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The Death of Truth: Notes on Falsehood in the Age of Trump

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A stirring and incisive manifesto on America's slide away from truth and reason. Over the last three decades, Michiko Kakutani has been thinking and writing about the demise of objective truth in popular culture, academia, and contemporary politics. In The Death of Truth, she connects the dots to reveal the slow march of untruth up to our present moment, when Red State an A stirring and incisive manifesto on America's slide away from truth and reason. Over the last three decades, Michiko Kakutani has been thinking and writing about the demise of objective truth in popular culture, academia, and contemporary politics. In The Death of Truth, she connects the dots to reveal the slow march of untruth up to our present moment, when Red State and Blue State America have little common ground, proven science is once more up for debate, and all opinions are held to be equally valid. (And, more often than not, rudely declared online.) The wisdom of the crowd has diminished the power of research and expertise, and we are each left clinging to the "facts" that best confirm our biases. With wit, erudition, and remarkable insight, Kakutani offers a provocative diagnosis of our current condition and presents a path forward for our truth-challenged times.


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A stirring and incisive manifesto on America's slide away from truth and reason. Over the last three decades, Michiko Kakutani has been thinking and writing about the demise of objective truth in popular culture, academia, and contemporary politics. In The Death of Truth, she connects the dots to reveal the slow march of untruth up to our present moment, when Red State an A stirring and incisive manifesto on America's slide away from truth and reason. Over the last three decades, Michiko Kakutani has been thinking and writing about the demise of objective truth in popular culture, academia, and contemporary politics. In The Death of Truth, she connects the dots to reveal the slow march of untruth up to our present moment, when Red State and Blue State America have little common ground, proven science is once more up for debate, and all opinions are held to be equally valid. (And, more often than not, rudely declared online.) The wisdom of the crowd has diminished the power of research and expertise, and we are each left clinging to the "facts" that best confirm our biases. With wit, erudition, and remarkable insight, Kakutani offers a provocative diagnosis of our current condition and presents a path forward for our truth-challenged times.

30 review for The Death of Truth: Notes on Falsehood in the Age of Trump

  1. 4 out of 5

    Krista

    As the former chief book critic of The New York Times, Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Michiko Kakutani has apparently spent the past three decades noting and commenting on the decline of “objective truth” in American literature and public life – and while she approves of this postmodern paradigm as it relates to art, she has been horrified to watch as disestablishmentarianism has migrated from a necessary Leftist pushback against the military-industrial complex to an alt-right, “drain the swa As the former chief book critic of The New York Times, Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Michiko Kakutani has apparently spent the past three decades noting and commenting on the decline of “objective truth” in American literature and public life – and while she approves of this postmodern paradigm as it relates to art, she has been horrified to watch as disestablishmentarianism has migrated from a necessary Leftist pushback against the military-industrial complex to an alt-right, “drain the swamp” anti-intellectualism which has found its apex in the current alternate facts, fake news, lies tweeting president. Quoting from sources as diverse as Hannah Arendt's The Origins of Totalitarianism, David Foster Wallace's Infinite Jest, and Donald Trump's own Think Big, Kakutani's The Death of Truth is scholarly, logical, and angry. Here's the thing: For a book that decries polarisation and bipartisanship and the algorithms that ensure we only read news stories online that align with what we already believe, there's nothing neutral about Kakutani's treatise; she is preaching to her choir and dismissing everyone else as “alt-right trolls” and “dittoheads”; nothing here would be persuasive to anyone who believes that mainstream media has a liberal bias, and especially since she spent her career at The New York Times (which isn't to say that I fundamentally disagree with what she writes here). This is a quick read, divided into nine essays, and I've decided to let Kakutani do most of the talking here in excerpts I selected as demonstrative of either her points or her tone. (Two notes: I am a Canadian and have read this book only as an interested bystander. And since I read an ARC, it is probably particularly egregious that I have quoted such big chunks; these passages may not be in their final forms, but they do reflect the book I read.) The Decline and Fall of Reason: Trump, who launched his political career by shamelessly promoting birtherism and who has spoken approvingly of the conspiracy theorist and shock jock Alex Jones, presided over an administration that became, in its first year, the very embodiment of anti-Enlightenment principles, repudiating the values of rationalism, tolerance, and empiricism in both its policies and its modus operandi – a reflection of the commander in chief's erratic, impulsive decision-making style based not on knowledge but on instinct, whim, and preconceived (and often delusional) notions of how the world operates. The New Culture Wars: Since the 1960s, there has been a snowballing loss of faith in institutions and official narratives. Some of this skepticism has been a necessary corrective – a rational response to the calamities of Vietnam and Iraq, to Watergate and the financial crisis of 2008, and to the cultural biases that had long infected everything from the teaching of history in elementary schools to the injustices of the justice system. But the liberating democratization of information made possible by the internet not only spurred breathtaking innovation and entrepreneurship; it also led to a cascade of misinformation and relativism, as evidenced by today's fake news epidemic. “Moi” and the Rise of Subjectivity: Writers as disparate as Louise Erdrich, David Mitchell, Don DeLillo, Julian Barnes, Chuck Palahniuk, Gillian Flynn, and Lauren Groff would play with devices (like multiples points of view, unreliable narrators, and intertwining story lines) pioneered decades ago by Faulkner, Woolf, Ford Madox Ford, and Nabokov to try to capture the new Rashomon-like reality in which subjectivity rules and, in the infamous words of former president Bill Clinton, truth “depends on what the meaning of the word 'is' is.” The Vanishing of Reality: Renee DiResta, who studies conspiracy theories on the web, argues that Reddit can be a useful testing ground for bad actors – including foreign governments like Russia – to try out memes or fake stories to see how much traction they get. DiResta warned in the spring of 2016 that the algorithms of social networks – which give people news that's popular and trending, rather than accurate or important – are helping to promote conspiracy theories. This sort of fringe content can both affect how people think and seep into public policy debates on matters like vaccines, zoning laws, and water fluoridation. The Co-opting of Language: Trump's incoherence (his twisted syntax, his reversals, his insincerity, his bad faith, and his inflammatory bombast) is both a mirror of the chaos he creates and thrives on and an essential instrument in his liar's tool kit. His interviews, off-teleprompter speeches, and tweets are a startling jumble of insults, exclamations, boasts, digressions, non sequiturs, qualifications, exhortations, and innuendos – a bully's efforts to intimidate, gaslight, polarize, and scapegoat. Filters, Silos, and Tribes: Because social media sites give us information that tends to confirm our view of the world, people live in increasingly narrow content silos and correspondingly smaller walled gardens of thought. It's a big reason why liberals and conservatives, Democrats and Republicans, find it harder and harder to agree on facts and why a shared sense of reality is becoming elusive. Attention Deficit: While public trust in the media declined in the new millennium (part of a growing mistrust of institutions and gatekeepers, as well as a concerted effort by the right wing to discredit the mainstream press), more and more people started getting their news through Facebook, Twitter, and other online sources: by 2017, fully two-thirds of Americans said they got at least some of their news through social media. This reliance on family and friends and Facebook and Twitter for news, however, would feed the ravenous monster of fake news. “The Firehose of Falsehood”: The sheer volume of dezinformatsiya unleashed by the Russian fire-hose system – much like the more improvised but equally voluminous stream of lies, scandals, and shocks emitted by Trump, his GOP enablers, and media apparatchiks – tends to overwhelm and numb people while simultaneously defining deviancy down and normalizing the unacceptable. Outrage gives way to outrage fatigue, which gives way to the sort of cynicism and weariness that empowers those disseminating lies. The Schadenfreude of the Trolls: Trump, of course, is a troll – both by temperament and by habit. His tweets and offhand taunts are the very essence of trolling – the lies, the scorn, the invective, the trash talk, and the rabid non sequiturs of an angry, aggrieved, isolated, and deeply self-absorbed adolescent who lives in a self-constructed bubble and gets the attention he craves from bashing his enemies and trailing clouds of outrage and dismay in his path. Even as president, he continues to troll individuals and institutions, tweeting and retweeting insults, fake news, and treacherous innuendo. Despite making comparisons between Trump's misinformation techniques and those of Hitler and Lenin, Kakutani ends on a hopeful note; pointing out those citizens who are pushing back against threats of despotism and urging her readers to join in: “It's essential that citizens defy the cynicism and resignation that autocrats and power-hungry politicians depend upon to subvert resistance.” American citizens must also protect the institutions that their founding fathers put in place to uphold democracy: the checks and balances of a tripartite political system, education, and a free and independent press. This is an angry book, and while Kakutani laments the modern echo chamber of thought, I can't see this making much of an impact with those outside her own silo. Four stars is a rounding up.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Mark

    I broke my rule about not reading books with Trump in the title for the ARC of this very solid extended essay by Michiko Kakutani. I particularly liked the way she incorporated her extensive reading in fiction and non-fiction to provide examples and commentary on today's politics and how we got here. Also, good footnotes provide a guide to further reading. My big reservation is that the only people who are likely to read this book are very unlikely to learn anything new. This can be read in one I broke my rule about not reading books with Trump in the title for the ARC of this very solid extended essay by Michiko Kakutani. I particularly liked the way she incorporated her extensive reading in fiction and non-fiction to provide examples and commentary on today's politics and how we got here. Also, good footnotes provide a guide to further reading. My big reservation is that the only people who are likely to read this book are very unlikely to learn anything new. This can be read in one sitting unless it depresses you too much.

  3. 5 out of 5

    BlackOxford

    Being Reasonable Epistemology has become fashionable once again. With any luck this might prove to be Donald Trump’s most important achievement: a backlash against the reality (largely his) of fake news. Unfortunately The Death of Truth is yet more fake news. Epistemology is the study of how we know what we know, of what constitutes a fact, and logically therefore about what constitutes an anti-fact, that is a lie. It doesn’t take much epistemological analysis to determine that Trump lies, more or Being Reasonable Epistemology has become fashionable once again. With any luck this might prove to be Donald Trump’s most important achievement: a backlash against the reality (largely his) of fake news. Unfortunately The Death of Truth is yet more fake news. Epistemology is the study of how we know what we know, of what constitutes a fact, and logically therefore about what constitutes an anti-fact, that is a lie. It doesn’t take much epistemological analysis to determine that Trump lies, more or less continuously, about everything he encounters - events, people, issues, decisions, statements, whether these are politically relevant or not. These lies are endorsed and disseminated by tame media like Fox News and Breitbart which have their own commercial agenda. This much is obvious. But what is much more difficult to establish is the epistemological structure, as it were, of the human beings who hear these lies, cheer them and act on them - in the way they vote; their behaviour toward opponents, and minorities; and in their expressed opinions about the rest of the world. The presumption of a book like Kakatuni’s is that these people have been duped, and that by demonstrating that the motivation for their actions is a pack of lies they’ve been told, the era of Trumpian mendacity can be checked. Essentially, lack of discriminatory power brought about by inadequate education is Kakutani’s key issue. Therefore better analytical education, she believes, is the solution. This presumption, and its purported solution is, however, in Kakutani’s own terms, wrong. The people who adhere to the Trumpian ideology know well that the President lies. They know that Fox and Breitbart have their own interests in these lies. They simply don’t care. The fact that Trump lies has about as much political import to them as the barometric pressure. If photographic evidence shows that Trump’s inauguration had much smaller crowds than claimed, if numerous women have prima facie valid claims for sexual harassment despite his denial, if his closest advisors were obviously involved in relationships on his behalf with the Russians and nefarious others: it does not matter at all to the folk who support him. He has said this over and over again during his campaign and his presidency. And his supporters cheer him and themselves when he says it. To conclude, therefore, that Kakutani’s book is preaching to the choir is not a very profound insight. But it does reveal the essential flaw in her epistemological analysis. People, all people, have interests. Interests are what defines the things which are not only important but the things which can be and will be seen, heard, recognised, and generally allowed into one’s cognition. Interests are also the motivating force for reason; it is they, not some arbitrary logic, which defines the reasonable. Kakutani, like many before her, tries desperately to separate what is factual from what is of interest, that is to be objective about this ambiguous term about the factuality called truth. For her, recognising interests is equivalent to the terrible heresy of “postmodernist relativism.” Paradoxically, one might think, this abhorrence of relativism is shared with Kakutani by Trump’s evangelical and conservative ideological supporters. They too want a firm epistemological foundation; and they believe they can get it by the articulation of basic doctrines - the inerrancy of scripture, the necessity for complete personal freedom, the benefits of unlimited competition, the non-existence of something called society or any of a number of other ideological or religious premises. This establishment of fundamental premises is the only path available toward absolute, irrefutable, non-relative truth. Obviously diverse premises lead to diverse versions of what constitutes the truth, of facts, of signal versus noise. For the moment at least these versions are not as important in American politics as the principle on which they agree: Truth is fixed, certain, and central for personal and social well-being. It may not be obvious but this principle is in fact a religious concept. It is correlated with the explicitly Christian doctrinal idea of faith, that is to say the firm, ‘reasonable’ belief in eternal salvation. Faith as an epistemological principle is arguably the most important contribution of Christianity to world culture. Arguing against such a principle has never had much success for obvious reasons. Kakutani’s use of the principle to undermine it is even less effective. It simply adds another set of competing premises. So faith in absolute, invariable truth is the poison which creates not the antidote which cures fake news. The only workable solution to the proliferation of fake news involves primarily the recognition of the interests represented by apparently unreasonable behaviour. Lack of apparent reason is equivalent to an inability to appreciate purpose when it is confronted. Ultimately, the effect of establishing the criteria of ‘objective’ truth is the exclusion of whole sets of human interests which then cannot be discussed politically. In other words, more of the same problem we are experiencing at present. I don’t know what the purpose of Trump voters is. Perhaps it is merely to be heard, which in itself could explain a great deal. I find them annoying in any case because they don’t appear to consider it their responsibility to articulate what they’re after. So there well could be an educational aspect to the situation because ostensibly unreasonable people may not have the ability to effectively articulate their reasons. If so, however, education in being able to listen articulately, especially among politicians, may be the most important parallel pedagogical task.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Marks54

    “The Death of Truth” is a short book that reads like a long essay. The author, Michiko Kakutani, is a well known literary critic and former chief book review editor of the New York Times. She is (or should be) a legend to anyone interested in reading good books and being highly and critically discerning about the books that one reads. It is not necessary to agree with all that she writes, although that may well happen. It is difficult to be a discerning reader and not pay attention to what she t “The Death of Truth” is a short book that reads like a long essay. The author, Michiko Kakutani, is a well known literary critic and former chief book review editor of the New York Times. She is (or should be) a legend to anyone interested in reading good books and being highly and critically discerning about the books that one reads. It is not necessary to agree with all that she writes, although that may well happen. It is difficult to be a discerning reader and not pay attention to what she thinks about a book. The book is concerned with the assaults that have come to characterize the Trump Administration, ranging from the theatre surrounding the Press Secretaries that have worked for the President, to the Twitter Feed of the President, to the various public falsehoods that regularly issue in Washington DC and are catalogued by the press, to the emotional and more often than not baseless and hyperbolic attacks that issue from the President towards those with whom he disagrees. We all know about this and Kakutani is highly critical of the evolving norms that seem to focus on making claims and other statements that do not seem intended to be subjected to standards of truth or falsity - what Harry Frankfurt analyzes in his book, “On Bullshit”. Kakutani’s book is interesting not for new points that she raises. Indeed, if one follows the mainstream press and is concerned about these issues, he or she will feel right at home. The perspective she adopts is also clear - Kakutani is deeply critical of the attack on truth and sees it as a threat to American democracy. She provides a rich context for these developments, showing that they have been around in American literary life for quite some time. She goes into some detail on deconstruction as practiced by Derrida, Foucault, and others, and how the parlor games of left intellectuals have been adopted, intensified, and put to practical use (weaponized) conservative extremists. I had noticed this too before reading this book, but am reassured by her analysis. An interesting focus on part of the book is on the rebirth in interest in dystopian fiction, especially of a political variant, since the 2016 election. For example, Orwell has seldom sold more copies, especially 1984 and Animal Farm. She also brings up the renewed interest and relevance of Huxley’s Brave New World, which is a very different view of how civilization ends in tyranny than that of Orwell. By juxtaposing Orwell and Huxley, Kakutani hints at ways in which the current assault on truth and reason may differ from prior attacks. I hope she develops these ideas further.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Kyle

    Simply put, this is essential reading if you want to understand, at least in part, the political chaos caused by technology, and perpetuated by those who harness its power for authoritarian purposes.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Kent Winward

    There is a certain amount of hubris in Kakutani's take that the world and politics revolves around literary trends and theories. As much as I want to buy in whole hog, the hubris is the downfall of the book. Maybe I'm getting old and cynical, but it seems much more likely (and realistic) to me that literary trends are usually in response to changes in the political and social world, not the instigators of the change. Trump seems more a product of reality television than post-modern, relativistic There is a certain amount of hubris in Kakutani's take that the world and politics revolves around literary trends and theories. As much as I want to buy in whole hog, the hubris is the downfall of the book. Maybe I'm getting old and cynical, but it seems much more likely (and realistic) to me that literary trends are usually in response to changes in the political and social world, not the instigators of the change. Trump seems more a product of reality television than post-modern, relativistic thought as evidenced by our literature. So much more is going on that Kakutani can see through the literary-lens glasses.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Gary Moreau

    The truth is this: If you like literature, this is the best book you’ve read this year. If you don’t like Trump, this will be the best book you’ve read since he descended the gilded escalator. And if you don’t like the tone of modern politics, it is the best book you’ve read in a couple of decades. It’s informative, extremely well written, and there is no personal mud slinging. It’s a book about literature and will tell you more about the politics of today (and literature) than any pundit could The truth is this: If you like literature, this is the best book you’ve read this year. If you don’t like Trump, this will be the best book you’ve read since he descended the gilded escalator. And if you don’t like the tone of modern politics, it is the best book you’ve read in a couple of decades. It’s informative, extremely well written, and there is no personal mud slinging. It’s a book about literature and will tell you more about the politics of today (and literature) than any pundit could begin to. The underlying point of the book is that the attack on truth began in the 1960s with the emergence of postmodernism. The author, however, does not just assert that truth, as most contemporary politicians would. She documents it; because, to her, the truth is still the truth, and it’s still important. And as Daniel Patrick Moynihan once said, “Everyone is entitled to his own opinion, but not his own facts.” (I actually had lunch at a private table for four with him one time but he, sadly, did not use that quote. He did, however, talk about the outrageously high cost and lack of access to health insurance. Circa 1990!) I am now a retired/involuntary gig economy resident of Michigan, so I understand how Trump got elected. (His opponent was actually denied, but that’s another story. Not as in cheated, but denied nonetheless.) What has amazed me ever since, however, is how stable his support appears to be. Orwell, whose 1984 I reread recently for context, could not have imagined, in his most creative moment, the current disregard for truth and honesty. There is, nonetheless, a logical explanation, and this book provides it. It won’t make you feel any better, but it will make you feel a little less like you are wandering in the wilderness. And, as you would expect from such a renowned literary critic, the writing is superb. It definitely made me yearn for those Sunday mornings several decades ago when I would rush out to buy The New York Times, a couple of croissants, and my wife and I would spend the morning in bed reading. (I lived in New York at the time—sans children, obviously.) As one who truly enjoys the literary in literature and appreciates the value of words, and one who lived in China for a decade and resides in a necessarily bilingual household, my favorite line was, “Precise words, like facts, mean little to Trump, as interpreters, who struggle to translate his grammatical anarchy, can attest.” A truly spectacular book that should be number one. You will cringe at times, laugh at others, but end up with a much better understanding of why life in America feels so surreal at the moment. The book reminded me of the fact that during the entire time I was growing up my parents, both veterans of World War II, now deceased, refused to tell any of their children which candidate they voted for. I have no idea to this day if they were Democrats or Republicans. That, in their minds, was personal, a right to privacy they had both fought for. Later, in the 1960s, I was a teenage boy not looking forward to receiving my draft notice and being shipped off to fight in the jungles of Vietnam. I watched Walter Cronkite religiously to get the latest news. And while it was never good he signed off each night, “And that’s the way it is.” Nobody bothers with that kind of truth any more. And that is a loss we all pay for.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Peter Mcloughlin

    Very deep reading of the current crisis which has roots that go back pretty far to elements of 20th-century movements like postmodernism and the totalitarian movements from the 1930s. Postmodernism and Nihilism were the tools to pry apart institutions and the idea of the truth and replace it with a nihilistic will to power that is at the center of the far right which holds the reigns of government in the US. The carefully written philosophical piece puts together the trends from the sixties of q Very deep reading of the current crisis which has roots that go back pretty far to elements of 20th-century movements like postmodernism and the totalitarian movements from the 1930s. Postmodernism and Nihilism were the tools to pry apart institutions and the idea of the truth and replace it with a nihilistic will to power that is at the center of the far right which holds the reigns of government in the US. The carefully written philosophical piece puts together the trends from the sixties of questioning the truth and objectivity and the raising of a subjective relativism as a tool for the far right that since the nineties has served it well in amassing power and capturing a large enough part of the public to follow it wherever it goes. When there is no truth or facts beyond dispute then the biggest megaphone wins. Perfect for oligarchical nihilists in Russia and the US to sacrifice truth in pursuit of power. It is a return of the climate of the thirties in Germany and Russia where radicals in pursuit of power and total destruction of their perceived enemies seized control and brought about tyrannies in the Soviet Union and Nazi Germany that now are returning in new forms in the present moment in Russia, Europe, India, and America. The destruction this nihilism wrought in WWII nearly destroyed the future. This time we might not get off so easy.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer Malinowski

    The Death of Truth by Kakutani is a fairly short read, coming in ~200 pages. But it is densely written and full of quotes and insights from a large number of sources. To get the most from it, I recommend reading only a chapter at a time and really mulling over the premise of each before moving on. (Do as I say, not as I did.) That said, Kakutani is merely one of the newest authors in a long line in the past several decades to call out the attack on intellectualism, truth, and government. My firs The Death of Truth by Kakutani is a fairly short read, coming in ~200 pages. But it is densely written and full of quotes and insights from a large number of sources. To get the most from it, I recommend reading only a chapter at a time and really mulling over the premise of each before moving on. (Do as I say, not as I did.) That said, Kakutani is merely one of the newest authors in a long line in the past several decades to call out the attack on intellectualism, truth, and government. My first exposures to these concepts (other than my own insights) came from Susan Jacoby's The Age of American Unreason and Al Gore's The Assault on Reason--both of which are referenced in The Death of Truth. I think that these (and others) set the bar too high, because while I wanted to like the Death of Truth, I was not overly impressed. Kakutani updates the premise with myriad examples focused on the Trump campaign and administration. Though the examples used certainly bring the points across, I found little analysis of the underlying reasons for the current situation beyond what has already been hashed out by Jacoby, Gore, and the countless others mentioned in the book. tl;dr: if you've not previously read any substantive book on the topic, this is a great intro (and I *highly* suggest using the book to curate a reading list). But if you've been paying attention for the last 20+ years and this is not your first rodeo, as it were, skip this in favor of a weightier tome with more analysis and insight. Disclaimer: I received an ARC through a Goodreads giveaway.

  10. 5 out of 5

    JP

    This book scares the hell out of me. The current state of the world and Nationalist leaders scares the hell out me. This book does nothing to help put those fears to rest. This book fuels these fears further. This is the point of this book. I hope it works for you how it has worked for me. There was a one star detraction in the review from a perfect score as there is no breathing room. This book is unrelenting with facts and continues to hammer at the reader from the first page to the last. Ther This book scares the hell out of me. The current state of the world and Nationalist leaders scares the hell out me. This book does nothing to help put those fears to rest. This book fuels these fears further. This is the point of this book. I hope it works for you how it has worked for me. There was a one star detraction in the review from a perfect score as there is no breathing room. This book is unrelenting with facts and continues to hammer at the reader from the first page to the last. There is a bright epilogue to close this book out. Thankfully.

  11. 5 out of 5

    John Muriango

    Worst book ever written! Trump Derangement Syndrome is real!

  12. 5 out of 5

    Marc Gerstein

    Halfway through but I feel I want to put some things out there right now (and by the way, although I’m early post publication, I’m reading a purchased — pre-ordered — ebook, not the holder of an ARC copy). I’m not a Trump lover at all (I voted for Hillary), but Chapter 1 is a Trump Derangement Syndrome disaster that leaves me embarrassed; i.e. that my disdain for Trump paints me as one who would associate with that mindless rant. I really, really wish Kakutani would revise the manuscript simply b Halfway through but I feel I want to put some things out there right now (and by the way, although I’m early post publication, I’m reading a purchased — pre-ordered — ebook, not the holder of an ARC copy). I’m not a Trump lover at all (I voted for Hillary), but Chapter 1 is a Trump Derangement Syndrome disaster that leaves me embarrassed; i.e. that my disdain for Trump paints me as one who would associate with that mindless rant. I really, really wish Kakutani would revise the manuscript simply by deleting Chapter 1 and then renumbering the other chapters. Seriously. Chapter 1 is that bad. Once Kakutani stops with the amateurish political diatribe and goes back to her own wheelhouse, as a serious cultural critic (literary in her case), the work picks up steam and starts to deliver on the premise of the title, The Death of Truth. It’s not an easy read, which is not surprising since Kakutani is not an author but a critic and as such delivers points in a crisp condensed manner rather than in the elaborately drawn out way one might expect of a scholarly writer. But if you can hang with it, there’s a lot to think about. The topic itself is a powerful and important one (I don’t usually pre-order but did so here) and I’m impressed with the perspective Kakutani brings to it; not just a chronicling of every major liar out there or essays about how subjectivity is now king. Instead, its a well-argued discussion of how this springs from larger societal developments reflected in other ways, particularly developments in the arts. As another reviewer said, this is a short work that seems readable in one sitting but at the halfway point, I decided that this would be better appreciated by slowing down and, as another reviewer suggested, taking time to think in between chapter readings. My rating is based on my half read and, of course, is subject to change when I finish. I took away a point because of the sophomoric Trump obsession that cheapens what otherwise looks to be a valuable and insightful dissertation. (This Trump derangement syndrome is real and is making it too easy for his critics to get lazy and think they accomplish something if they just find creative ways to say Trump sucks. Kakutani fell for it in Chapter 1, which is why I wish she’d delete it, and perhaps kill the sub-title.)

  13. 4 out of 5

    Mrs. Danvers

    This slim volume is one of the most depressing books I've read in recent memory because it is so incisive and straightforward. Kakutani hits the nail squarely on the head and I don't have much faith that the truth will come out of hiding any time soon.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Geri Degruy

    This book should be essential reading for all Americans, (and actually all people in all countries.) Kakutani explains some of the history and seeds of untruth so we can see how this all began and how it has played out in the past. Her nine brief chapters plus Epilogue systematically investigate some of the major causes of our current state of confusion about what is true, from the distortion of language to social media to "fake news" and beyond. I found this book extremely helpful in its organiz This book should be essential reading for all Americans, (and actually all people in all countries.) Kakutani explains some of the history and seeds of untruth so we can see how this all began and how it has played out in the past. Her nine brief chapters plus Epilogue systematically investigate some of the major causes of our current state of confusion about what is true, from the distortion of language to social media to "fake news" and beyond. I found this book extremely helpful in its organization of the origins and effects of untruth. I have often found myself in a state of confusion about how we got to this terrible place, how as a people we can cling to adamantly held, diametrically opposite beliefs, how Trump can get away with lying on a daily basis. Kakutani clarified some of that for me. She also presents the frightening results when a Trump keeps getting away with lies, without consequences, leading to a totalitarian state. One of the functions of the chaos of untruth is to exhaust the people, to make them cynical and then retreat to their own lives. It is clear we must rise above that in order to retain democracy. We need to stand up for truth.

  15. 5 out of 5

    AC

    Good for college students. I may assign it to one of my classes. Certainly not ground breaking, or analytically deep. Surveyish...

  16. 4 out of 5

    Michael Jantz

    A bit of a "preaching to the choir" situation, but if the choir is "people who read books", well of course the rest won't be able to get this message (not that they would be receptive anyways). But my point (and Kakutani's) is that that non-choir is a group of quasi-literate half-baked Postmodernists devoid of not only reason but also the usual array of qualities one might associate with decent neighborly folks (empathy, for example). The book does a nice job of explaining the current strategies A bit of a "preaching to the choir" situation, but if the choir is "people who read books", well of course the rest won't be able to get this message (not that they would be receptive anyways). But my point (and Kakutani's) is that that non-choir is a group of quasi-literate half-baked Postmodernists devoid of not only reason but also the usual array of qualities one might associate with decent neighborly folks (empathy, for example). The book does a nice job of explaining the current strategies for pacifying and enraging the populace, and as the title suggests, it all revolves around the corruption of truth and empirical fact. A nice overview that makes me want to delve into the endnotes for further reading.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Joe M

    Brilliantly researched and assembled by an author who is undeniably, a legend. Sure, I could knock off a star for being a bit scattershot and slightly overwhelming, but the importance of this book in 2018 can't be understated.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Paul

    For my money, the most important book on politics, culture and the phenomenon of "fake news" over the past two years. Brilliantly written and argued.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Regina Lemoine

    In clear and intelligent prose, Kakutani explains how we got from 1960's counterculture to our current, post-truth, era of Trump. Many of us were left reeling after the election, wondering how this could happen. As Kakutani points out, it happened because the conditions were ripe for it. She writes about the roles that the internet, Russians, the GOP and Democrats, news organizations, the white working class, Brietbart and Bannon, and most every other player have in the current debacle that is A In clear and intelligent prose, Kakutani explains how we got from 1960's counterculture to our current, post-truth, era of Trump. Many of us were left reeling after the election, wondering how this could happen. As Kakutani points out, it happened because the conditions were ripe for it. She writes about the roles that the internet, Russians, the GOP and Democrats, news organizations, the white working class, Brietbart and Bannon, and most every other player have in the current debacle that is American politics. Being for years by trade a book critic, it's no wonder that literature heavily figures in Kakutani's writing on this subject. The expected books--1984 and Brave New World--are given air time, but so are Baudrillard, Derrida, and the postmodernist movement in general. I was intrigued by her tying together the postmodern notions of the instability of speech and text leading to the acceptance of "alternate facts." Anyway, this is a timely and fascinating book and I highly recommend it.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Chris Gaither

    Like all autocrats, President Trump weaponizes language to gain and consolidate power -- to assert power over the truth itself. "The Death of Truth" tries to make sense of the Trump era by examining the cultural forces that enabled it. I had hoped for some original reporting, but instead it's a slim book of polemic. Michiko Kukutani puts to good use her three decades as chief book critic for the New York Times: She combs through academic and literary works to explain how Trump's murdering of the Like all autocrats, President Trump weaponizes language to gain and consolidate power -- to assert power over the truth itself. "The Death of Truth" tries to make sense of the Trump era by examining the cultural forces that enabled it. I had hoped for some original reporting, but instead it's a slim book of polemic. Michiko Kukutani puts to good use her three decades as chief book critic for the New York Times: She combs through academic and literary works to explain how Trump's murdering of the truth is the natural outcome of the postmodern movement in which all truth is seen as relative, the exported nihilism from Russia's propaganda machine, and a cynical and fractured American citizenry that's wrestling with worries about technology changes and globalization. She dedicates the book to "journalists everywhere working to report the news," but she doesn't adopt their tepid on-one-hand-on-the-other-hand language. Her outrage drips off the pages. She calls Trump's politics "unhinged," says he "lied reflexively and shamelessly" (with examples), and refers to his "mendacity" and "shamelessness" which encourages other politicians to lie as well. Her arguments rely on a wide-ranging canon: Hannah Arendt, Cass Sunstein, Zeynep Tufecki, Neil Postman, David Foster Wallace, Philip Roth, George Orwell, and Thomas Pynchon, to name just a few. This is not a book of hope, but rather of analysis, judgment, and deep concern for American democracy. Her proposed solutions run only a page or so: defy cynicism and resignation like the Parkland students have; protect our governmental institutions, education, and a free press; and work harder to establish commonly agreed-upon facts. She seems more intent on the diagnosis than the prescription. “Without truth, democracy is hobbled," she writes. "The founders recognized this, and those seeking democracy’s survival must recognize it today."

  21. 5 out of 5

    Philip Cohen

    This is an excellent book. Kakutani takes Trump seriously and considers him literally, in the context of the history of authoritarianism and America's descent, and concludes we have underestimated the risk of a 1984 scenario. Short, very readable, lots of great references to the intellectual history. Highly recommend.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Joan

    Amazing book, describing how the country arrived at this point of "fake news", lies, etc. Discouraging but informative.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Joy Korones

    Finished in four hours. Terrifying: do not read before bed! I wish I could use this in my AP classroom...

  24. 5 out of 5

    Steve Wilson

    Timely read in these strange political times. Well researched and annotated. While the book will not help you differentiate between fact and fiction it does provide context and background as to how truth and transparency has seemingly eroded over time. At times the book may be overly academic but overall is highly readable. Should be a must read for all who have an interest in politics but unfortunately those who most need to read this book will be the least likely to do so.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Kathy

    “Trump, of course, is a troll - both by temperament and by habit. His tweets and offhand taunts are the very essence of trolling - the lies, the scorn, the invective, the trash talk, and the rabid non-sequiturs of an angry, aggrieved, isolated, and deeply self-absorbed adolescent who lives in a self-constructed bubble and gets the attention he craves from bashing his enemies and trailing clouds of outrage and dismay in his path.”

  26. 4 out of 5

    Charles

    “We live in a time when the very idea of objective truth is mocked and discounted by the occupants of the White House,” Michiko Kakutani tells us in this brilliant, penetrating treatise into the rise of Trumpism, the valuation of ignorance over knowledge, emotion over reason, how racist ideologies have risen from what one might have mistakenly supposed the grave. And how Orwell’s 1984 and Huxley’s Brave New World threaten to become, in many ways, America in 2018. But, she notes, in her erudite v “We live in a time when the very idea of objective truth is mocked and discounted by the occupants of the White House,” Michiko Kakutani tells us in this brilliant, penetrating treatise into the rise of Trumpism, the valuation of ignorance over knowledge, emotion over reason, how racist ideologies have risen from what one might have mistakenly supposed the grave. And how Orwell’s 1984 and Huxley’s Brave New World threaten to become, in many ways, America in 2018. But, she notes, in her erudite voyage of how we got to where we are, this was foreseen by the founders of this nation. “George Washington’s farewell address of 1796 was eerily clairvoyant about the dangers America now faces. In order to protect its future, the young country must guard its Constitution and remain vigilant about efforts to sabotage the separation and balance of powers within the government that he and the other founders had so carefully crafted. Washington warned about the rise of ‘cunning, ambitious, and unprincipled men’ who might try ‘to subvert the power of the people’ and ‘usurp for themselves the reins of government, destroying afterwards the very engines which have lifted them to unjust dominion.’ He warned about ‘the insidious wiles of foreign influence’ and the dangers of ‘ambitious, corrupted, or deluded citizens’ … ‘who might devote themselves to a favorite foreign nation’ in order ‘to betray or sacrifice the interests’ of America.” (pp 169-170) Alexander Hamilton was equally prescient when he warned us about ---‘a man unprincipled in private life, bold in his temper, [who might] mount the hobby horse of popularity [and] flatter and fall in with all the non sense of the zealots of the day [to] throw things into confusion that he may ride the storm and direct the whirlwind.”(p 22) She draws from a wide swath of literature, across a number of disciplines, and sets out a rationale explaining just how such an event as we are undergoing, might occur. The book will disturb, enrage, perhaps shock, and depress readers as they follow her logical, yet thoroughly engaging voyage showing how truth has been systematically and successfully attacked, and lays bare the dangers confronting us. The book is replete with quotations and source references (33 pages of references in an appendix will leave even the most demanding reader satisfied). Kakutani does a brilliant job of painting the picture in clear, undeniable ways, so it this review will have more than my usual number of quotations from the book. If you’re wondering how this situation happened, try this, for example: “The assault on truth and reason that reached fever pitch in America during the first year of the Trump presidency had been incubating for years on the fringe right. . . The Trump campaign depicted itself as an insurgent, revolutionary force, using language which strangely echoed that used by radicals in the 1960’s” (pp 22 & 45). And just how dangerous is this? “’The ideal subject of totalitarian rule is people for whom the distinction between fact and fiction and the distinction between true and false no longer exists.’” [Hannah Arendt-The Origins of Totalitarianism.] (p 11) But Kakutani does not rely solely on the written word. “In Hypernormalisation, [2016 documentary movie] Adam Curtes, British filmmaker, showed people in the West had also stopped believing the stories politicians had been telling them for years—like the last years of the Soviet Union, where people both understood the absurdity of the propaganda the government had been selling them for decades and had difficulty envisioning any alternative—Trump realized that ‘in the face of that, you could play with reality’ and ‘further undermine and weaken the old forms of power’—he could, like the Russian Putin, ‘redefine reality on his own terms’--- “it’s a surprisingly short leap from rejecting political correctness to blaming women, immigrants, or Muslims for their problems.” (pp 85-87) She goes on to note how the co-opting of language, the rise of ever-more-inclusive filters, silos and tribes, our media-induced attention deficit disorder, and what the Rand Corporation has called “the firehose of falsehood” the “Putin model of propaganda” that the regime has put out---“to distract and exhaust…to wear down through such a profusion of lies that they cease to resist and retreat into their private lives --- an unremitting, high intensity stream of lies, partial truths, and complete fictions spewed forth with tireless aggression “to obliterate the truth and overwhelm and confuse anyone trying to pay attention.” (p 141) The connection she establishes between “the Putin model,” Lenin, Steve Bannon, and the Trump campaign and administration is chilling. But, with amazing prescience, the founders foresaw how “ambitious, corrupted, or deluded citizens” under “the insidious wiles of foreign influence”… “might devote themselves to a favorite foreign nation” in order to “throw things into confusion that he may ride the storm and direct the whirlwind” and in the process, “betray or sacrifice the interests of America.” They laid the foundation for us to resist this intrusion of totalitarianism into the great experiment that the United States is. Truth will die only if we let it. It is now up to us to “guard its Constitution and remain vigilant about efforts to sabotage the separation and balance of powers within the government.”

  27. 4 out of 5

    Nan

    Cataloging America's truth decay does not make for easy bedtime reading. While Kakutani does an excellent job of reiterating all the misrepresentations, falsehoods, and outright lies of the Trump administration, most of us have heard all of them before. Stacking them up in one volume makes the reader alternately despondent and outraged. The author's historical and cultural analysis is impressive, but more suggestions for how we might bring back truth and decency could have made this a stronger w Cataloging America's truth decay does not make for easy bedtime reading. While Kakutani does an excellent job of reiterating all the misrepresentations, falsehoods, and outright lies of the Trump administration, most of us have heard all of them before. Stacking them up in one volume makes the reader alternately despondent and outraged. The author's historical and cultural analysis is impressive, but more suggestions for how we might bring back truth and decency could have made this a stronger work.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Meredith

    Audiobook. Read with fierce conviction by the narrator. I don’t know what to say about this. If this book had focused its undoubted intelligence on the western trends in how information is absorbed, shared and disseminated, and on how over the past fifty years the West has started to collapse under the weight of its own bullshit, it would have been quite good. There were some decent comments on the nonsense of post-modernism. But alas, it’s another leftist diatribe punctuated by pseudo-intellect Audiobook. Read with fierce conviction by the narrator. I don’t know what to say about this. If this book had focused its undoubted intelligence on the western trends in how information is absorbed, shared and disseminated, and on how over the past fifty years the West has started to collapse under the weight of its own bullshit, it would have been quite good. There were some decent comments on the nonsense of post-modernism. But alas, it’s another leftist diatribe punctuated by pseudo-intellectual name-dropping and groaning on about how horrific and dishonest is Donald Trump. As if his election had come out of nowhere, not chosen by ordinary American citizens with a right to vote and sick to death of previous administrations, but instead magically placed on his presidential throne by a bunch of scheming Russian bots. I’m not a huge fan of Donald Trump’s coarse manners, but I did get rather tired of hearing him called a liar every thirty seconds or so, especially when the left has been employing exactly the same tactics for decades.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Brian

    It appears they give the Pulitzer Prize to anyone now. With more than thirty years of experience in matters of Truth, Ms. Kakutani should have been able to come up with a well researched Encyclopedia on one of the most important words in the English language, for which she received a degree in at Yale University, a recipe for cliche communist tendencies (see Naked Communist). Because of this, I don't know what's more sad: her politics poisoning everything she writes about or all the people that It appears they give the Pulitzer Prize to anyone now. With more than thirty years of experience in matters of Truth, Ms. Kakutani should have been able to come up with a well researched Encyclopedia on one of the most important words in the English language, for which she received a degree in at Yale University, a recipe for cliche communist tendencies (see Naked Communist). Because of this, I don't know what's more sad: her politics poisoning everything she writes about or all the people that agree with her sensationalist writing. But, what I do know, is that using her credentials in this manner is immoral. She could have discussed false reporting in the media, cherry picking data in research and how that leads to misleading results, advertising, and more. But it appears that Michiko has dollar signs in her eyes and real journalism isn't as sexy, maybe something she learned having a crush on Trump.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Emanuel

    It's clear, incisive and a brisk read, but if you've been paying attention to the news, there's really not a lot here that's new. Kakutani adds some philosophical and literary context (I especially enjoyed her drawing a connection between postmodernism and today's current indifference to truth) that I found consistently fascinating, but her constant recounting of recent events left me a little bored. It's also profoundly dispiriting stuff, but again if you've been paying attention to the news, t It's clear, incisive and a brisk read, but if you've been paying attention to the news, there's really not a lot here that's new. Kakutani adds some philosophical and literary context (I especially enjoyed her drawing a connection between postmodernism and today's current indifference to truth) that I found consistently fascinating, but her constant recounting of recent events left me a little bored. It's also profoundly dispiriting stuff, but again if you've been paying attention to the news, that's nothing new either.

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