kode adsense disini
Hot Best Seller

We Rise, We Resist, We Raise Our Voices

Availability: Ready to download

Fifty of the foremost diverse children's authors and illustrators--including Jason Reynolds, Jacqueline Woodson, and Kwame Alexander--share answers to the question, "In this divisive world, what shall we tell our children?" in this beautiful, full-color keepsake collection, published in partnership with Just Us Books. What do we tell our children when the world seems bleak, Fifty of the foremost diverse children's authors and illustrators--including Jason Reynolds, Jacqueline Woodson, and Kwame Alexander--share answers to the question, "In this divisive world, what shall we tell our children?" in this beautiful, full-color keepsake collection, published in partnership with Just Us Books. What do we tell our children when the world seems bleak, and prejudice and racism run rampant? With 96 lavishly designed pages of original art and prose, fifty diverse creators lend voice to young activists. Featuring poems, letters, personal essays, art, and other works from such industry leaders as Jacqueline Woodson (Brown Girl Dreaming), Jason Reynolds (All American Boys), Kwame Alexander (The Crossover), Andrea Pippins (I Love My Hair), Sharon Draper (Out of My Mind), Rita Williams-Garcia (One Crazy Summer), Ellen Oh (cofounder of We Need Diverse Books), and artists Ekua Holmes, Rafael Lopez, James Ransome, Javaka Steptoe, and more, this anthology empowers the nation's youth to listen, learn, and build a better tomorrow.


Compare
kode adsense disini

Fifty of the foremost diverse children's authors and illustrators--including Jason Reynolds, Jacqueline Woodson, and Kwame Alexander--share answers to the question, "In this divisive world, what shall we tell our children?" in this beautiful, full-color keepsake collection, published in partnership with Just Us Books. What do we tell our children when the world seems bleak, Fifty of the foremost diverse children's authors and illustrators--including Jason Reynolds, Jacqueline Woodson, and Kwame Alexander--share answers to the question, "In this divisive world, what shall we tell our children?" in this beautiful, full-color keepsake collection, published in partnership with Just Us Books. What do we tell our children when the world seems bleak, and prejudice and racism run rampant? With 96 lavishly designed pages of original art and prose, fifty diverse creators lend voice to young activists. Featuring poems, letters, personal essays, art, and other works from such industry leaders as Jacqueline Woodson (Brown Girl Dreaming), Jason Reynolds (All American Boys), Kwame Alexander (The Crossover), Andrea Pippins (I Love My Hair), Sharon Draper (Out of My Mind), Rita Williams-Garcia (One Crazy Summer), Ellen Oh (cofounder of We Need Diverse Books), and artists Ekua Holmes, Rafael Lopez, James Ransome, Javaka Steptoe, and more, this anthology empowers the nation's youth to listen, learn, and build a better tomorrow.

30 review for We Rise, We Resist, We Raise Our Voices

  1. 5 out of 5

    Donalyn

    Outstanding #ownvoices collection of poems, essays, and illustrations.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Kristina Lenarczyk

    I really enjoyed this collection, it was a very quick read that I picked up while waiting to board my flight home from NYC. There were a lot of writers and creators I hadn't seen or read from before, so I am interested in checking out some more works from a few of them! What I enjoyed the most about this anthology was its diversity in theme and presentation, each entry was unique and I loved getting more exposure into some of the poetry and artwork styles that were included. Overall, I really enj I really enjoyed this collection, it was a very quick read that I picked up while waiting to board my flight home from NYC. There were a lot of writers and creators I hadn't seen or read from before, so I am interested in checking out some more works from a few of them! What I enjoyed the most about this anthology was its diversity in theme and presentation, each entry was unique and I loved getting more exposure into some of the poetry and artwork styles that were included. Overall, I really enjoyed this anthology and would recommend it to readers of any age! It is short which makes it a very quick read, and bright and colourful in a way that makes you want to keep turning the page. If you are looking for a fun but important coffee table book, I would recommend this one! http://theprincessgummybearreviews.bl...

  3. 4 out of 5

    Mary Lee

    I haven't finished reading every word of every page, but it seems prophetic to open this book (library copy--will be buying multiples for my classroom) right after finishing TROUBLEMAKERS, which gives us a new lens and new ways to define the students who RISE RESIST and RAISE THEIR VOICES. I can't wait to begin shining a spotlight on the ways voices have historically been raised in response to the wrongs of the world. Thank you to the authors and illustrators of this collection for giving us just wh I haven't finished reading every word of every page, but it seems prophetic to open this book (library copy--will be buying multiples for my classroom) right after finishing TROUBLEMAKERS, which gives us a new lens and new ways to define the students who RISE RESIST and RAISE THEIR VOICES. I can't wait to begin shining a spotlight on the ways voices have historically been raised in response to the wrongs of the world. Thank you to the authors and illustrators of this collection for giving us just what our young people (and their teachers) need.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Mary Ann

    Above all, this collection leave me with the feeling that there are caring adults who truly see children, who know how difficult these times can be, and who admire all the ways that our children walk in this world. Authors ask questions, share wisdom and provide support. By doing so, they open the window to talking about these difficult times. In the opening poem, Wade Hudson asks: "What shall we tell you when our world sometimes seems dark and uninviting? What shall we tell you when hateful words Above all, this collection leave me with the feeling that there are caring adults who truly see children, who know how difficult these times can be, and who admire all the ways that our children walk in this world. Authors ask questions, share wisdom and provide support. By doing so, they open the window to talking about these difficult times. In the opening poem, Wade Hudson asks: "What shall we tell you when our world sometimes seems dark and uninviting? What shall we tell you when hateful words that wound and bully are thrown like bricks against a wall, shattering into debris?" I especially appreciate the variety in this collection. These are heavy topics, and yet readers turn the pages and find so many different approaches. Jacqueline Woodson writes a letter to her children, reminding them to be safe and be kind as they walk in the world. Joseph Bruchac gives advice about choosing a friend who "sees how beautiful you are, even on days when you're sad." Zetta Elliott reminds children that "You Too Can Fly." The illustrations move from painting with deep hues, to drawings with soft warm touch, to photographs showing children of different races and ethnicities. I definitely recommend this collection for every elementary and middle school library. I'll be bringing it to my new high school library to see what our students think of it.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Carol

    Heartfelt advice and inspiration for young readers feeling discouraged by the current atrocious political climate and/or dealing with bullying based on their heritage and/or skin color. There are a variety of authors, formats, and illustrations/photographs that bring encouragement and motivation for kids to lift their voices and get involved, but to also know at the end of the day that you're loved and not alone.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Joy Kirr

    I asked my students to think of a time they were made fun of, and for what reason. Then I read Ellen Oh's letter (two pages from this great book) to my students. They sat there - listening! We need to read and share these stories full of great advice.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Julie Overpeck aka Mrs. O's Library

    With a country so divided, children naturally notice the tension and fear the future. Editors Wade Hudson and Cheryl Willis Hudson wanted to combat this hopelessness, so they asked many diverse artists to create works that would address the future. The result is a magnificent collection of creative works--poems, letters, essays, illustrations--that give hope and impart wisdom to today's children, especially children of color. It is a tender embrace of encouragement and hope from today's artists With a country so divided, children naturally notice the tension and fear the future. Editors Wade Hudson and Cheryl Willis Hudson wanted to combat this hopelessness, so they asked many diverse artists to create works that would address the future. The result is a magnificent collection of creative works--poems, letters, essays, illustrations--that give hope and impart wisdom to today's children, especially children of color. It is a tender embrace of encouragement and hope from today's artists to our young people.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Kevin Hodgson

    Powerful poems, stories and letters to remind us and our children that a path is still ahead, as difficult as it sometimes seems during these current years of political turmoil.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Kris Patrick

    Beautiful content. I wish the text size was larger.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Linda

    Perhaps to describe this book, I will use words from the forward by Ashley Bryan: "I'm sure just to touch this book, We Rise, We Resist, We Raise Our Voices, will lift your spirits." Editors Wade Hudson and Cheryl Willis Hudson tell in their introduction that they were inspired by their seven-year-old granddaughter who was so upset by the result of the 2016 presidential election. They write that she was frightened and confused, worried that her world would change. They asked themselves what coul Perhaps to describe this book, I will use words from the forward by Ashley Bryan: "I'm sure just to touch this book, We Rise, We Resist, We Raise Our Voices, will lift your spirits." Editors Wade Hudson and Cheryl Willis Hudson tell in their introduction that they were inspired by their seven-year-old granddaughter who was so upset by the result of the 2016 presidential election. They write that she was frightened and confused, worried that her world would change. They asked themselves what could they tell her, what words of comfort could they offer? They have gathered thirty authors and nearly that many illustrators for each double-page piece to give those words of inspiration and love and hope. There is a poem by Carole Boston Weatherford, illustrated by Jeffery B. Weatherford that speaks of The Golden Rule. Kwame Alexander writes his story, illustrated by Ekua Holmes, about a night while getting ice cream with his daughter and the worry she has on the way. The editors each share a piece, Wade questions "What Shall We Tell You? with a poignant portrait of mother and child by Floyd Cooper accompanying it. Cheryl shares a quilt she created to illustrate the song, 'The Gospel Train': "The fare is cheap and all can go./The rich and poor are there./No second-class on board the train,/no difference in the fare." Ellen Oh, Margarita Engle, Hena Khan. . . I could continue on. Each piece is stunning in its message, beautiful in its art. There are brief biographies of each contributor, photo credits, and an index at the back. There is also a table of contents. I imagine how wonderful it would be to read and discuss one of these pieces each morning with a class. I have read parts to my granddaughters (seven and nine) and it's a pleasure to enjoy with them, too.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Laura Gardner

    🌟🌟🌟🌟🌟/5 for WE RISE, WE RESIST, WE RAISE OUR VOICES . 〰 〰 WE RISE is a gorgeous collection of poetry, art and essays on the topic of social justice. This inspiring and affirming anthology encourages students to believe in themselves, be kind, stand up and speak out. A love letter to young people struggling in a season of hate and exclusivity, this book is sure to have something for everyone who is struggling -- immigrant children who fear their parents will be deported, young black children who have 🌟🌟🌟🌟🌟/5 for WE RISE, WE RESIST, WE RAISE OUR VOICES . 〰️ 〰️ WE RISE is a gorgeous collection of poetry, art and essays on the topic of social justice. This inspiring and affirming anthology encourages students to believe in themselves, be kind, stand up and speak out. A love letter to young people struggling in a season of hate and exclusivity, this book is sure to have something for everyone who is struggling -- immigrant children who fear their parents will be deported, young black children who have been taught to hate the color of their skin, Muslim children who have been told to "go home" and more. . 〰️ 〰️ Essays like "You Can Change the World" by Bernette G. Ford explain the fight for Civil Rights in the 1960s and effectively put the current struggle in context. Jacqueline Woodson's (@jacqueline_woodson) highly personal letter to her two children to exhort them to be kind even "when the world feels like it has lost its mind, when leaders don't feel like leaders, when adults lie and bully..." . 〰️ 〰️ Authors and artists are from a range of backgrounds including Black, Native American, Asian American, Latinx; their extensive biographies in the end of the book will likely inspire new fans of their work. Luminaries and award winners such as Sharon G. Flake, Jason Reynolds (@jasonreynolds83), Joseph Bruchac, Margarita Engle and Carole Boston Weatherford are included. This is a must-purchase for every library and will make an excellent read aloud and mentor text.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Chelsey

    Wonderful concept, lovely art.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Alicia

    Wait??! Hold up! I'm talking about collections again? Yes, yes I am. These collections are superb, this one focused on a middle grade voice, but absolutely relevant for all ages. Poems, verse, short stories, design and illustration to compliment the words. Actions and voices raised. Moments of resistance and topics to speak up about? All boxes checked. Fabulous and timely authors, check. Vibrant front cover, check. Did I already hand it off to others? Check. It's got some of my favorite people in Wait??! Hold up! I'm talking about collections again? Yes, yes I am. These collections are superb, this one focused on a middle grade voice, but absolutely relevant for all ages. Poems, verse, short stories, design and illustration to compliment the words. Actions and voices raised. Moments of resistance and topics to speak up about? All boxes checked. Fabulous and timely authors, check. Vibrant front cover, check. Did I already hand it off to others? Check. It's got some of my favorite people in there and they work their magic to do everything in this collection that Hudson wanted to and that the collective should be proud of. Heartfelt and powerful examples on raising our voices and being heard.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Dayna

    I am in love with this book and its gorgeous art. It’s a series of short stories, essays, letters, and more from various authors (many children’s, middle grade, and YA). This compilation is perfect to help explain what is going on in the country these days, while grounding today’s struggles and resistance in history (especially the civil rights era). I would recommend this book to parents and teachers of middle grade readers, who are struggling to talk to kids about the racism, murder by police, I am in love with this book and its gorgeous art. It’s a series of short stories, essays, letters, and more from various authors (many children’s, middle grade, and YA). This compilation is perfect to help explain what is going on in the country these days, while grounding today’s struggles and resistance in history (especially the civil rights era). I would recommend this book to parents and teachers of middle grade readers, who are struggling to talk to kids about the racism, murder by police, anti-immigration sentiment, and the other depressing stories they are hearing in the news. It maintains a hopeful tone while preparing readers to speak out. Go and buy this book when it comes out! Thanks to Crown/ PRH for providing an ARC at the American Library Association conference.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Ireadkidsbooks

    Full of messages ranging from comforting to inspirational, with carefully paired artwork for each entry. The range of written work means there's something in here for everyone, and the single-spread format makes the collection approachable for upper-elementary students while not off-putting for high-schoolers. The line-up of creators is a who's-who of contemporary diverse creativity for children. A lot of modern resistance 'manuals' are hitting the shelves; this one will truly resonate with reade Full of messages ranging from comforting to inspirational, with carefully paired artwork for each entry. The range of written work means there's something in here for everyone, and the single-spread format makes the collection approachable for upper-elementary students while not off-putting for high-schoolers. The line-up of creators is a who's-who of contemporary diverse creativity for children. A lot of modern resistance 'manuals' are hitting the shelves; this one will truly resonate with readers.

  16. 4 out of 5

    McKenna Paul

    Published September 4th 2018 by Crown Books for Young Readers Biographies, Multicultural literature, Poetry Diversity lesson. Important activists, artists, and other voices bring their experiences, thoughts, art, ideas, and opinions on today's issues and creating a just society. SO many important lessons in this story. This read-aloud would practice mindfulness for my small beings of society.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Brian

    This book was written in response to the question of African American parents who were struggling with what to tell their kids in light of some of the racism making its way more readily into American political rhetoric. It is short stories, poems, and art designed to restore hope to children who might be frightened. A beautiful keepsake.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Earl

    An inspiring anthology for upper elementary and middle school grades that tackles current issues that have happened in the past. It's a good reminder that things can be overcome but it takes time and teamwork.

  19. 4 out of 5

    JoEllen

    The Words & Images of Hope is a must-have, must-share powerful collection. Incredible #heartprintbook with essays, advice and inspiration from incredible voices. Need to get the audio version too! Advice from Olugbemisola Rhuday Perkovich should be made into posters for every classroom wall.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Amanda

    This is very uplifting, inspirational, and authentic. I love the diversity and the thread interwoven among all of pieces: acceptance and love. Be kind, be you, and love others.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer

    Would be such a great book for the classroom.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Kim

    Teachers, pick this up for your classroom.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Alvera

    pg. 1 From the foreword, "I'm sure just to touch this book.... will lift your spirits..... Stand up , reader, and cheer for the good fortune that offers you this book to live by." What a beautiful, powerful idea and collaboration between many prominent names in children's literature and illustration who happen to also be people of color! A must for school libraries and a treasure that would be an asset in any home or classroom library. A valuable resource to encourage positivity and perspective t pg. 1 From the foreword, "I'm sure just to touch this book.... will lift your spirits..... Stand up , reader, and cheer for the good fortune that offers you this book to live by." What a beautiful, powerful idea and collaboration between many prominent names in children's literature and illustration who happen to also be people of color! A must for school libraries and a treasure that would be an asset in any home or classroom library. A valuable resource to encourage positivity and perspective that promotes diversity and acknowledges struggles. I love the biographies of the contributors, recognized some favorites and plan to comb back through for additions to my endless TBR list. A few of my favorites: "A Thousand Winters" by Kwame Alexander illustration by Ekua Holmes pg. 9 "Kindness is a Choice" by Jacqueline Woodson pg. 18 "It Helps to Look at Old Front Page Headlines" by Marilyn Nelson pg. 38 "A Day of Small Things" by Tonya Bolden illustration by Vanessa Brantley-Newton pg. 47 "here is a poem of love and hope:" by Arnold Adoff pg. 50 "Where Are the Good People?" by Tameka Fryer Brown

  24. 4 out of 5

    Lisa Bonack

    Written and illustrated by 50 famous people of color, this collection of poetry and prose is amazing. It's uplifting and inspiring. I will refer to it often. It ends with a detailed bio of each author/illustrator who participated in the creation of this book.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Elizabeth

    This collection is definitely a must-read for so many different reasons. Are you a kid feeling confused about the state of the world? Are you struggling to figure out how to impact the world? Are you a parent/educator/person who works with children in general and in need of some sage words to pass on to those children? Answering yes to literally any one of these things means you should definitely read this. Essays, letters, poetry, art, and photography have combined forces here to create a compl This collection is definitely a must-read for so many different reasons. Are you a kid feeling confused about the state of the world? Are you struggling to figure out how to impact the world? Are you a parent/educator/person who works with children in general and in need of some sage words to pass on to those children? Answering yes to literally any one of these things means you should definitely read this. Essays, letters, poetry, art, and photography have combined forces here to create a complete work that makes for vital reading for middle graders, and honestly, just about anyone in need of a kind word in today's climate. Highly recommended.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Dan

    This beautiful collection was super compelling.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Ms. B

    A book to give hope to those who feel we are living in troubled times. Give this one to anyone who believes in basic human rights for all and/or is interested in social justice issues.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Jordyn Tibbe

    Genre: Poetry Grades: Upper Elementary into Middle School Unique Feature: This book is perfect for working on rights of every different kind of person. Gives you a deeper perspective on freedom.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Frances❈

    4.5!

  30. 4 out of 5

    Elizabeth

    Given the Introduction to this book, in which the editors talk about living through the 1950s and 60s as Black people in the USA, and about their 7-year-old great-niece's reaction to the 2016 election, I was excited about this book -- but the "perspectives, words and images of encouragement, and hope and love" (p.3) felt generally banal to me. The Introduction asserts: "Within this collection, there's a letter from a parent to her children on kindness; there's advice on how to become confident an Given the Introduction to this book, in which the editors talk about living through the 1950s and 60s as Black people in the USA, and about their 7-year-old great-niece's reaction to the 2016 election, I was excited about this book -- but the "perspectives, words and images of encouragement, and hope and love" (p.3) felt generally banal to me. The Introduction asserts: "Within this collection, there's a letter from a parent to her children on kindness; there's advice on how to become confident and mindful; there are words of wisdom about finding and keeping friends; there are reminders of how to use the Golden Rule, how to cope with bullying, and how to face internal uncertainty; and there's an essay on how young people can change the world." (p.3) While technically true, I found most of them vague and trite. (And I was real mad at part of "The Art of Mindfulness" -- the author says, "we need to understand our feelings because they help us figure out the world. However, not all feelings are real. For instance, we might feel scared of something that hasn't even happened or may never happen." YOUR FEAR IS STILL REAL EVEN IF IT'S IRRATIONAL OR MISGUIDED OR WHATEVER! The overall paragraph is about examining our feelings, especially before we act on them, which I think is good advice, but "not all feelings are real" is SUCH a bad articulation of what the author was trying to get at.) I did appreciate the diversity of contributors. I went through the About the Contributors in the back and counted 25 men and 27 women. No no-binary folks -- and none of the Abouts disclose LGBTQ identity, though the contributors include Jacqueline Woodson who's Out, and there might be other Out contributors I just don't know. The contributors are primarily Black folks, but the list includes at least 2 Native Americans (Roy Boney Jr. is Cherokee, Joseph Bruchac is Abenaki), and at least 3 Asian folks (and not just East Asian -- Hena Khan is Pakistani American, and Muslim to boot; Innosanto Nagara is Indonesian; Ellen Oh is Korean American), and at least 4 Latinx folks (Margarita Engle is Cuban American, Rafael López is Mexican American, Edel Rodriguez is Cuban American, Eric Velasquez grew up in Spanish Harlem). And some of the pieces were really good. Like Tony Medina's "One Day Papí Drove Me to School," told from the POV of a girl whose father gets picked up by ICE -- and the reactions of kids at school, both negative and positive. Kids in those piece have "Make America Great Again" hats! I really appreciate the specificity, grounding it in the reader's lived reality. And Roy Boney Jr.'s "Tell It in Your Own Way" has great illustrations, and educates readers about the fact that Cherokee are still alive today and live modern lives in in ways, and educates about some Cherokee history -- all in a page and a half, and without feeling didactic; in a lot of ways it's "just" about the author talking about being an artist, like anyone else would in a children's book. I loved Laura Freeman's illustration of Zetta Elliott's "You Too Can Fly." I also liked Innosanto Nagara's illustration of Tameka Fryer Brown's "Where Are the Good People?" except that it requires outside knowledge to understand why people are pulling down a statue (the poem itself is about changemakers broadly). Props for having a wheelchair user among the folks pulling ropes!

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.