here. :)

  2. 4 out of 5

    C.G. Drews

    I'm always here for a good bit o' dark magic and assassination plots, so I was really excited to read Fawkes! I also know like NOTHING about the original Guy Fawkes, so this reimagining of London with Guy Fawkes' son as the narrator, and add in a bit of a devastating stone plague and a magic system based on colours?! Well it was great. Also I learned a lot! I mean, apart from the magic. 95% sure the Brits didn't have magic...or did they and hello hOGWARTS' ORIGIN STORY. Mwahahah... okay um yeah, I'm always here for a good bit o' dark magic and assassination plots, so I was really excited to read Fawkes! I also know like NOTHING about the original Guy Fawkes, so this reimagining of London with Guy Fawkes' son as the narrator, and add in a bit of a devastating stone plague and a magic system based on colours?! Well it was great. Also I learned a lot! I mean, apart from the magic. 95% sure the Brits didn't have magic...or did they and hello hOGWARTS' ORIGIN STORY. Mwahahah... okay um yeah, I'll stop. Remember, remember, the fifth of November, The Gunpowder treason and plot; I know of no reason why the Gunpowder treason Should ever be forgot! Guy Fawkes, Guy Fawkes, 'twas his intent To blow up the King adn the Parliment; Threescore barrels of powder below, Poor old England to overthrow. By God's providence he was catch'd, With a dark lantern and a burning match. + It's narrated by 16 year old Thomas Fawkes, who is a hopeless honourable little mite. He is like the ultimate Gyrffindor. HONOUR. GOODNESS. GENTLEMANLY PLEDGES. Giveth me my sword and I shALL DEFEND THE WORLD. He's such a good hearted little dork, look at him go. He also has the magical-stone-plague, which is dormant but he's ostracised because of it. And he's also lost an eye to it. I really like when books feature characters with disabilities and illnesses! (Although I don't like "cure" storylines, but I think this was fair because it was an illness and could kill him so I get that he was desperate for the cure.) And I like how it was that twist on the London Black Plague by making it this magic-infected-illness that slowly turned you to stone. I really felt for Thomas, and there was this one scene....omg...the writing was just vivid with his pain and agony and my hEART LURCHED. (view spoiler)[That part where he nearly dies as the plague comes back and suddenly spreads and he's just having the stone take over his whole face jakfdlsad. It was terrifying. (hide spoiler)] + The magic system was also awesome! It's based on masks and colours! So like my Phantom of the Opera obsessed youth is delighted. Thank you. Basically you can do magic via speaking or commanding certain colours --> but you have to have your mask, made by a parent, to be able to connect with the magic. Thomas' father, Guy Fawkes, ditched him because he thought his kid was going to die of the plague so Thomas is travelling to get his dad to give him his bloody mask. + Do we have father/son issues? Why yes we do. I do so love a book with a complex and intriguing magic system AND FAMILY STRIFE. Thomas trying to figure out if he's onboard with his dad assassinating a king and if that will solve the plague, the war between magicians??? Like I felt for him. + There's quite a big secondary cast. I admit I got all the guys in on the plot confused, haha, except for Catsby because I think people name their actual cats that, but like thinking of Gatsby. Right? ANYWAY. But they were all actually the names of the real people in on Fawke's plot! So that was cool! And I love loooooved Emma! She is a badass young woman from Thomas' school, who's kind of blackmailed into being with this rich family and Thomas has this lITTLE CRUSH. It's such a small but wholesome romance, and definitely doesn't overshadow the plot! So if you're not a super romance fan this would work for you too. But Emma paints, kicks ass, takes names, and has the most vibrant personality in the book I think!! LOVE HER. + There's so many elements to the story too! Gunpowder! Conspiracies! Disguises! Plagues! Discussions on race and the disgusting racism in London. There's like a twist/retelling on the religious wars (but this time with magicians instead of religion!) and THERE IS MURDER. ALL IN ALL: I enjoyed this one! It's not super face paced, but it crafts such a detailed view of London and I am so so in love with the colour-coded magic system (heck I colour-code my LIFE so sign me up). I enjoyed this twist on the original Guy Fawkes and I love how you get torn from both sides on which is good vs bad.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Katie Grace

    If you think the cover is epic, just wait until you read the book. SO GOOD.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Ivana A.

    Blog | Facebook | Twitter | Instagram | Pinterest | Fawkes by Nadine Brandes is one of those books that draws you into a world, enlightens you with its magic, and then sends you back to reality, so you can enlighten others while you glow! Nadine used the history of Guy Fawkes and the failed attempt to blow the parliament as a base to her story, that follows Guy Fawkes’s son, Thomas, into an incredible magical journey. ‘’A foundation of truth represents what life was intended to be.’’ Thomas is Blog | Facebook | Twitter | Instagram | Pinterest | Fawkes by Nadine Brandes is one of those books that draws you into a world, enlightens you with its magic, and then sends you back to reality, so you can enlighten others while you glow! Nadine used the history of Guy Fawkes and the failed attempt to blow the parliament as a base to her story, that follows Guy Fawkes’s son, Thomas, into an incredible magical journey. ‘’A foundation of truth represents what life was intended to be.’’ Thomas is about to get his mask, that is supposed to make him control one colour. He also happens to be affected with the plague, that turns his face into stone. His family are all Keepers, and he, by default is a keeper too. But things are never that simple. What will happen when he might not get his mask, and the plague is about to kill him? We follow the journey of Thomas through a first - person perspective. He feels incomplete when he has the plague, and all his life he is waiting to get his mask, and to be able to control a colour. Any colour, even though he prefers Grey. Only with my mask could I bond with a color. But on the day when he is about to receive his mask from his dad, he learns that his father is in London, and is not willing to come. Scared for his life, and angry at his father, he goes into an adventure to find him. His father is Guy Fawkes, a Keeper that is involved in a Gunpowder plot, which will kill the whole parliament, and most importantly, the king of England, who is the cause of the plague! Thomas joins the plot, knowing that this is the last chance for him to survive the plague! If the king is dead, the plague would be gone. But will it? I never imagined a single moment of acceptance could reverse a year of bitterness and prejudice. Through Thomas’s eyes, we see a war between the Keepers and the Igniters. It might be a metaphor for the Catholics and Protestants, but I won’t go into this now. The Keepers were loyal to one color only, and Igniters wanted to control all colors. Igniters used the White Colour as a source to control all power. But White Color doesn’t obey like other colours do - the White Color makes people go crazy for power and glory. Something similar to the ring in Lord of The Rings. ‘’Igniters believe that for each Keeper that dies, one person is cured of the plague’’. We see Thomas caught between two sides - the keepers want to be free of oppression, and the Igniters want to be free to use color speech as they wanted. On such a crossroad, Thomas wants to find the truth for himself. But there is no time, and not many people that he can trust. ‘’You’ve given me your truth. I have to find it for myself for it to become mine. And curiosity is the first step’’. On his journey, his relationship with Emma becomes stronger. She is an Igniter, and they share different beliefs, and she also knows he has the plague. But she is still around, and she accepts his as he is. And Thomas, taught to always hide his face, because otherwise he would be killed by the Igniters, is able to relax around Emma. This will teach him to accept Emma as she is, once she tells him her secret. I loved the character of Emma. She is a strong person, but unable to show her true self due to the fact that she is not like the others, that she is not the same. In this book it is also shown quite well how women were underestimated in the 17th century. How they were thought to be unworthy. The only bit I didn’t like about Emma is that, even though such strong character, she would have never fought for herself if Thomas wasn’t there to ‘’save’’ her. This book is a lovely story about Thomas, and how he finds his true self, how he is not afraid to stand up for the things he believes in, how he learns that he shouldn't be hiding his true self anymore and embrace his fears, as they might turn out to be the best things that ever happened in his life. ‘’Take a breath, Thomas. There has always been fear. There will always be fear. It’s up to us to stand tall, even when the fear demands we bow to it.’’ So yes, my lovely readers, I loved this book so much! I loved the magical moments, I loved how it turned out to be an amazing plot, based on real history events. I loved Thomas’s character, and I loved Emma. I loved Guy Fawkes as well, especially in the end of the book. If you happen to love these types of books, please get your copy as soon as you can. You won’t regret it at all! I have received a complimentary copy of this book from Thomas Nelson through NetGalley. Opinions expressed in this review are completely my own.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Kelly Brigid

    “Not a single day has been promised to me. Do not deny me this moment.” Firstly, I need to express my admiration for the stunning cover. I’m an absolute cover-judger and I must say that the art work is so alluring! It is what first drew me towards this book, and the synopsis only reinforced my initial desire to dive into the story. With that being said, I’m afraid I didn’t enjoy the book as much as I had hoped. I’m not a huge historical-fiction reader, but a retelling of the Guy Fawkes assass “Not a single day has been promised to me. Do not deny me this moment.” Firstly, I need to express my admiration for the stunning cover. I’m an absolute cover-judger and I must say that the art work is so alluring! It is what first drew me towards this book, and the synopsis only reinforced my initial desire to dive into the story. With that being said, I’m afraid I didn’t enjoy the book as much as I had hoped. I’m not a huge historical-fiction reader, but a retelling of the Guy Fawkes assassination attempt in an intricate, magic-based England? I’m all ears! How Brandes mixed true events with fiction is truly outstanding. If I were to write my review on that aspect alone, I would happily rate Fawkes four or five stars. The story was also a couple hundred pages too long, in my opinion. If the pacing had been faster, and the length, shorter, I might’ve appreciated the story more. However, I simply couldn’t connect with the protagonist, Thomas. He lacked a unique voice, and I found myself struggling to read through his perspective; it was tedious and rather dull. I admire it when characters have strong beliefs, but Thomas was in this constant state of confusion, and it was frustrating because his reasons for abstaining from choosing a side never made sense. His actions were quite immature, and it grew wearisome to read through. His selfishness and incessant complaining didn’t make me like him any more either. I had also hoped that the relationships with each of the plotters were expressed in greater detail. Aside from their names (all of which belong to true historical figures), there wasn’t anything wholly stimulating about them. On the other hand, the chief villain was entertaining. Predictable as he might’ve been, I still enjoyed his gradual development. The relationship between Thomas and Guy Fawkes had so much potential that was never tapped on. I love relationships between parents and kids and the possibilities for a bond between these two were endless. His father could’ve expressed a plethora of feelings after abandoning Thomas. Perhaps it was too painful to look upon the face of his son who is dying of the same curse that stole his wife? Maybe he couldn’t bear the thought of his only son not being able to forgive him for leaving? He could’ve been frightened of involving Thomas in the dangerous plot that could truly end his life. While a few of these were vaguely shown, it wasn’t depicted as intricately as I hoped it would be. How color powers work was another pressing issue for me. I love the idea of the color powers, and the Stone Plague. While the latter’s origin was eventually explained thoroughly, the former never had such luck. It’s never truly made clear how color powers work and what their practicalities are in the world. From what I’ve gathered, each color is capable of bestowing its user control over a particular element or aspect of nature. How strongly the color forms a bond with the individual, determines the extent of power one can possess. Now, my concern, is what are the types of powers each color grants? Grey controls stone, black controls shadows, – or at least, I think it does – and brown controls dirt and soil. It isn’t described what other colors, such as purple, blue, pink, etc. can do. I also wish there was more details as to what each color can contribute to society. How does it affect employment in the 17th century, for instance? My main fault is that I expected too much from the story. It’s a solid novel, and even though I didn’t enjoy it too much, I can see why many others have given it positive reviews. If you’re a fan of historical fiction and magic, this might be your cup of tea, but be warned that the protagonist can be quite irritable at times, and the relationships aren’t very developed. I received an ARC from the publisher in exchange for an honest review! Blog | Instagram | Twitter | Bloglovin

  6. 4 out of 5

    Jill Williamson

    I loved it. This is a brilliant book that fulfills every expectation. Brandes turns 17th century London into a magical place. I was captivated by the allegory of her magic system and how she blended that fantasy with history. I highly recommend this gripping and beautifully crafted book to all as it will leave you both entertained and pondering matters raised in the storyline long after you’ve finished reading.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Serethiel

    *flails* IT HAS A TITLE. IT HAS A COVER. IT HAS A SYNOPSIS. IT HAS A RELEASE DATE. I NEED FAWKES NOW.

  8. 4 out of 5

    R.F. Gammon

    Okay, so first of all, a MASSIVE thank you to Netgalley for giving me an ARC of this book!!!!! Now let's talk review. Wow! I read the Out of Time series not long before blasting through Fawkes, and while they're both very different (and I think that in general I liked OoT a little better) they both have a distinctive Nadine feel to them. So that was really awesome. The premise of this book is the Gunpowder plot, a real event in England in the early 1600s where a group of plotters discontent with t Okay, so first of all, a MASSIVE thank you to Netgalley for giving me an ARC of this book!!!!! Now let's talk review. Wow! I read the Out of Time series not long before blasting through Fawkes, and while they're both very different (and I think that in general I liked OoT a little better) they both have a distinctive Nadine feel to them. So that was really awesome. The premise of this book is the Gunpowder plot, a real event in England in the early 1600s where a group of plotters discontent with the king (he was a Protestant; they were Catholic; the Protestant church at that time did shameful thing to Catholics.) Guy Fawkes was one of the leaders of that plot, and November 5th in England bears his name. If you don't know anything about the Gunpowder Plot, don't look it up before you read this book. I, I'm afraid, knew a little bit about it, so some of what happened didn't come as a surprise. But! It was still a great book!!!! LIKES -Guy Fawkes himself. Like just HOLY WOW. Talk about the complex dad character. You kind of have to read the thing to know exactly how awesome he is, and his character arc...man, this is my kind of character. -EMMA. I can't really say anything about her because SPOILERS HAHA HER EXISTENCE IS A SPOILER but still. I loved her so much. <33333 -The fact that the real plotters were the characters of this book! -While there's both Keepers (the side Thomas and his father are on) and Igniters (the side Emma and her family are on) within this story, both are portrayed as having major faults and not being totally in the right OR the wrong. Keepers are a persecuted minority, and Thomas and his father fight for them, but Brandes still shows that there are fundamental flaws with them that cannot be explained away simply because they're the minority. Igniters are in power and technically, supposedly, in the right, but their method of holding onto power and the way they torment anyone different is not once depicted as a good thing. Which I LOVED. Both sides were wrong, but neither side was TOTALLY wrong. This made it complicated. And I loved that. -Just the whole historical fantasy aspect. That was so cool. -The color masks/powers! I found that whole concept amazing. -THE VILLAIN. I will not tell you who it was or anything about them...but holy cow it was so so neat when VILLAIN is revealed and I just start shrieking. Heh heh...I totally didn't scream in the middle of the doctor's office or anything like that.... DISLIKES -So, Thomas himself really was whiny and selfish for a long time? He does have some character development, but since this is a standalone where there's already a TON happening he doesn't get a ton. I didn't HATE him...I just didn't love him, either. -The whole White Light thing just kind of weirded me out a bit. (view spoiler)[So, I know that the Keepers are supposed to stand in for Catholics and Igniters for Protestants, but because of that I kept thinking that eventually the White Light was going to be revealed as the Holy Spirit. Which was kind of happening, but I just wasn't feeling it...something about it was weird. Especially how sassy it was. I'm sure it's just that my expectations and the fantasy side of things collided, but it was weird, especially since Thomas and the others have to basically find salvation by coming to the White Light. (hide spoiler)] This is probably just a matter of taste, in all honesty, but it was still a little weird to me. -The book was a TEENSY bit slow in the middle. All in all, four stars, and I definitely recommend this one! Thanks again to Netgalley for providing a free copy! All opinions are my own.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Mary Weber

    Fantastic.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Lindsey (Books for Christian Girls)

    About this book: “Thomas Fawkes is turning to stone, and the only cure to the Stone Plague is to join his father’s plot to assassinate the king of England. Silent wars leave the most carnage. The wars that are never declared, but are carried out in dark alleys with masks and hidden knives. Wars where color power alters the natural rhythm of 17th century London. And when the king calls for peace, no one listens until he finally calls for death. But what if death finds him first? Keepers think the About this book: “Thomas Fawkes is turning to stone, and the only cure to the Stone Plague is to join his father’s plot to assassinate the king of England. Silent wars leave the most carnage. The wars that are never declared, but are carried out in dark alleys with masks and hidden knives. Wars where color power alters the natural rhythm of 17th century London. And when the king calls for peace, no one listens until he finally calls for death. But what if death finds him first? Keepers think the Igniters caused the plague. Igniters think the Keepers did. But all Thomas knows is that the Stone Plague infecting his eye is spreading. And if he doesn’t do something soon, he’ll be a lifeless statue. So when his Keeper father, Guy Fawkes, invites him to join the Gunpowder Plot—claiming it will put an end to the plague—Thomas is in. The plan: use 36 barrels of gunpowder to blow up the Igniter King. The problem: Doing so will destroy the family of the girl Thomas loves. But backing out of the plot will send his father and the other plotters to the gallows. To save one, Thomas will lose the other. No matter Thomas’s choice, one thing is clear: once the decision is made and the color masks have been put on, there’s no turning back.” Series: No. Spiritual Content- Mentions of prayers & praying; Mentions of cathedrals & churches; Mentions of a school named after a saint; Mentions of Christmas (though not the reason for the celebrating); A few mentions of blessings & being blessed; A couple mentions of God; A mention of a miracle; *Note: “Home sweet hell” is said once; Mentions of someone likening himself to a god & someone resembling God’s divine power on earth; A few mentions of people believing dark skin is of the devil & evil; A mention of someone sounding cursed. Negative Content- Minor cussing including: a ‘curse *name*’, an ‘idiot’, two ‘stinking’s, two ‘what in Thames’ name’s, twelve forms of ‘blast it all’, and twenty-five forms of ‘blast’; A couple mentions of curses (said, not written); A bit of sarcasm & sass; Fighting, Injuries, Blood/Bleeding, Cutting one’s own self, & Pain (up to semi-detailed); Thomas is hit & put in jail; Thomas faces prejudice for having the plague; Seeing a handful of hangings, near hangings, those fixing to be hung, people being cut, blood/bleeding, & mockers (up to semi-detailed); Seeing a group of people drown (barely-above-not-detailed); Seeing fights, people shot and dying/die, & blood/bleeding (up to semi-detailed); All about mentions of a plan to assassinate the king and government & kidnap a child; Many mentions of exiles, being hunted, hangings, beheadings, awful death sentences, executions/murders, & treason; Mentions of past hangings, dead bodies, those set for execution, blood/bleeding, tarring, & torture (up to semi-detailed); Mentions of a massacre & blood (up to semi-detailed); Mentions of a death through stoning (barely-above-not-detailed); Mentions of a fire, drownings, & deaths (barely-above-not-detailed); Mentions of duels & killing; Mentions of deaths from a plague; Mentions of being hit, slapped/slapping, nearly being stabbed, injuries, blood/bleeding, & pain (barely-above-not-detailed); Mentions of fights, fighting, & blood (up to semi-detailed); Mentions of prison, inmates/criminals, & the smell of blood; Mentions of thieves, stealing, & crimes; Mentions of wars; Mentions of slavery, slaves, & people being captured and sold; Mentions of hatred & threats; Mentions of lies & lying; Mentions of gossip & rumors; Mentions of prejudice & comments that Thomas faces; Mentions of alcohol, drinking, & drunks; Mentions of animals dying from the plague; Mentions of hunting animals & trips; A few mentions of animals & blood at a butcher’s (up to semi-detailed): A few mentions of whips & whipping animals; A few mentions of animal and human waste & stench; A couple mentions of poison; A couple mentions of blackmail; A couple mentions of gambling; A couple mentions of pipes & tobacco. Sexual Content- a semi-detailed kiss; A few touches & embraces (barely-above-not-detailed); Some noticing; Mentions of flirting, a blown kiss, & hand kisses; A couple mentions of a kiss & kissing; A mention of a young man forcing himself upon a girl & castration (did not happened); A mention of a carnal lover; A mention of a concubine; A bit of love, falling in love, & the emotions; *Note: A few mentions of a man having two wives & him abandoning the first; A few mentions of nakedness; A mention of women showing cleavage; A mention of a boot to a rear-end. -Thomas Fawkes, age 16-17 1st person P.O.V. of Thomas Set in 1604-1606 (Fantasy) 448 pages ~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~* Pre Teens- One Star New Teens- One Star Early High School Teens- Two Stars (and a half) Older High School Teens- Three Stars (and a half) My personal Rating- Three Stars (and a half) {Not for those sensitive to hangings or magic.} If there’s one author I hear a lot about on the bookish Instagram community (especially the Christian fiction branch), it’s Nadine Brandes. While I’ve followed her account for a while now, this was my first time reading one of her books. Thoughts on “Fawkes”? Hang on a second, we’ll get there. In the first couple of chapters of starting this novel, I decided to look into the actual Gunpowder plot of 1605. After reading the Wikipedia page, my only thoughts were, “This isn’t going to end well.” I’ve said many times before that I’m truly not a fantasy fan and was honestly worried if I would be able to keep up with this mix of historical and fantasy plot. Not to mention the fact that this novel is four-hundred and forty-eight pages long. I’m proud to say that I was able to follow along well as nothing seemed too confusing; props to the author on that note. I do believe that I was able to understand the fantasy elements of this one more due to the author sharing behind the scenes and information about the masks on Instagram. The original Gunpowder plot was based on religions while this one was based on the masks and powers of those in the society. A reader who knows the actual history could read into and possibly put in them names of the actual groups that were fighting each other while reading this novel. That aside, “Fawkes” did not have any true Spiritual Content, which while I wasn’t shocked over the fact, I was a bit disappointed. It seems the true history does have the faith and Christian content in it, however. Overall, this novel was cleaner than I was expecting due to the plot to assassinate a king and government. There were still hangings, blood, and fighting, but nothing went over semi-detailed, which I really appreciated. Some families who follow this site might prefer not to read books with magic, so this would be one to stay away from. No witchcraft type magic, but there are those who abuse their powers. I personally found “Fawkes” to be a unique plot and I enjoyed parts of it (especially Emma). I hope to read the author’s next book releasing next May, but I do hope it’ll have more faith content than this one. :) Link to review: https://booksforchristiangirls.blogsp... *BFCG may (Read the review to see) recommend this book by this author. It does not mean I recommend all the books by this author. *I received this book for free from the Publisher (Thomas Nelson) for this honest review.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Jane Maree

    Fawkes is a Historical Fantasy retelling of the Gunpowder Plot, from the perspective of Thomas--Guy Fawkes' teenage son. It follows his struggles and journey as he becomes part of this plot to kill the king and rid England of the terrible Stone Plague. The very plague that Thomas himself is slowly dying from.   I'm an avid reader of anything Nadine Brandes writes, and I had high expectations coming to this book. Fawkes stood up to each expectation and absolutely hooked me in from the very beginnin Fawkes is a Historical Fantasy retelling of the Gunpowder Plot, from the perspective of Thomas--Guy Fawkes' teenage son. It follows his struggles and journey as he becomes part of this plot to kill the king and rid England of the terrible Stone Plague. The very plague that Thomas himself is slowly dying from.   I'm an avid reader of anything Nadine Brandes writes, and I had high expectations coming to this book. Fawkes stood up to each expectation and absolutely hooked me in from the very beginning. This is very different than the Out of Time series (also by Nadine Brandes), but I liked it just as much. It's difficult to compare the books since they're so different---so don't come to Fawkes thinking it's going to be like A Time to Die. It's completely different, and a totally new style, but I still absolutely enjoyed it.   Each of the characters were stunningly crafted. They had their own personality and motivations. All the characters were very realistic and each added an important element to the story and the theme. Thomas's struggles were so real and his voice drew me into the story. Obviously, he started off as a very flawed character, but that just leads to even stronger and deeper character development through the book. I was engaged in his story right from the beginning. Emma was an amazing character. Her determination and spirit was so beautiful. She wasn't defenseless at all, but she was also still feminine at the same time and that was wonderful to see in the world of modern YA fiction that says female characters cannot possibly be physically weak. Her journey was amazing to follow and I just really loved her inner strength and courageousness.   The plot followed the gunpowder assassination plan, but it revolved a lot more around Thomas's personal development than the external conflict---though the external was certainly there as well. Internal growth and struggles always pull me in deeper to the story and I was really feeling everything that Thomas was going through. I read the almost the entire second half of this book in one sitting because it was just so. absolutely. crazy. The tension rose with every chapter and kept me hooked to each page. Not only was there a heap of external struggles, there was so much internal dilemmas on Thomas's part and it drew my heart into the story so deeply.   I could really feel Nadine's heart in this novel, and that made every part of this book hugely impactful. I actually cried twice while reading this, and certainly giggled several other times. Everything about it just drew me in so I could experience the story so closely and so personally.   Content: There was some slightly more gruesome scenes, but I wouldn't say it was any worse than A Time to Die (for example), and it was described enough, but not too much. Probably a 13+ read.   There are so many other things I liked about this book. The depth and complexity of Guy Fawkes's character. The stunning magic system. The allegory echo between the magic and religion. The themes, oh my word. But if I tried to talk about everything this review would be way too massive.   I definitely recommend this breathtaking book! Don't come to it expecting a normal historical fiction, or a normal fantasy book. It's absolutely unique and most certainly worth the time it takes to read. If you think the cover looks amazing, just wait until you see what's inside.   NOTE: I received a free e-ARC of this book from BookLook Bloggers in exchange for my honest review.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Hayden

    Originally, Fawkes was not a book I thought I would be interested in reading. Though historical fantasy sounds good to me in theory, it's always been hard for me to get past the meddling in history that the genre requires. However, in more recent years (and strangely enough, the more I learn about history) the less concerned I've been with this. Case in point: My Lady Jane. A few misgivings aside, I thought it was a hilarious and impossibly charming historical fantasy. Fawkes, therefore, suddenly Originally, Fawkes was not a book I thought I would be interested in reading. Though historical fantasy sounds good to me in theory, it's always been hard for me to get past the meddling in history that the genre requires. However, in more recent years (and strangely enough, the more I learn about history) the less concerned I've been with this. Case in point: My Lady Jane. A few misgivings aside, I thought it was a hilarious and impossibly charming historical fantasy. Fawkes, therefore, suddenly looked a lot more appealing, even if I couldn't help a little bit of wariness as I started it. But truth to be told, I really enjoyed it. I liked how the magical elements were handled, and how they worked within the historical context Although, full disclosure...my Protestant self was satisfied by the outcome; Catholics might not be as pleased (?) The book started out a little slow for me, but it really picked up at the end and sucked me in. Anyway, I wasn't sure what to expect with Fawkes, but I'm glad I risked trying it. I also noticed that Nadine Brandes's next book is Romanov...and while I wasn't planning on reading that one before, I definitely am now. (What can I say? It's a fantasy retelling of Anastasia's story. I hope Ms. Brandes keeps this up- I'm curious what other fantastical historical events we might get from her!) I received this book for free from the publisher in exchange for my honest review.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Roobie

    ⭐4 stars⭐ There has always been fear. There will always be fear. It's up to us to stand tall, even when the fear demands we bow to it. I reeeeeally enjoyed this! It was a tiny bit slow at times and I didn't really care for Thomas (he was kinda selfish and whiny) but I loved the rest of the characters and the story was awesome. The historical fantasy aspect was great and I loved the masks, the colour powers and the fact that Guy Fawkes and the plotters were actually in the book. Also, EMMA IS MY ⭐4 stars⭐ There has always been fear. There will always be fear. It's up to us to stand tall, even when the fear demands we bow to it. I reeeeeally enjoyed this! It was a tiny bit slow at times and I didn't really care for Thomas (he was kinda selfish and whiny) but I loved the rest of the characters and the story was awesome. The historical fantasy aspect was great and I loved the masks, the colour powers and the fact that Guy Fawkes and the plotters were actually in the book. Also, EMMA IS MY QUEEN! I just loved this girl she was amazing! ★I received a complimentary copy of this book from Thomas Nelson through NetGalley. Opinions expressed in this review are completely my own.★

  14. 4 out of 5

    Atlas

    Safety is an illusion, Thomas Fawkes * * * 3 / 5 I loved the premise of Fawkes: historical British fiction with a fantasy element. Thomas Fawkes is the (invented?) son of Guy Fawkes but added into this classic story of gunpowder and treason and plot is a really innovative magic system. But on the downside, this was a very long and slow read for the length. Hadn’t I always dreamed of being her knight? Saving the day? Only I’d saved nothing. She’d been her own knight and I’d stood by like a gaping spe Safety is an illusion, Thomas Fawkes * * * 3 / 5 I loved the premise of Fawkes: historical British fiction with a fantasy element. Thomas Fawkes is the (invented?) son of Guy Fawkes but added into this classic story of gunpowder and treason and plot is a really innovative magic system. But on the downside, this was a very long and slow read for the length. Hadn’t I always dreamed of being her knight? Saving the day? Only I’d saved nothing. She’d been her own knight and I’d stood by like a gaping spectator Like any good English child, what I really know about Guy Fawkes is that which we tell around our yearly bonfire and sing-a-long. Obviously I knew how it was going to end, but I wasn’t all that clear on the details. I’m reasonably sure that a lot of the characters were lifted from history, which was cool – I’m not a massive historical fiction reader, so I really dug recognising all the little nods to history. Who isn’t from history (I don’t think)? Thomas Fawkes, a guy with complex father issues, a girl he’s loved from afar for years but who is essentially engaged, and who is stuck in the middle of a conflict tearing the country apart. So we’ve covered the historical element, but what about the fantasy one? Parents carve their children a mask and when they become of age, the child wears the mask and bonds with a colour power. What does this mean? I’m still not exactly certain, but Keepers only bond with one colour – so if someone bonds with red then they can control things that are red – whilst Igniters have varying degrees of control over all the colours. Keepers think this is the cause of the Stone Plague – the Great Plague that instead of killing people slowly turns them to stone. Did murder ever free anyone? This plot was a revolution built on corpses. It wasn’t how things were supposed to be Fawkes was definitely imaginative, no doubt about it. I loved the mix of real history with magic. But there are so many people in this book, so much going on between Thomas, the romance, the Gunpowder plot, trying to understand the magic and the cause of the conflict. I wanted to savour the complexities, but Fawkes ended up being more confusing and head-scratching than engaging. This made it quite put-down-able and took me a while to finish. I would definitely recommend Fawkes to the YA and fantasy readers wanting to tentatively dip their toes into the waters of historical fiction. But the book was a bit weak in terms of pacing. My thanks to Netgalley, the publisher, and the author for an ARC of this book. Read this review and more on my blog: atlasrisingbooks.wordpress.com/2018/0...

  15. 4 out of 5

    m a r y l i z

    WHAT. JUST. HAPPENED. I'm going to need time to recover, my friends. Just . . . my mind is blown. L I K E S: - The characters were kind of phenomenal. It's been a long time since I've read about characters who completely stole my heart. THEY WERE AMAZING. I expected to dislike Thomas, especially since (spoiler alert :P) he's really selfish at first. But personally? I thought he was extremely relatable and human, and he had one of the greatest character arcs I've witnessed in a while. Is he selfish WHAT. JUST. HAPPENED. I'm going to need time to recover, my friends. Just . . . my mind is blown. L I K E S: - The characters were kind of phenomenal. It's been a long time since I've read about characters who completely stole my heart. THEY WERE AMAZING. I expected to dislike Thomas, especially since (spoiler alert :P) he's really selfish at first. But personally? I thought he was extremely relatable and human, and he had one of the greatest character arcs I've witnessed in a while. Is he selfish and sometimes a little dense? Yes. He is. However, he grows so much over the course of this book and is a character that I can 100% root for. I wanted him to get his mask and restore his relationship with his father. I WANTED HIM TO SUCCEED. Then we have Emma. OH MY STARS, THIS GIRL. She was a firecracker with a heart of gold. I'm literally so inspired by her. She was strong but (thank goodness) not one of those "strong female characters" who think the definition of strength is having no emotions or femininity. I've got news for you, YA writers - you can be strong AND feminine AND compassionate. Emma is living proof of that. Her heart for others and passion to make the world a better place were so admirable. The world needs more people like Emma. <3 (I want to say more about this amazing gal but #SPOILERS. xD) And the plotters? OH BOY. They were all so complex! I can't get enough of Nadine's complex characters, you guys. Not one of them was flat. I especially loved jolly, red-bearded Keyes (wish I had seen more of him); the kind-hearted and logical Wintour; and of course, the ever-mysterious and guarded Guy Fawkes. His character arc and relationship with Thomas about DESTROYED ME. That's all I'm saying here. *cough* - The plot. Ummm, can you say BRILLIANT?? The synopsis itself was intriguing enough to convince me to read this. There were amaaaazing plot twists (WHICH ARE SPOILERY AGH), and the blend of historical + fantasy? WOWZA. I think I've found a new favorite genre. The Gunpowder Plot itself was just really fascinating! There were so many secrets and tons of suspense. It about killed me. xD - The setting. I. AM. FLOORED. The research that went into Fawkes is nothing short of jaw-dropping. It made this book come alive. I mean . . . 17th century London with magic?? SIGN ME UP. I fell in love with the setting (and determined that I would have lasted a whole of .5 seconds there, lol). It had such a shadowy and gritty aesthetic, never afraid to shy away from the unpleasant details (like the disease + terrible hygiene of that time period). And yet . . . it was bustling with life and energy. I kind of adored the setting. - THE MAGIC SYSTEM OMW. I was a bit wary coming in since my thoughts on magic are a bit on-the-fence. However, any expectations I had were blown COMPLETELY away! I've never read a book that had such a compelling and interesting magic system. NO JOKE, GUYS. Everything you've heard about it is true. The masks and the color powers were soooooo creative & ingenious. And personally, I didn't have any issues with the magic itself. (And I'm pretty conservative, haha.) I loved the limitations that the powers had and the fact that people "bonded" with specific colors. It was absolutely phenomenal. ALL THE APPLAUSE FOR NADINE. - The writing style. Wowowow. Teach me how to write like Nadine, please and thank you. Thomas had such a unique character voice, and I was pleasantly surprised with how much I connected to him, especially since he's a guy. (Huzzah for YA fiction with male POVs!) - Literally just alllll the relationships and complex motivations. The father-son dynamic, conflicting & complex motivations, moral struggles . . . I AM SHOOK. This is the kind of quality storytelling that I signed up for! D I S L I K E S: - White Light. Hm, okay. So the whole White Light thing kind of bothered me. If I separated it from reality and just tried to view it as part of the magic system, I was okay with it. However, I think it's supposed to be a representation of God and I just . . . wasn't comfortable with the way God was presented. White Light was sassy and annoying and seemed to be toying with people quite a bit . . . which feels very irreverent to me. Yes, God has a sense of humor; but he doesn't give us conflicting advice or "mess with us." I felt pretty unsettled with this representation of God. It showed Him as being kind of like a mischievous imp who was purposely trying to "fool around" with all the control he had. Just my personal opinion! - (view spoiler)[I feel rather bothered by the fact that Thomas converted and supposedly THAT was the reason he was a better person in the end. I'm not even Catholic, guys, but I have Catholic friends. And I didn't appreciate the fact that, though the author hinted at the validity of both sides, she seemed to say that BECAUSE Thomas converted, he was better than he had been as a Keeper (aka Catholic). Now, maybe she wasn't saying that. This might just be my perception. Because honestly, Nadine is SUCH a sweet person and I believe she genuinely loves all her readers, whether Catholic or Protestant or whatever. I just personally was a little unsettled by the way Thomas's conversion was handled and shown. (hide spoiler)] So did I like this book? DEFINITELY. It was for once a book actually worth the hype. But did I fall in love with it the way I hoped? Sadly . . . not quite. My issues with it were large enough that I can't give it a higher rating. However, I can definitely foresee reading this in the future! As you can see, there were a lot of things I loved about it. ;) 4 stars

  16. 4 out of 5

    Cesar

    2.75 stars. Historical fiction has always fascinated me in the sense that I am reading a story that takes place hundreds of years ago. I get to read about how people lived back then, important historical dates and figures, as well as learning something new. Add in elements of fantasy to them and it makes the reading all the more fun. You'd never expect to see magic in a story that takes place in 18th century USA or in 14th century Asia. Any time in history is fun to read about. Fawkes (Which is da 2.75 stars. Historical fiction has always fascinated me in the sense that I am reading a story that takes place hundreds of years ago. I get to read about how people lived back then, important historical dates and figures, as well as learning something new. Add in elements of fantasy to them and it makes the reading all the more fun. You'd never expect to see magic in a story that takes place in 18th century USA or in 14th century Asia. Any time in history is fun to read about. Fawkes (Which is dangerously close to the word fu-) is a perfect example of historical fiction with fantasy elements in it. But was it a fun book? Kind of? After some thinking, I've come to the conclusion that Fawkes, while not a bad book, was just not that good and didn't live up to the expectations I had. Fawkes is a historical fiction story based on the actual events of the assassination of King James using gunpowder. (Don't look it up if you don't want to get spoiled. Seriously.) Our main character Thomas is plagued with an illness that will slowly turn his body into stone. When he doesn't get his masl (something I'll get into later) he sets out to find his father and get his mask. He's then enlisted in the assassination plot to kill King James and rid England of the plague. But Thomas has doubts about it as he discovers secrets about the Igniters and Keepers while also developing feelings for Emma, a girl who may get killed in the assassination. Fawkes is an ambitious story that entices its readers with historical events and magic. However, I was let down by all the potential that seemed to be going everywhere and nowhere at the same time. As ambitious as it tried to be, it was shot down by flaws. It wasn't a bad experience, but that same experience wasn't exactly bright or fun. I'll start off with the positives and say that I liked the setting as well as the magic system. Historical fiction is a genre I want to read more of because I just love reading about different time periods and learning more about the history as well as the people and how society acted. History can be enticing and scary when you learn more about past events. What I liked about Fawkes was that the author did her research and presented a story with a unique twist on magic and it was so much fun. The magic system wasn't confusing or that complicated (to me, at least) and it was fun to learn more about using magic through masks and the power dynamics of who should and shouldn't use magic. The rundown of the magic is that people can call out to colors (blue, red, green, etc.) and when they connect to a certain color, they get abilities relating to that color. There's also something called White Color where it means you can control multiple colors at once and that is a big no-no. Then we have Emma, my favorite character out of all the others. She's smart, kickass, and doesn't let anyone hold her down. When Thomas is being a complete idiot, Emma's the one who takes his head out of his ass and rips him a new one. She's so amazing and wonderful. (view spoiler)[It is revealed in the middle of the book that she is African American and has been in disguise. She's straightforward about the mistreatment of Africans and struggles to live in a world that would ignore her because of her skin color. Thomas tries to help but Emma tells him that it isn't that simple, that he has no idea what she has to go through as an African and as a woman. Still, she has dreams and aspirations she wants to follow and she will not let anyone get in her way. She is an amazing character (hide spoiler)] Positives aside, I did have some issues. The first being Thomas. Thomas is a bland character that has nothing going for him other than wanting to get his damn mask, being whiny, and can't seem to think for himself. In this universe, masks are used to channel magic and parents make masks for their children once they learn how to control a certain color. Thomas doesn't get to pass his color test and is hellbent on getting his father to make him a mask and holy crap he was so freaking annoying. The first half he wouldn't shut up about his mask and whining to his father about it and it was just bad. There's nothing about him that stands out because aside from being part of the assassination plot and wanting his mask, he's just your boring plain joe. Had he been interesting or have a much better personality, I might've liked him. Then there's the issue of Thomas' involvement with the rebellion and magic. Thomas has been told that using multiple colors is bad and he's all for it, never questioning or doubting the people who have told him that. When he's exposed to people who can control multiple colors, he's so quick to judge them. Thomas is a character who doesn't have enough backbone to come up with his own thoughts and lets others do it for him. He is a weak character. We have Guy Fawkes, Thomas' dad and he is nothing but a deadbeat father. That's all he is throughout the story. This is the guy who completely abandons his son for a good chunk of his life and when Thomas does find him, he doesn't even try to get to know him. All he cares about is the assassination plot. Here's your Dad of the Year buddy, way to fucking go. 🏆 The pacing of the story is another issue that kind-of-sort-of resolves near the end but sometimes the story slowed and while I do love reading about the setting, I do want more focus on the plot and characters (despite how bland they were). Verdict Fawkes was a decent story. It did have ambition, but was muddled down with issues. Not a bad book, but nothing extraordinary. Thanks for reading my review! -Cesar

  17. 4 out of 5

    Galaxy Adventurer

    Imagine a world where a mask gives you the ability to communicate with colors and move items of that color. Now imagine that in 17th century London with a cruel king and two different groups wanting the other gone. Now add a plot for the Keepers to take over the government by assassinating the Igniter king. Finally add a dash of mystery and romance. Put that all together and you have Fawkes! This truly was a very interesting story. The world is so much fun(where can I buy a color mask? Cause I need Imagine a world where a mask gives you the ability to communicate with colors and move items of that color. Now imagine that in 17th century London with a cruel king and two different groups wanting the other gone. Now add a plot for the Keepers to take over the government by assassinating the Igniter king. Finally add a dash of mystery and romance. Put that all together and you have Fawkes! This truly was a very interesting story. The world is so much fun(where can I buy a color mask? Cause I need one). Also the descriptions of the places in this book just *heart eyes* (Also, gonna need a way to get to a masquerade ball, cause that would be fabulous <3 ) It also makes you wonder who the real bad guys are. Is it the keepers or igniters? Or is there really a bad group, or just some bad people? It did get a little slow towards the middle of the book, but it picked up quickly in the latter half. Most of the plot twists didn't surprise me, but one that did was the cause of the stone plague. Speaking of the stone plague, I'M GLAD THAT'S NOT REAL CAUSE IT SOUNDS AWFUL. TURNING TO STONE? Now time to talk about some of the characters :) Our main character Thomas was fabulous. While he could be a bit repetitive at times, his growth through this story was amazing. He carved his own path and found who he was, not who others told him to be. Emma had to be my favorite though. She was so strong and was ready to fight for what is right. She is so amazing. Guy Fawkes, aka Thomas's dad, I'm still not sure how I feel about him. Overall his character was good, and I did like him at the end, but some things he did during the story were not ok. The White Light, is it good? Is it bad? You will have to read and decide for yourself ;) Some of the side characters felt a little flat, but they were still fun. This was such a beautiful and fun story to read, and the ending left me happy ~keep reading & keep exploring galaxies~ (I received an eARC from Netgalley in return for an honest review)

  18. 4 out of 5

    Cindy ✩☽ Savage Queen ♔

    Just got approved for this on NetGalley!

  19. 5 out of 5

    Iryna (Book and Sword)

    2/5 stars Sadly this is a DNF for me. It boggles my mind how a book that supposedly has everything I love in books ended up being the book that I didn't love. Historical fiction? - check! Beautiful cover? - check! Magic woven into history? - check! YA book that doesn't have any unnecessary and annoying sex scenes? - check! The execution of all of those things together? - ehhh... I honestly don't know what, or even how that happened? The premise seemed so promising. The cover obviously caught my cove 2/5 stars Sadly this is a DNF for me. It boggles my mind how a book that supposedly has everything I love in books ended up being the book that I didn't love. Historical fiction? - check! Beautiful cover? - check! Magic woven into history? - check! YA book that doesn't have any unnecessary and annoying sex scenes? - check! The execution of all of those things together? - ehhh... I honestly don't know what, or even how that happened? The premise seemed so promising. The cover obviously caught my cover-whore loving eye. But from the very first pages I was very uninterested, and to be honest, pretty bored. For starters the story drops us into the historical setting of Guy Fawkes' son and into the era in which Guy Fawkes was famous for something. Who is Guy Fawkes? What did he actually do? I have absolutely no idea - my point is that if the reader is not already familiar with history of that era - will be just as lost as I was. And probably uninterested, because if guy Fawkes had any significance, I didn't know it, thus I really didn't care for his character. Hi son, Thomas, and our main character was the most bland, whiny and illogical character ever. Emma is honestly the only character that had any potential. The plot wasn't holding my attention at all, but the biggest mess of this book was "the magic system". ​Is I tried to explain "the magic" - I couldn't. Because it wasn't explained in the book. The ideas, the premises were so good, so much potential! But in the end it was just too much, or too little? Too undefined, too underdeveloped - just messy. My disappointment in this book is quite sad - when I got approved for my request for it I literally squealed with glee because I was so excited for it. But, alas. Big thanks to NetGalley and THOMAS- Nelson Fiction for my e-ARC for a review. All of the opinions are mine, honest and come from the heart. *Read in 2018 My WEBSITE My INSTAGRAM My WORDPRESS BLOG

  20. 4 out of 5

    Rachel McMillan

    A work of staggering and ineffable imagination, Fawkes bursts like a kaleidoscope of gunpowder and colour blasting a perfectly rendered London with indelible aplomb. An endearing and all too fallible hero shoves away his famous father's shadow to become the hero of the moment. Dizzying and immensely gratifying, Fawkes balances romance, redemption, friendship and sacrifice in a brilliantly evocative way. My brain hurt in the best way at the complicated threads of this tapestry and in a lesser voic A work of staggering and ineffable imagination, Fawkes bursts like a kaleidoscope of gunpowder and colour blasting a perfectly rendered London with indelible aplomb. An endearing and all too fallible hero shoves away his famous father's shadow to become the hero of the moment. Dizzying and immensely gratifying, Fawkes balances romance, redemption, friendship and sacrifice in a brilliantly evocative way. My brain hurt in the best way at the complicated threads of this tapestry and in a lesser voice, it might well have fallen apart. Lucky for us, Brandes builds her world in deft and careful bricks so that the intersection of fact and fiction is seamlessly ingrained. I was so excited for this tale and now I can see why. I haven't read anything like this for a long time. .. and I doubt I will again. A book to sit and savour in a dark corner by candlelight while the world fizzes away and a fictional one replaces its ordinary canvas.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Ivy Rose

    FAWKESSSSSS!!!!!! I waited so long for this beautiful book to show up on my porch and OH MY WORD the cover did not disappoint. It's SO BEAUTIFUL!!!! *all the heart eyes* What I loved about this book: First, the magic system. It took me to get awhile to understand what was going on but once I figured it out I loved it. Second, the characters!!! ALL the characters had a noticeable motivation, were incredibly well developed, and I really cared about them. Third, Emma and Thomas. Enough said. *squea FAWKESSSSSS!!!!!! I waited so long for this beautiful book to show up on my porch and OH MY WORD the cover did not disappoint. It's SO BEAUTIFUL!!!! *all the heart eyes* What I loved about this book: First, the magic system. It took me to get awhile to understand what was going on but once I figured it out I loved it. Second, the characters!!! ALL the characters had a noticeable motivation, were incredibly well developed, and I really cared about them. Third, Emma and Thomas. Enough said. *squeals* What I didn't like so much: I had a super difficult time understanding what was the "good" side and the "bad" side. After finishing the book, I'm pretty sure that it was purposefully left that way. Even so, it was a little frustrating and confusing at first, but not enough to make me hate the book. I definitely recommend this book, and it will look AMAZING on your shelf!! :D

  22. 4 out of 5

    Eva

    Oh. My. Word. THIS BOOK. IT IS MY PRECIOUSSSSS. I’ve been eagerly anticipating Fawkes ever since I read Nadine’s Out of Time series and fell in love with Parvin, Solomon, and all the rest of the gang (yes, even Skelley). And, man, it did not disappoint. So, Fawkes is set in 1600’s England, which is one of my favorite time eras (well, I tend to lump the 1400’s to 1600’s together, but anyway) and I love how Nadine kept stuff really historically accurate (as explained in the Author’s Note at the end) b Oh. My. Word. THIS BOOK. IT IS MY PRECIOUSSSSS. I’ve been eagerly anticipating Fawkes ever since I read Nadine’s Out of Time series and fell in love with Parvin, Solomon, and all the rest of the gang (yes, even Skelley). And, man, it did not disappoint. So, Fawkes is set in 1600’s England, which is one of my favorite time eras (well, I tend to lump the 1400’s to 1600’s together, but anyway) and I love how Nadine kept stuff really historically accurate (as explained in the Author’s Note at the end) because with the fantasy element, she could’ve thrown accuracy to the wind and done whatever. But she didn’t and I LOVED that. (If it seems like I’m talking about Nadine very familiarly, it’s ’cause I’m one of her ninjas and I feel like we’re almost friends.) And speaking of the fantasy…I normally don’t like the genre, but it was so, so cool! The masks, the colour powers, the White Light, etc.; I dug it all. My favorite part of Fawkes is indubitably the characters. I’ve read some reviews where people said that Thomas wasn’t the greatest protagonist, but I liked him throughout the whole book. He wasn’t perfect (and who wants to read about characters who are perfect?) but he went through this whole awesome journey where he asked questions and discovered the Truth for himself and learned from his mistakes and wrestled with the decisions he made and it was so real and human and relatable. Loooove. Then there’s mah girl, Emma. She’s a super awesome fighter with plenty of skillz, while also being gracious and kind and warm and loving – basically, she’s not your typical tough, soulless Action Girl™ and I thought that was great. Plus, THAT PLOT TWIST WHEN SHE TOOK OFF HER MASK??? How did I not see that coming?! (I love it when books surprise me.) Guy Fawkes rounds out the trio of main/main-ish characters and while I wasn’t sure how much I liked him throughout most of Fawkes, he completely redeemed himself in my eyes by the end. Many, many tears were shed. His relationship with Thomas was flawed and awkward at times and often frustrating, but it also worked on so many levels. And The Bad Guy was chilling, kind of epic, and totally creepy. Everything a good villain should be. While the faith message wasn’t as strong in Fawkes as it was in the Out of Time series, I still loved and ‘got’ the allegory and all the themes Nadine wove into the story. Awesome. I’d recommend this book to anyone who’s a fan of historical fiction (with a dash of romance), fantasy fiction, allegorical fiction…or simply anyone who loves a good story! I was given a free copy of Fawkes from BookLook Bloggers in exchange for my honest review.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Angela

    I loved this!!!! Full video review to come!

  24. 5 out of 5

    Alaina Meserole

    Definitely ended up being a page turner. Fawkes started off slow and I did end up getting a bit bored here and there. Trust me, I brought out the bottle of wine to help me get into the book. It didn't help. Once I got to about 100 pages in, I took a break. A much needed one if you ask me. I watched the first two seasons of bones (yeah, I did a mini binge -yikes!) and drank more wine. After waking up this morning (and a cup or two of coffee) I re-dove into this book. I'm so happy that I did becaus Definitely ended up being a page turner. Fawkes started off slow and I did end up getting a bit bored here and there. Trust me, I brought out the bottle of wine to help me get into the book. It didn't help. Once I got to about 100 pages in, I took a break. A much needed one if you ask me. I watched the first two seasons of bones (yeah, I did a mini binge -yikes!) and drank more wine. After waking up this morning (and a cup or two of coffee) I re-dove into this book. I'm so happy that I did because it got so much better! In this book, you will meet Thomas Fawkes. He has been dealing with this mysterious stone plague for a while. Now this plague was quite interesting to read about. I wanted to know how he was randomly infected and how it mysteriously would go dormant. It wasn't the only thing that intrigued me - no, the white light was definitely more interesting. I wanted to know why there was this whole war about it. Why people where either so against it or cherished it. I needed to know more. Back to Thomas, he was adorable. A bit boring but his adorableness won me over. I hated how he was frowned upon by his looks and this "plague". Then the whole thing with his dad basically abandoning him and not giving him his mask was kind of baffling. It just didn't make sense to me. I am, however, glad that his dad and him kind of fixed their relationship. He wasn't father of the year in my eyes but I'm happy that he realized his mistakes before his death. Besides Thomas, there's Emma. I really liked her character. I also felt bad for her because she was just like Thomas. Hiding in plain sight. They were both frowned upon but for different reasons. Emma for her skin color. Thomas for his plague. Yet, they found and leaned on each other when things got tough. Their friendship/crush that was developing throughout the book was a bit cute. I honestly didn't want to ship them early on because of my opinion of her in the beginning. She went from someone I didn't like to very likable pretty quickly. After the ending, I definitely ended up shipping them together. Then there was Henry. God, I hated his stinking guts so god damn much. It was obvious that he would either end up the villain or the sidekick of one. He was just a little bitch that deserved a swift kick to the nuts. I was very proud of Thomas sticking up for Emma and making Henry feel bad for not seeing her for her. Her talent. Her as a person and not an object. She was not his pet. She was not his. When they walked away from Henry, boy I was so proud. Again, I'm really happy that I went back into this book. It definitely got better and I definitely ended up loving it.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Schuyler

    Last Friday I couldn't sleep. So I curled up on the couch for an hour with Minky blanket and Fawkes--and the next morning, after some sleep, I curled up and binge-read the rest of it. :) There's always a little nervous feeling when you get a new book from an author you like. Will you love it as much as the others? The Out of Time series was such a loveable series with vivid characters, so I really wanted to know how Fawkes would feel. It had a delicious cover: check. But what about the story ins Last Friday I couldn't sleep. So I curled up on the couch for an hour with Minky blanket and Fawkes--and the next morning, after some sleep, I curled up and binge-read the rest of it. :) There's always a little nervous feeling when you get a new book from an author you like. Will you love it as much as the others? The Out of Time series was such a loveable series with vivid characters, so I really wanted to know how Fawkes would feel. It had a delicious cover: check. But what about the story inside? At first, I struggled to connect with Thomas, Guy Fawkes, and the plot to blow up Parliament. Because the story spans two years, I think the beginning struggles tension-wise because time has to pass before you can really set the time bomb ticking. But the plot starts to pick up in places in the Black section, and really picks up by the masquerade ball. Thomas and Emma in that scene are the cutest. ever. I ship them. :) As I kept reading, the theme knocked my socks off. The wisdom and maturity of truth in this book is such a beautiful contribution to bookshelves everywhere. I loved its implications for this generation. It's a historical book that manages to answer important questions and issues of today's millennial generation. We're living in an age where everyone has a label, similar to the color systems. We're also living in an age where hatred for the opposing side is just as rampant as the Keeper/Igniter war. But as Thomas finds himself further and further entangled in a war that will lead to the death of innocents, the book's conclusion offers a wonderful truth that I won't spoil, just because it's even more fun to discover it for yourself. I was surprised by how deeply the theme tied into the hearts of the people who would be reading it, and delighted by how powerful it was. Fawkes, unlike the Out of Time series, is written for the general market, which means it's not explicitly Christian. But it's implicitly Christian in a powerful way that slices through the grey areas of our modern line of thought, which tries to validate experience over unchanging truth you can hold on to. Fawkes faces off between truth and personal belief in an engaging way that reaches the hearts of its intended audience. It's perfect for the YA age group. It dramatizes personal responsibility and relationship with God that can't rely on parents or even on yourself. And it encourages you to evaluate and re-think your own perspective. I appreciated it because even though I am a Christian, I'm still affected by the current cultural air. This book reminded me that ultimately how I feel or how someone I love feels really needs to take a back seat in my heart to what God feels about something.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Amanda

    You can also find my review here:https://devouringbooks2017.wordpress.... This is a very interesting novel that blends fantasy with historical fiction. I found myself immersed in the mystical urban fantasy world that at times felt allegorical in nature. This book help me see the time period from a new perspective, opening my eyes to different prejudices and also the events of the gunpowder plot. I've always liked the movie V for Vendetta, but the historical accuracy was far from the truth. Althou You can also find my review here:https://devouringbooks2017.wordpress.... This is a very interesting novel that blends fantasy with historical fiction. I found myself immersed in the mystical urban fantasy world that at times felt allegorical in nature. This book help me see the time period from a new perspective, opening my eyes to different prejudices and also the events of the gunpowder plot. I've always liked the movie V for Vendetta, but the historical accuracy was far from the truth. Although this book includes fantasy elements, it felt realistic and pretty historically accurate.  The characters were each developed well. Thomas Fawkes, Guy Fawke's son, was the main character and I really liked him in the story. I enjoyed the historically accurate characters as well as the characters who didn't actually exist in history. Emma and Thomas had a star-crossed romance which was an interesting sub-plot that defied the prejudices of the time period. The fantasy aspects were incredibly well done. The world building was done well and an interesting blend with the historical story. Instead of a conflict between Protestants and Catholics it was a conflict of Igniters and Keepers, people who wielded color power with different beliefs. Each side blamed the stone plague on each other, believing that because the other side practice color power "the wrong way" they brought a curse down upon them all. The story fell allegorical to the conflicts of the actual historical events and I found it easier to understand prejudices from this point of view, rather than from a religious point of view.  I love the way the plot unfolded. I knew the true history of Guy Fawkes and the gunpowder plot, but this was still an incredibly interesting novel. The fantasy elements made it much more fun to read. I believe readers would enjoy this book they were interested in historical fiction or fantasy novels. I would say that this book is probably one of the best releases of the summer. I received an advance review copy from Netgalley.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Alyssa

    Historical Fantasy is what dreams are made of.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Lou

    Will ya just look at that purdy cover! Stunning! What really impressed me here is that it is obvious Brandes has carried out a great deal of research into the historical events that take place in this book. She then takes those events and mixes them with a magical fantasy world that is simply magnificent! This combination was unique, exciting and a work of creative genius. I didn't want to leave that amazing world once I had finished reading and found myself wishing I had read it much more slowl Will ya just look at that purdy cover! Stunning! What really impressed me here is that it is obvious Brandes has carried out a great deal of research into the historical events that take place in this book. She then takes those events and mixes them with a magical fantasy world that is simply magnificent! This combination was unique, exciting and a work of creative genius. I didn't want to leave that amazing world once I had finished reading and found myself wishing I had read it much more slowly in order to savour it. Needless to say, I will be eagerly awaiting the authors next title. The authors writing is effortlessly engaging - it transported me right to the heart of the action and I felt as though I was a part of the plot rather than just reading it. There are a lot of elements to the plot and I enjoyed the various different layers that seamlessly intertwined to create the story. Everything in this book is so vivid - the characters, the setting, and the historical events come alive! I loved how distinctive and memorable each characters was and I was heavily invested in the story from the first few pages. This is easily one of the most amazing books I have ever read. I never really considered historical fantasy as a genre I would enjoy but I now know that if the premise is executed correctly, it can be absolutely breathtaking! Many thanks to Thomas Nelson for an ARC. I was not required to post a review and all thoughts and opinions expressed are my own.

  29. 4 out of 5

    R. G. Nairam

    I've put off reviewing this book for quite awhile, for a few reasons, but mainly: I've met Nadine and heard her speak, and enjoyed her past work. I was very excited for this one, or I wouldn't have requested a egalley. And it's not that I didn't enjoy this book, because I did. But it's clearly not for me. It's hard to review a book like that. One thing I've learned after reading /My Lady Jane/ and now /Fawkes/ is that while I get very excited about the prospect of historical fantasy, if it involves I've put off reviewing this book for quite awhile, for a few reasons, but mainly: I've met Nadine and heard her speak, and enjoyed her past work. I was very excited for this one, or I wouldn't have requested a egalley. And it's not that I didn't enjoy this book, because I did. But it's clearly not for me. It's hard to review a book like that. One thing I've learned after reading /My Lady Jane/ and now /Fawkes/ is that while I get very excited about the prospect of historical fantasy, if it involves major historical figures or historical events, I find it very distracting to read. As a historian (or maybe also just the kind of person I am) I'm constantly asking /is this real? did this happen? which of these things are shifts in the narrative?/ It's hard to pay attention to the story when I'm distracted by the history. I'm probably also running into the problem of being /familiar/ with the history but not /intimate/ with it--both /Fawkes/ and /My Lady Jane/ are squarely in early modern British history, which I study and care about, but not in as much detail as medieval history. If it was about King Richard the Lionheart, then I would know what the deviations were. If it was about ancient Japan, I would know nothing. This is clearly not a problem with either book, but with my tendency to be distracted by history. This problem popped up again with the connection of the magic system in this book to the protestant/Catholic conflict. It's very simplified, and it hurt my heart a little, as a protestant that has spent years of her life studying the Middle Ages. The other main issue I had with connecting to the book was the constant emotional updates from the main character. I think this happened some in the /Out of Times/ series, too. I just don't need so much input on a character's thought process, especially if they're stuck revolving around the same issue for a long time. Protestant/Catholic stuff aside, I did enjoy the connection of the magic system to religion. I thought that was a clever and interesting way to explore both the magic and belief. I liked Emma and how much I bounced back and forth guessing at what was going on with her. Her presence in the story was unique and welcome, and her dilemma with her guardian well-built and hard to crack. I liked the tough relationship between Thomas and his father, and how well Brandes avoided easy answers to anything between them. Overall she did a very good job keeping her villain/antagonistic characters from simply being pure evil. There are layers to almost every character Thomas interacts with. It doesn't really fit into my other paragraph categories, but I also found the last quarter or third of the book to be very compelling and interesting. Events tipped after the halfway mark and snowballed through interesting characters, themes, and relationships. Overall, I liked but didn't love this like I hoped I would. But I do honestly think others will. I received a complimentary copy of this book from Thomas Nelson through NetGalley. Opinions expressed in this review are completely my own.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Micaiah Saldaña

    WHERE DO I START?!?!? THIS WAS AMAZING. RTC!!!

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