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William Shakespeare's Jedi the Last: Star Wars Part the Eighth

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William Shakespeare's Jedi the Last


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William Shakespeare's Jedi the Last

30 review for William Shakespeare's Jedi the Last: Star Wars Part the Eighth

  1. 5 out of 5

    Khurram

    I loved this book. I admit I do not know all the pros and official structure of Shakespeare, but I did recognized some of the lines and more famous passages that had been re-purposed, and they fit perfectly into this story. Like the Empire Strikes Back I think this book and Rogue One, are the best candidates for the Shakespeare treatment. The dark themes really do come out here. I really like the "asides" in this story, these were spot on in getting the characters across for me. Ian Doescher did a I loved this book. I admit I do not know all the pros and official structure of Shakespeare, but I did recognized some of the lines and more famous passages that had been re-purposed, and they fit perfectly into this story. Like the Empire Strikes Back I think this book and Rogue One, are the best candidates for the Shakespeare treatment. The dark themes really do come out here. I really like the "asides" in this story, these were spot on in getting the characters across for me. Ian Doescher did a great job on this conversion, however you have to be in the Star Wars fans side that already liked The Last Jedi, This will not do much to convert people that did not like the movie. For me I agree with Ian's assessment in the acknowledgement page. One of the things we both loved about the Last Jedi, was it would get to a point I was sure was going to be the cliffhanger ending but it just kept going, and getting better. Even knowing what was going the happen I still got goosebumps on these parts of the book. I loved the illustrations in the book as well. Like any book book it enhanced my experience. Also I think fans of Shakespeare will love this finding easter eggs of his hidden lines, there are also these for Star Wars fans.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Melissa

    I still love these, the pinnacle of geekdom I know, Star Wars retold as a Shakespearean play, you’d think it’d be old now that we’re on the 8th installment, but no Doescher still throws surprises into these and you can tell he’s having fun. Chewy talks, R2 snarks, Yoda uses Haiku, Poe sneaks in some of his literary namesake, and then you’ll be reading along and realize there’s some Donne, a homage to Ian Fleming, the murderers dialogue straight from a Shakespearean tragedy. No matter how many I I still love these, the pinnacle of geekdom I know, Star Wars retold as a Shakespearean play, you’d think it’d be old now that we’re on the 8th installment, but no Doescher still throws surprises into these and you can tell he’s having fun. Chewy talks, R2 snarks, Yoda uses Haiku, Poe sneaks in some of his literary namesake, and then you’ll be reading along and realize there’s some Donne, a homage to Ian Fleming, the murderers dialogue straight from a Shakespearean tragedy. No matter how many I catch, I know I’m missing even more and thankfully he tells us some of his Easter eggs (for lack of a better word) at the end. And yes, when the audiobook comes out, I’ll listen to it again.🤪

  3. 5 out of 5

    Jason

    Warning: Spoilers abound in this, but I believe that anyone who wants to see The Last Jedi has already done so at this point, and thus I don't feel the need to hide the review. Proceed at your own risk Another fun triumph from Mr. Doescher. 4.5 stars. This did to The Last Jedi what The Phantom of Menace did to The Phantom Menace, and that's improve it. The Last Jedi had some elements that annoyed me, specifically too much silliness in the first half and a couple of annoying characters. But for s Warning: Spoilers abound in this, but I believe that anyone who wants to see The Last Jedi has already done so at this point, and thus I don't feel the need to hide the review. Proceed at your own risk Another fun triumph from Mr. Doescher. 4.5 stars. This did to The Last Jedi what The Phantom of Menace did to The Phantom Menace, and that's improve it. The Last Jedi had some elements that annoyed me, specifically too much silliness in the first half and a couple of annoying characters. But for some reason what makes me frown in the movie works wonderfully in a Shakespearean play. Take Poe and Hux's (or "Gen'ral Hugs" as Poe calls him a couple of times) exchange at the beginning. Poe: "Hux spell'd with H, a slender, pasty fellow. Well educated, with rare pow'r of mind, And yet infected with misanthropy." The scene was kind of fun in the film... I guess... at least I make excuses for it. I certainly don't hate it, but it shows what a boastful buffoon Hux can be. Can you see Darth Vader in that conversation? No, because Darth Vader wouldn't even take the call; he'd just blow Poe to hell and then start working on the rest of the fleet. The bombers would never have had a chance to get within range of a Star Destroyer. But that's neither here nor there because this isn't Poe and Vader, it's Poe and Hux, and it's quite humorous in bard-speak, especially since all of Poe's lines in this book refer to Edgar Allan Poe instead of just any number of poets like in the last book. I'm hardly an Edgar Allan Poe expert, but I caught a few references. Here are a few lines I enjoyed. Snoke upon discovering Hux has botched it all again: "My disappointment in thy performance Can ne'er be overstated. Speak, thou imp!" Leia expressing her irritation with Poe's inability to follow orders: "The man would move a saint to shout and curse-- And I, we may be sure, am not a saint." Yoda, who still speaks in haiku, commenting on the sacred Jedi texts: "Read them hast thou, then? Neither page turners they were, Nor hit folios." DJ's stutter is portrayed in a more interesting manner in this: "Don't, does he, do not judge me by my raiment. Long have I been familiar with the codes The shrewd First Order useth. Yea, long time, Is, is it, if the price is right, I'll break Ye into sneak snake snuck Snoke's private chamber." Rose (one of the aforementioned annoying characters) puts a new spin on an old saw: "They who would beg cannot the choosers be!" (That's still not as fun as the twist a very young cousin gave it years ago which has since fallen into family lore. According to her "the bakers are the choosers.)" Phasma refers to a metal in all of her lines: "Stop, traitor! Into death thou shalt be lead!" That particular one's pushing it since I think it technically should be "led," but if it's good enough for Stan Laurel, then it's good enough for Phasma. "You can lead a horse to water, but a pencil must be lead." I really like Phasma in this because she shows how she got to be a captain. She's pretty badass in her fight and probably would've won had the ship not been blowing up around her. Yet I wonder how she ever managed to keep her life, let alone her job, after the last movie. She wasn't 100% responsible for the destruction of Starkiller Base, but the resistance never could've pulled it off without her. It seems like someone at her level would be willing to die before lowering the shields for the enemy to come in and blow everything up, but I digress again. More Poe from Poe: "Well, let us hope the thickness of the thing Will be enow to keep the enemies Who shall be tapping at our chamber door, At least until we can some help secure." And even though the whole Finn/Rose thing is all sentimental, dramatic, stupid, and whatnot, we get another famous line just begging to be used, and Doescher doesn't disappoint: "Fine lass, a Rose by any other name Would never smell as sweet as thou, dear friend." Snoke gets another famous one when he expires: "Et tu, brute Kylo! Then fall, Leader Snoke." I would love to include something for Kylo Ren and Luke, but nothing they said stood out. Ren gives another villanelle, and Luke gets Prospero's entire final speech from The Tempest since the characters are so similar. This is nothing I know offhand; I read the afterword. I've never read The Tempest. By the by, I suggest reading the afterword before reading the play as usual so you know what to be on the lookout for. Rey has acrostics in her longer soliloquies. She also has an extremely impressive soliloquy when she's doing this scene: I'm not going to post it here, though I will give the acrostic below. It's 36 lines long, and each line has a single "R" in it. It's the first letter in the first line, the second in the second line, and so on until it's the 36th in the 36th line. You can watch the R's move to the right as they fall, and it's really neat. The first letters of each line form this sentence: "Rey's tale belike would make the masses yawn." And speaking of acrostics, we now come to my favorite part, hands down. The master codebreaker: He has no lines in the movie, but he makes a speech for his lady friends as well as the audience in this book, and said speech might as well be James Bondified since the plot goes to such pains to make sure he looks like James Bond as portrayed in Goldfinger (not to mention Indiana Jones in The Temple of Doom who is played by Harrison Ford who also plays Han Solo). How many cross references are we going to get here? Anyway, I'll leave you with the speech with the important parts emboldened for those who aren't major Bond fans. I am no doctor, no, but codebreaker, Now comes my tale from Canto Bright with love. These skill'd gold fingers mine are us'd to crack Encryptions strong as thunder, balls of lightning. Right is it said: one only liveth twice: Not once upon her mag'sty's secret service Am I e'er found, for diamonds are forever-- 'Tis money's my joy. Live and let th'die roll! I'm th'man who hath the golden gunnysack-- Once loyal to the spy who lov'd me but Now loyal to the gold moon. Rake her in! Again I'll win for thine eyes only, pet. Let me get thee unlock'd--O puss, e'en so! (Methinks though ought to ne'er say ne'er again.) A double! Ha, view two! A killing I Now make. Yea, I shall roll the living daylights Out of these dice, no lie. Sense to kill I've, For with a golden eye comes golden sight. My money proves tomorrow never dies-- Yea, e'en the world is not enough for me. So let me die another day--tonight, To this casino, royal shall I be! E'en so, a quantum of solace I'll give, Respecting those who lose. O sky, fall low-- Yea, ev'ry specter of a code I'll break. If you liked the others in this series, then this one is sure to please you as well. Check it out.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Matt

    The fallout from the First Order’s destruction of the New Republic’s capital and the Resistance’s destruction of her enemy’s superweapon even as they look to bring Luke Skywalker back in William Shakespeare’s Jedi the Last by Ian Doescher. Beginning almost immediately after the previous film, the middle installment of the sequel trilogy finds the First Order looking to takeout the remnant of their opponents only this adaptation is not on screen or a book but on the stage in Elizabethan prose as The fallout from the First Order’s destruction of the New Republic’s capital and the Resistance’s destruction of her enemy’s superweapon even as they look to bring Luke Skywalker back in William Shakespeare’s Jedi the Last by Ian Doescher. Beginning almost immediately after the previous film, the middle installment of the sequel trilogy finds the First Order looking to takeout the remnant of their opponents only this adaptation is not on screen or a book but on the stage in Elizabethan prose as Shakespeare would have written. Adapting The Last Jedi was definitely the hardest Star Wars film that Doescher had to deal with because of the how awful the Rian Johnson written-direction film is. There is only so much Doescher could do to make this adaptation to make it readable, unlike The Phantom of Menace in which he only had to develop Jar Jar Binks. He had to salvage so many poorly written characters, including those long established like Leia and Luke as those newly introduced, that to even have this published in a timely manner meant he could only polish them so much. Since this is a review of the adaptation and not the film, I will applaud the excellent work Doescher did in making the at times bad dialogue into some more passable, the continuation of footnoting translations of Chewbecca’s few lines, and great narratives for the fight scenes. However I must also commend Doescher for the wonderful easter eggs in reference to James Bond, Rogue One, and yes the sly acknowledgements that Johnson underdeveloped or ruined so many characters in particular Rey. Jedi the Last is the most controversial film of the franchise and Ian Doescher did the best job he could in making it into a passable stage play in the style of William Shakespeare. As a result my rating is celebration of Doescher’s hardwork and like the rest of the Star Wars fandom we look for to what he must deal with in Episode IX.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Zach

    Excellent as always. A hilarious version of a not so good movie that manages to make it enjoyable and fun. Shakespeare and Star Wars work so well together. Doescher is a genius. Would highly recommend.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Tung

    I’ll repeat some of what I wrote in my reviews of Doescher’s other books: I’m a massive Star Wars fan; additionally, I love Shakespeare, so a book that combines these two things hits me square in my wheelhouse. This book imagines Star Wars, Episode VIII: The Last Jedi as a Shakespearean play told in iambic pentameter, complete with acts, scenes, asides, and so forth. Many of the lines of dialogue are simply reinvented lines from the movie told in old English (“Each word thou speakest was entirel I’ll repeat some of what I wrote in my reviews of Doescher’s other books: I’m a massive Star Wars fan; additionally, I love Shakespeare, so a book that combines these two things hits me square in my wheelhouse. This book imagines Star Wars, Episode VIII: The Last Jedi as a Shakespearean play told in iambic pentameter, complete with acts, scenes, asides, and so forth. Many of the lines of dialogue are simply reinvented lines from the movie told in old English (“Each word thou speakest was entirely false. The good rebellion is reborn today, the war hath just begun, and nay, I shall not be Jedi the last.”). Doescher does more than simply translate every line of the movie into Shakespearean prose, however. He creates scenes and monologues to complement and supplement the movie lines. For example, towards the end of the Last Jedi movie, there is a scene where all hopes seems lost, and Leia resignedly concedes defeat. In the book, she expresses that resignation with a tremendous soliloquy that reflects on her impact throughout the entire rebellion from New Hope on; she even ponders what her legacy will be post death – which is such a sweet tribute to Carrie Fisher’s actual death and impact on the franchise. It’s tremendous. In addition, Doescher adds some fanservice. There is a very clever monologue given to the codebreaker at Canto Bight that plays off of his James Bond-esque look from the movie. I also want to call out Doescher’s brilliant use of Prospero’s closing soliloquy from The Tempest for Luke Skywalker – given both Prospero and Luke were island exiles. Overall, this is my favorite of Doescher’s eight Shakespearean Star Wars books. Fans of Star Wars will appreciate this; fans of Shakespeare will appreciate this; fans of both will LOVE this. One of my top books of the year.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Sarina

    Shakespearen Star Wars sounds like a concept that’s great in theory but not-so-great in practice. At least, that’s what I thought before I read William Shakespeare’s Jedi the Last. Well, consider me convinced that Star Wars and Shakespeare actually do go well together. I did not expect to love this book as much as I really, really did. There were cleverly written homages to Shakespeare’s works, drawings of Star Wars characters dressed in garb from Shakespeare’s time, and monologues that expand Shakespearen Star Wars sounds like a concept that’s great in theory but not-so-great in practice. At least, that’s what I thought before I read William Shakespeare’s Jedi the Last. Well, consider me convinced that Star Wars and Shakespeare actually do go well together. I did not expect to love this book as much as I really, really did. There were cleverly written homages to Shakespeare’s works, drawings of Star Wars characters dressed in garb from Shakespeare’s time, and monologues that expanded on what my favorite characters from the movie (among them Paige Tico, Luke, and Rey) were thinking and feeling. Doescher met challenges posed by the film with amazing creativity. My one complaint is that Rey has the three bun hairstyle in all the drawings of her even though her hairstyle changed in this movie. I find it hard to believe that it was an accident, but how could it have been intentional? But that’s really only a minor complaint. Overall, I am content that this book is on my bookshelf, allowing me to return to it whenever I need a break from reality.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Erikka

    I'm enamored of these books. They are just so well done! The codebreakers 007 speech (read it down as well) was a particular gem, as well as Luke's "prosperous" death. But my favorite part had to be the two troopers pointing out a plot hole in a very Rosenkrantz and Guildenstern way. This was a great one!

  9. 5 out of 5

    Will Plunkett

    I must be getting better at "reading" these books: I will admit to the cheat of reading the Afterword first this time, but only one of the "Easter eggs" was one I didn't figure out on my own. As always, the two (usually) Imperials/guards/Troopers who give their peons'-level insights of larger worldviews, and the non-human characters' dialogue were the best parts; trying to figure out the acrostics is fun. Would the title William Shakespeare's Last (or Eighth) Knight have worked instead?

  10. 4 out of 5

    Carrie

    These are a delight! Sometimes better than the movies.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Pilar Erika

    The author shows a good knowledge both of Star Wars and of Shakespeare's plays. And that is the reason why Ian Doescher makes so good an imitation of Shakespeare's style of writing in a science-fiction narrative. A great work, in which Ian Doescher seeks to make both Star Wars and Shakespeare followers smile and have a good time reading it.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Daniel Shellenbarger

    I'm not one of those people that hated the Last Jedi. I thought it did the best it could with a bad hand after JJ Abrams made a real mess with his overly-nostalgic/under-thought Force Awakens, so I didn't come into this book with that sort of baggage; I'd go so far as to say I thought (apart from a couple plot holes (and everything to do with Holdo)) it was a really good movie. Even so, I didn't really enjoy this book as much as others in the series, partly I think it was because, as with The Fo I'm not one of those people that hated the Last Jedi. I thought it did the best it could with a bad hand after JJ Abrams made a real mess with his overly-nostalgic/under-thought Force Awakens, so I didn't come into this book with that sort of baggage; I'd go so far as to say I thought (apart from a couple plot holes (and everything to do with Holdo)) it was a really good movie. Even so, I didn't really enjoy this book as much as others in the series, partly I think it was because, as with The Force Doth Awaken, Doescher is working with incomplete information. His earlier books worked best because Doescher was able to use the expanded canon and later movies to give outside perspectives to explain much of what was under-explained or plot-hole-ish. However, these later stories, working off JJ Abrams slapdash world-building and recycled plots, are full of massive holes and random fan-servicing subplots that could use development but the answers for which just aren't yet available. The biggest is quite obvious, WHY DIDN'T HOLDO TALK TO POE AND THE CREW? I'm not saying she should've gotten his blessing, but a leader has a responsibility to demonstrate competence and saying "believe in me" as things continuously deteriorate with no evidence to the contrary is the mark of an egomaniac, a fool, or someone who has given up already rather than a wise leader. Trust goes both ways. The problem is that I don't think even Doescher can conceive a reason why this supposedly veteran commander acts in such a nonsensical way after assuming command of people WHO DON'T KNOW HER. Captain Bligh showed better command sense! On the other hand, Doescher does address the elephant of Luke's apparition on Crait with a bit of amusing banter between stormtroopers, and on the whole this is a worthy addition to the series, it's just that I feel like these might've been better served if Mr. Doescher had waited until the new trilogy was complete so he could fill out the story with characters asides, as he did with the first two trilogies. Just saying. Even so, Doescher's grasp of Shakespearean English and literary tricks are awe inspiring and delightful in equal measures, and make this a worthy read regardless of its short-comings.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Ben Truong

    William Shakespeare's Jedi the Last is written by Ian Doescher and inspired by William Shakespeare and Star Wars: The Last Jedi. It is the seventh chronologically and published in the William Shakespeare's Star War series. I was glad that Doescher would continue his William Shakespeare's Star Wars series with the sequels too. He has done such a wonderful job with the original and surprisingly with the prequel trilogies as well that I knew that he would do the same with the sequel trilogy. So, it William Shakespeare's Jedi the Last is written by Ian Doescher and inspired by William Shakespeare and Star Wars: The Last Jedi. It is the seventh chronologically and published in the William Shakespeare's Star War series. I was glad that Doescher would continue his William Shakespeare's Star Wars series with the sequels too. He has done such a wonderful job with the original and surprisingly with the prequel trilogies as well that I knew that he would do the same with the sequel trilogy. So, it wasn't a surprise that I loved William Shakespeare's Jedi the Last as well. For the most part Doescher is rather faithful to the source – except it is more humorous than I remembered the original film, but I think this might be par for the course with this series. Again, I will freely admit that I'm no Elizabethan English or Shakespearean expert, but I find that the transformation of the dialogue into Elizabethan English was rather well done. Again, I wouldn't call Doescher Shakespeare, but he is awfully close. William Shakespeare's Jedi the Last is a nearly perfect amalgamation of Star Wars and iambic pentameter. You can really see Doescher growth in his Elizabethan writing – it seems that with each trilogy he gets stronger in his writing, which benefits the Sequel Trilogy greatly. It is interesting to read the relationship between Rey and Luke Skywalker. It was also good to read Yoda in his haiku manner again – even though it was short and he returned as a ghost. All in all, William Shakespeare's Jedi the Last was written rather well and a very interesting rendition of Star Wars: The Last Jedi written in Elizabethan English.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Baker St Shelves

    Another great book in the Shakespeare/Star Wars mashup! Covering all the events of Last Jedi, a movie that I loved (Don’t @ me.) This book does more than just retell the story in Elizabethan prose, it also gives characters like Chewbacca and R2 lines of dialogue, internal dialogue and asides so that we can understand every motivation and thought process. Plus all the ways the writer uses language and the written word to his advantage, which is apparent in the whole series. So glad to read this!

  15. 4 out of 5

    Emma

    I wasn't that big a fan of the movie Star Wars Episode VIII: The Last Jedi. You may be thinking, if that's true, why did I even bother to read this book? Well, I read the other seven, so I felt I had to at least give this one a chance. And I'm not sure if it'll change my opinion of the movie, but I did find it to be a nice read in and of itself.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Benjamin

    Another wonderful installment of Star Wars set to the Shakespearean style. Once again, I love the unique aspect of each character’s dialog. DJ’s stutter from the movie was made unique and added interest and depth to his character. There’s a lot to love about The Last Jedi, and Jedi the Last highlights everything—and more—in such a way that is riveting, emotional, and all around fun.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Thomas Myers

    Ian Doescher does it again! This cross-genre blending succeeds in a grand fashion, and the author takes an amazing story and makes it even better. I don't love how he repeats some of his speech patterns and use of Irony, but overall it's really fun.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Gordon Arthur

    Verily, 'tis another triumph.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer Baratta

    Shakespeare and Star wars fans will enjoy this book.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Joanne

    Pure geeky fun for fans of the Bard and Star Wars.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Jessica

    With every play, I become more and more convinced that the Star Wars Universe and the Shakespearean world are one and the same.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Aaron White

    Once again, so well-written, well-researched. Ian is a superstar at this and he is so good to his fans. I loved this book as much as the rest.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Amy

    Consistent quality. I really enjoy this series.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Dennis Keithly

    This is a book I received as a gift. It is a fun read and another enjoyable take on The Last Jedi. The Shakespearean verse adds some humor and there are plenty of fun Easter eggs to find.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Jose F. Martin del Pozo

    Again Ian Doescher done it hath, Jedi The Last in verse like Shakespeare writt'n for us!

  26. 5 out of 5

    Alex Tiethoff

    Ian Doescher continues to deliver fun and with with Jedi the Last. His Shakespearean renditions of the Star Wars film will somehow leave you longing to rewatch them and read Shakespeare, which is what a good book should do, right?! Highly recommended for SW nerds and Shakespeare nerds--and...just nerds in general.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Jason Edwards

  28. 4 out of 5

    Jeremy Heckman

  29. 4 out of 5

    Shannon McCarter

  30. 4 out of 5

    Angelia

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