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Even Better Than Eden: Nine Ways the Bible's Story Changes Everything about Your Story

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Most people--Christians and non-Christians alike--are familiar with the garden of Eden, the perfect paradise that God created for the first man and woman. However, many don't realize the Bible teaches that God is preparing an even better world for his people in the future new creation. In this book, experienced Bible teacher Nancy Guthrie traces 9 themes--the tree of life, Most people--Christians and non-Christians alike--are familiar with the garden of Eden, the perfect paradise that God created for the first man and woman. However, many don't realize the Bible teaches that God is preparing an even better world for his people in the future new creation. In this book, experienced Bible teacher Nancy Guthrie traces 9 themes--the tree of life, garden and wilderness, the image of God, clothing, Sabbath rest, marriage, the seed of the Serpent, the temple, and the city of Jerusalem--throughout the Bible, revealing how God's plan for the new heaven and the new earth is far better than anything we can possibly imagine. What's more, she shows how this better world is already having an impact in the world today. Combining theological depth with warmth and accessibility aimed at addressing today's needs, this book will help individuals or small groups understand the story of God's plan for the future of his people.


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Most people--Christians and non-Christians alike--are familiar with the garden of Eden, the perfect paradise that God created for the first man and woman. However, many don't realize the Bible teaches that God is preparing an even better world for his people in the future new creation. In this book, experienced Bible teacher Nancy Guthrie traces 9 themes--the tree of life, Most people--Christians and non-Christians alike--are familiar with the garden of Eden, the perfect paradise that God created for the first man and woman. However, many don't realize the Bible teaches that God is preparing an even better world for his people in the future new creation. In this book, experienced Bible teacher Nancy Guthrie traces 9 themes--the tree of life, garden and wilderness, the image of God, clothing, Sabbath rest, marriage, the seed of the Serpent, the temple, and the city of Jerusalem--throughout the Bible, revealing how God's plan for the new heaven and the new earth is far better than anything we can possibly imagine. What's more, she shows how this better world is already having an impact in the world today. Combining theological depth with warmth and accessibility aimed at addressing today's needs, this book will help individuals or small groups understand the story of God's plan for the future of his people.

30 review for Even Better Than Eden: Nine Ways the Bible's Story Changes Everything about Your Story

  1. 5 out of 5

    Laura

    Full length review can be found at Servants of Grace. Nancy Guthrie’s Even Better Than Eden will illuminate exciting biblical patterns you may not have noticed in your reading of Scripture.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Michele Morin

    We are a story-telling family, composing on-the-spot homespun tales, filling up the long minutes of road trips with audio books, laughing together over replays from crazy conversations, and delighting in glory-moments together after the fact. As our family continually rotates in wider orbits, stories have become the fibers that connect us, that keep us known to one other. I’m grateful that all our story threads are woven into the fabric of the huge over-arching narrative found in the pages of Scr We are a story-telling family, composing on-the-spot homespun tales, filling up the long minutes of road trips with audio books, laughing together over replays from crazy conversations, and delighting in glory-moments together after the fact. As our family continually rotates in wider orbits, stories have become the fibers that connect us, that keep us known to one other. I’m grateful that all our story threads are woven into the fabric of the huge over-arching narrative found in the pages of Scripture. This once-upon-a-time-that-really-happened got its start in the mind of God, but the plot first hunkered down in the idyllic setting of Eden. Nancy Guthrie picked up her pen, gathered up the tangled threads of that story set in a garden, and she moves forward in hope through the unfolding of God’s redemptive plan in her latest book, Even Better than Eden: Nine Ways the Bible’s Story Changes Everything about Your Story On her meandering way from the thunderous God-force of creation to the end of the ages, she shares stunning truth about “what the original garden has to show us about the more secure, more satisfying, and more glorious garden we’re destined to live in forever, which will be even better than Eden.” (14) It’s easy to forget that Eden was born out of an uninhabitable wasteland on a planet that was “formless and empty.” Guthrie follows this story of wilderness through the Old Testament and the wanderings of the discontented Israelites, the ruins of Jerusalem after Nebuchadnezzar’s armies had had their way, and into the New Testament where Jesus passed His wilderness testing and Paul lived pinned down by a thorn in the flesh, but found contentment in his spiritual wilderness; Then, there’s the story of the tree, a symbol from Genesis to Revelation that pops up in the appearance of the lampstands in the Tabernacle and in prophetic symbolism. By grace, we are invited to find our way to the tree of life by way of Calvary’s tree; The story of God’s image is full of hope, for though it was marred, it was flawlessly revealed in Christ and will ultimately be restored in us; The story of clothing begins with God providing for Adam and Eve with love and tenderness that points to the truth that one day we will be beautifully clothed in “the greater glory Adam and Eve forfeited” (70); The story of the Bridegroom features Eve as the original bride in the very first wedding conducted by God which went terribly wrong. That pain resonated throughout Israel’s history, but the ruined bride will one day be restored and presented to God’s Son, the second Adam’ The story of sabbath began before there was Law and remains as God’s gift; The story of offspring unpacks Psalm 91 within the greater context of God’s sovereignty over evil and the “Offspring of the Woman” (Jesus) who will put an end to evil once and for all; The story of a dwelling place assures believers of God’s intention to make His home with us–an intention that cannot be thwarted even by our own fumbling and fluctuating intention to cling to Him. The tabernacle, the temple, and God’s indwelling Spirit all bear witness to His zeal and devotion; Finally, the story of the city reveals that all of Scripture points toward the story of two cities– “the city of man and the city of God. And what matters most about your story is which city you have made your home.” Nancy Guthrie renders biblical theology with beauty and a depth of emotion that motivates me to become a better learner, and a more passionate student of Scripture and observer of life. A firm grasp on the gospel-oriented-big-picture of the Bible’s 66 books will change the way you read. God takes a long view of goodness and hope, and his promises for our welfare point to a life that exponentially transcends the three-score-and-ten we fixate upon. A good foundation in biblical theology also impacts on the way we pray. For example, God’s promise of protection in Psalm 91 is not the lucky-rabbit’s foot that means our children will “never face danger or death in this life. But [rather that God] has promised to gather his own to himself, where he will protect them from ultimate and eternal harm.” Following the threads of these nine stories reinforced my understanding of God as both transcendent and relational. Finding myself within the context of His desires for me — a hope that far exceeds my own aspirations for myself and those I love — opens my eyes to the beauty of struggle and the redemptive nature of waiting as we fix our eyes upon the unseen, and trust God for a future home that will be truly (and amazingly!) even better than Eden. Many thanks to Crossway for providing a copy of this book to facilitate my review, which, of course, is offered freely and with honesty.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Amy Kannel

    I had the privilege of reading a pre-publication manuscript of this book, and I cannot say enough good things about it. Ever since I started reading it, I've raved about it to anyone who will listen! I believe this is an important and needed book for the church. So many people lack understanding of the big picture--they don't grasp that the Bible is one big story that fits together from Genesis to Revelation. And so many people focus all their attention on Jesus' life, death, and resurrection, w I had the privilege of reading a pre-publication manuscript of this book, and I cannot say enough good things about it. Ever since I started reading it, I've raved about it to anyone who will listen! I believe this is an important and needed book for the church. So many people lack understanding of the big picture--they don't grasp that the Bible is one big story that fits together from Genesis to Revelation. And so many people focus all their attention on Jesus' life, death, and resurrection, without giving much thought to His return or anticipating the ways that the New Earth will be far more glorious than what Adam and Eve lost. Guthrie skillfully brings attention and clarity to both. Each of the nine chapters explores how a theme unfolds from the Garden of Eden to the New Jerusalem. She weaves in personal illustrations and relevant application and leaves the reader in awe of what God has done and excited about what is to come.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Chris MacLeavy

    I have a particular love for Biblical Theology. So when I heard of a book that traces not one, but nine wonderful themes through the pages of Scripture, I couldn't get hold of it fast enough. I love the way that Guthrie traces from Eden to eternity so many wonderful, rich ways in which Scripture progressively reveals the ongoing activity of God the Redeemer through history. I also love how Guthrie demonstrates how these stories powerfully shape our own stories, simultaneously offering transforma I have a particular love for Biblical Theology. So when I heard of a book that traces not one, but nine wonderful themes through the pages of Scripture, I couldn't get hold of it fast enough. I love the way that Guthrie traces from Eden to eternity so many wonderful, rich ways in which Scripture progressively reveals the ongoing activity of God the Redeemer through history. I also love how Guthrie demonstrates how these stories powerfully shape our own stories, simultaneously offering transformation and hope to all of us who see life not going as planned. This is a tremendous, applicable, easy to read resource for every Christian.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Emily Schultz

    This book is a lovely narrative-theological work. It is meant to encourage the reader to continue to look to Christ and our future hope- enjoying Him forever. Full review here: https://coffeemeetsass.wordpress.com/...

  6. 5 out of 5

    Rachel

    I received a copy from the publisher in exchange for an honest review. This book is theologically solid and full of great quotes. Some chapters were really good, some were kind of meh. This book has discussion questions in the back, so I think I would have enjoyed it more as a group study instead of reading it by myself.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Becky

    Nancy Guthrie examines nine themes or nine stories of the Bible illustrating that what God has planned for us is even better than Eden. She writes, "Christ came to accomplish what was necessary to open the way for us, not just back into the garden of Eden, but into a home that will be even better than Eden and a life that will be even better than the life Adam and Eve enjoyed there." The nine stories are as follows: the story of the wilderness, the story of the tree, the story of his image, the s Nancy Guthrie examines nine themes or nine stories of the Bible illustrating that what God has planned for us is even better than Eden. She writes, "Christ came to accomplish what was necessary to open the way for us, not just back into the garden of Eden, but into a home that will be even better than Eden and a life that will be even better than the life Adam and Eve enjoyed there." The nine stories are as follows: the story of the wilderness, the story of the tree, the story of his image, the story of clothing, the story of the bridegroom, the story of sabbath, the story of the offspring, the story of a dwelling place, and the story of the city. Guthrie traces each story throughout Scripture often beginning in Genesis and concluding in Revelation. She never pushes too far trying to weave each and every book of the Bible into each story. Some stories might pull more from the history books of the Old Testament, others might pull more from the Old Testament prophets. But all nine stories include illustrations from the Old Testament and the New Testament. Most--if not all--have a beginning, middle, and end. The end being the future glory, the future fulfillment or consummation of God's promises. There is purpose, intentionality in the Bible and how it unfolds. It can--and should--shape us, shape how we see ourselves, shape how we see others, shape how we see the world, shape how we see God, shape how we live, think, act, speak. Guthrie wants you to be excited about being a citizen of heaven; she wants you to look forward to a new heaven and a new earth--to be eager for the kingdom of God. I love how each chapter relates to the here and now but also builds anticipation and longing for the future. To those perhaps unfamiliar with how the Bible unfolds it might create an interest--or might be used by the Spirit to spark an interest a curiosity to read and see for yourself, to delight in God's Word. To those familiar with the Bible it might be a good reminder of why the good news is the good news. Guthrie's book is a great read. From chapter one: "Have you ever thought about the emptiness you feel in this light? Do you think, perhaps, that God has let you hunger for whatever it is you are so hungry for so that you might become more desperate for him, more convinced that he is the source of what will fill you up? Do you think he might want to retrain your appetites, redirecting them away from this world, this life, even this age, so that your anticipation of the age to come might begin to shape your perspective on whatever it is you lack?" From chapter two: "The tree of life is not simply a thing of the past. It’s a promise for our future." From chapter three: "So how are we meant to see ourselves? And how can finding a solid source of identity keep us from floundering with a fragile or distorted sense of self?" From chapter four: "As we bring ourselves naked and exposed before the Word of God, this living and active Word goes to work in the interior of our lives, discerning our impure thoughts and ugly intentions of the heart so that we can confess, repent, and truly change (Heb. 4:12–13). The Spirit does his work of transformation so that we are increasingly wrapped in the robes of the righteousness of Christ—not simply in a judicial sense, but in the reality of our lives." From chapter five: "It makes sense that the Bible would begin with this poetic exclamation of love because the Bible is a love story from beginning to end. It’s the story of God choosing, gathering, and beautifying a bride for his Son. She’s not necessarily the prettiest or the most loving in return. In fact, as we read the story of the bride, we’re a little shocked at times that God would chose her. We see that she often has a hard heart; she’s often resistant to his affections and wholly dismissive of his gifts. Yet the Father is relentless in his pursuit and preparation of this bride for his Son. So far, it’s proving to be an unexpectedly long engagement. The Father has set a date for the wedding, and the invitations have been sent out. Of course, as much as we anticipate that day, the wedding will be only the beginning. It is the eternal marriage, the one in which we’ll never have to say “till death do us part,” that we anticipate most—a marriage that will be even better than the marriage Adam and Eve enjoyed in Eden." From chapter six: "This life was never meant to be an aimless existence; it has always been headed somewhere, somewhere better than Eden. The destination out in front of us should shape how we live day by day, week by week, and year by year. “Let us therefore strive to enter that rest.” How? By resting in Christ’s finished work and by spending a day, every week, anticipating the rest that is ahead for us because of it. The day is coming when we will rise from sleep to an eternal day of rest that will never end. Wouldn’t it be nice, in the restlessness of this world, to just spend a day, every week, in anticipation of that day?" From chapter seven: "Though God ordained a world in which evil and rebellion were possible, he didn’t create them. He is, however, clearly sovereign over them. Just as his word has the power to bless, so his word has the power to curse. He made clear that the days of this Evil One are numbered. One day a baby would be born, a descendant of the woman Satan had just deceived and so cruelly harmed. Her offspring would do the job Adam should have done. One day her offspring would crush the head of evil for good." From chapter eight: "Many of us would have to admit that our relationship with God is not nearly as passionate as we might wish, and our desire to be with him isn’t as strong as it ought to be. We sometimes find that we want to keep God at a safe distance." From chapter nine: "The story of the Bible is the story of two cities—the city of man and the city of God." "We’re called to live in the tension of being in the world but not of it. Do you feel that tension?"

  8. 4 out of 5

    MaryAnne Hommel

    There is a song with lyrics that speak of wanting to go back to Eden, back to the perfection that was God’s original creation. We are all so aware that this world isn’t what it could be, isn’t what it should be. But was Eden really all it was cracked up to be? In Even Better than Eden: Nine Ways the Bible’s Story Changes Everything about Your Story answers that question. Nancy Guthrie unpacks the intent of Eden, illuminating a perspective I had never considered. While teaching on Eden often focu There is a song with lyrics that speak of wanting to go back to Eden, back to the perfection that was God’s original creation. We are all so aware that this world isn’t what it could be, isn’t what it should be. But was Eden really all it was cracked up to be? In Even Better than Eden: Nine Ways the Bible’s Story Changes Everything about Your Story answers that question. Nancy Guthrie unpacks the intent of Eden, illuminating a perspective I had never considered. While teaching on Eden often focuses on the perfection of Eden, Guthrie focuses on the promises of Eden, promises to even its first residents. If you thought Eden was complete, get ready for an enlightening read that will change the way you view it forever. Guthrie is a legit Bible teacher. Her handling of the scripture is thoughtful, accurate and understandable. She asserts that God always had something better than Eden in mind, and we can experience some of what that is before heaven through the work of Christ. This material is never dry, especially once you catch the format she uses throughout the book. At the core of the book is The Story, God’s story of what He gave to and intended for man. Within that Story are stories of what happened up to and after sin entered the world. Each chapter of the book is its own story, and Guthrie does a masterful job of a topical survey of scripture for each subject. Starting with the Story of the Wilderness, we learn about the emptiness, “without form and void” introduced in Genesis 1. She connects this to the emptiness we have all experienced, then tells us the story of “without form and void” that is found throughout scripture, from Genesis to Revelation. She weaves the topic into a survey of the wilderness days of Israel, the discontentment through the Old Testament until we encounter contentment in the wilderness in Jesus Christ. Continuing the thread of the story she takes us through Paul’s battle with contentment and ends the story with John’s vision in Revelation of the time when “No longer will there be anything accursed.” Each chapter ends with a hymn that features the praise we can sing having seen the truth that is better than Eden. Each chapter follows this story telling format, and it is engaging. Weaving topics like the tree from the garden to the tree of the cross to the tree of life from the beginning to end of God’s word reveals a thread that connects not just the topic but connects us to the topic. We learn the past, we see how it connects to our present and look forward to the fulfillment in the future. The Story of Clothing (fascinating look at God’s covering), the Story of the Bridegroom, The Story of Sabbath, Offspring, Dwelling Place and the City all have a strong gospel message, with the work of Christ central to the application for us today. If you’ve ever read scripture and wonder how it all fits together, reading Better Than Eden will be a great introduction to biblical survey that will help you see the totality of God’s story. Also included is a discussion guide, bibliography, general and scripture index. This is all great resources for further study. While Eden is a distant memory, and heaven sometimes seems so very far away, you will be encouraged to learn that even now, there is something Better Than Eden. Read Well Friends! Thank you to Crossway Books for providing threeladiesoflit.com with a complimentary copy for review.

  9. 5 out of 5

    David Couch

    What is your story? Where would you begin? Maybe it’d be where you grew, where you went to school. Nancy Guthrie in ‘Even Better Than Eden’ wants you to start further back. She wants you to think of your story as part of the grand story – the story that begins in Eden. Getting the church to understand the grand story of the Bible is something that Crossway have been trying to do now for a while. From books in the ‘shorter studies in Biblical Theology’, to ‘Echoes of Exodus’, and many others. I, f What is your story? Where would you begin? Maybe it’d be where you grew, where you went to school. Nancy Guthrie in ‘Even Better Than Eden’ wants you to start further back. She wants you to think of your story as part of the grand story – the story that begins in Eden. Getting the church to understand the grand story of the Bible is something that Crossway have been trying to do now for a while. From books in the ‘shorter studies in Biblical Theology’, to ‘Echoes of Exodus’, and many others. I, for one, am really glad of this emphasis, so when I saw this book up for review, I jumped at it. In this book Nancy traces 9 themes from Eden through the Bible story line. And these themes don’t leave you thinking ‘oh that was interesting’, but instead draw you into them – making you long for the ending that is better than Eden. Structure The nine themes that can be found in this book are: 1) Wilderness 2) The Tree 3) His Image 4) Clothing 5) The Bridegroom 6) Sabbath 7) Offspring 8) Dwelling Place 9) The City Each of these ‘stories’ begins in Eden, and progresses through to the new creation – the better than Eden. Along the way you’ll meet the different Bible characters, and see how the Bible really is one story. A hymn also ends each section, which I found adds more depth to the hymns which feel so familiar. Nancy comes across as someone who you’d love to tell you a bedtime story, and her writing style will introduce those who would usually not open a theological tome to enter the world of Biblical Theology. She relates the stories to her own life, and in turn is then able to apply the themes in a way that you would not necessarily guess at the outset. The book also offers discussion questions at the end, which would allow you to use the book in a reading group (Guthrie is also working on a video series to accompany the book). Summary Even though I don’t fully agree with Nancy on all the specific theological points (Nancy would hold to a Presbyterian view, unlike myself), she does a great job at tracing the stories throughout the Bible. Reading this book will greatly challenge and encourage you by the storyline of Scripture that shines through the pages. I am all behind getting Biblical Theology into the hands of the masses, and this book does that job well. We are about to begin a Bible Overview at our church in the next few months, and having a book like this in my library will help me to tie major themes together. Thanks to Crossway for providing me with a complimentary copy of this book through their Blog Review Program.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Camron Hyde

    People can have a tendency to see the Bible as a disjointed collection of books and stories. Even more so, people tend to separate the Old and New Testaments going so far as to say there is almost a different God between the two or that God really changed once Jesus showed up. That's why I think Nancy Guthrie's new book, Even Better Than Eden is a valuable resource that most Christians need to take the time to read. According to Guthrie: Every chapter will trace a theme that runs from Genesis to People can have a tendency to see the Bible as a disjointed collection of books and stories. Even more so, people tend to separate the Old and New Testaments going so far as to say there is almost a different God between the two or that God really changed once Jesus showed up. That's why I think Nancy Guthrie's new book, Even Better Than Eden is a valuable resource that most Christians need to take the time to read. According to Guthrie: Every chapter will trace a theme that runs from Genesis to Revelation and that reveals an aspect of the excellencies and superiorities of the new heaven and the new earth (which we could also call Eden 2.0, or the new Eden, or the new creation, or the city to come, or the New Jerusalem)— superior not only to life in this sin-affected world we live in now, but superior even to what Adam and Eve experienced in the original Eden. Having heard of Guthrie, but never having read her other books, I was eager to read this one and I was not disappointed. Guthrie masterfully takes us from Eden to new creation saturating us with the gospel chapter by chapter. When all hope seems lost for Adam and Eve in the garden, God does not give up on His creation and in fact, He is working His plans and purposes to redeem humanity for an eternity that is even better than Eden. Guthrie shows the continuity of Scripture by tracing a theme in each chapter showing how it was broken in Eden through sin, but how God through the Old Testament uses that theme to point to a redeemer and ultimately it is made full in Christ. Jesus is the true and better Adam who did what the first man failed to do. He is bringing God's creation under His rule and bringing God's people to God's promised place. Even Better Than Eden is a valuable resource that's been given to the Christian community. Guthrie writes in a way that is intelligent and easy to read. She is personal and theological. Most importantly, in every chapter she proclaims the excellencies of Christ. Guthrie says, "We're beginning to understand through this story of the Bible that our longing for home is a longing not for a place but for a person." Through her book, she helps all of us echo Revelation 22:20, "Amen! Come, Lord Jesus!"

  11. 4 out of 5

    Patti Whitson Stephenson

    Nancy Guthrie does a good job in her book of presenting nine reoccurring themes in Scripture and the impact each of these has on our own walk with God. Written in an easy to understand and readable style, it’s a great way for both new believers and those who have been believers for some time to study an overview of the story of the Bible. I enjoyed reading this book on my own, but I’d also enjoy doing this as a group Bible study, too. Although all the chapters were interesting, I think the one Nancy Guthrie does a good job in her book of presenting nine reoccurring themes in Scripture and the impact each of these has on our own walk with God. Written in an easy to understand and readable style, it’s a great way for both new believers and those who have been believers for some time to study an overview of the story of the Bible. I enjoyed reading this book on my own, but I’d also enjoy doing this as a group Bible study, too. Although all the chapters were interesting, I think the one that meant the most to me was “The Story of Offspring”. Mrs. Guthrie’s discussion in that chapter is of the battle between good and evil, as well as God’s ultimate protection of His children. She recounts her own struggle with Psalm 91 after the death of her daughter, and how she came to view God’s love and care even in times of deep sadness. As I go forward in my own personal Bible study, I’ll be referring to this book again as I study these themes further. I received a copy of this book from the publisher. All opinions are my own.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Becky

    In this book Nancy Guthrie discusses nine themes that are woven throughout scripture. For each theme she discusses how it was in the garden, how it was changed through sin, how it will be fulfilled in the new heavens and new earth, and how this should change our lives. These themes are: the Wilderness, the Tree, His Image, Clothing, the Bridegroom, the Sabbath, Offspring, Dwelling Place, and City. Nancy Guthrie has an excellent way of demonstrating redemptive history, our need for a Savior, and In this book Nancy Guthrie discusses nine themes that are woven throughout scripture. For each theme she discusses how it was in the garden, how it was changed through sin, how it will be fulfilled in the new heavens and new earth, and how this should change our lives. These themes are: the Wilderness, the Tree, His Image, Clothing, the Bridegroom, the Sabbath, Offspring, Dwelling Place, and City. Nancy Guthrie has an excellent way of demonstrating redemptive history, our need for a Savior, and how God will one day make this world "Even Better Than Eden." She sometimes has some weird illustrations, but otherwise it was good and worth reading.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Susan

    Often, readers will ask me how to get the most out of their Bible reading or help on understanding God’s Word. In this book, Even Better Than Eden by Nancy Guthrie, we see that the Bible is so much more than we ever imagined. In Even Better Than Eden, Ms. Guthrie shows you how the Bible is not just God’s story, but your story, as well. This book will help you understand God’s plan for the future of His people―life in a garden even better than Eden and how you can glimpse this beautiful future eve Often, readers will ask me how to get the most out of their Bible reading or help on understanding God’s Word. In this book, Even Better Than Eden by Nancy Guthrie, we see that the Bible is so much more than we ever imagined. In Even Better Than Eden, Ms. Guthrie shows you how the Bible is not just God’s story, but your story, as well. This book will help you understand God’s plan for the future of His people―life in a garden even better than Eden and how you can glimpse this beautiful future even now.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Heather Persing

    **I received this book from Crossway through Netgalley. All opinions are my own.** In Even Better than Eden, Nancy Guthrie shares nine ways that the new heaven and new earth will be better than the garden of Eden. If this world has captured your attention and heaven doesn’t feel very appealing sometimes, this book will stir your heart for your future home.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Ronja

    Coming out at the end of August: Even Better than Eden by Nancy Guthrie. In Even Better than Eden, Nancy Guthrie traces nine themes throughout the Bible. These themes reveal how God’s plan for the new creation will be far more glorious than the original. This new creation glory isn’t reserved just for the future, however. The hope of God's plans changes so much our daily live, in the here and now as well. I think we are all familiar with the Garden of Eden. I think we are all even familiar with t Coming out at the end of August: Even Better than Eden by Nancy Guthrie. In Even Better than Eden, Nancy Guthrie traces nine themes throughout the Bible. These themes reveal how God’s plan for the new creation will be far more glorious than the original. This new creation glory isn’t reserved just for the future, however. The hope of God's plans changes so much our daily live, in the here and now as well. I think we are all familiar with the Garden of Eden. I think we are all even familiar with the events that happened in the Garden of Eden. We might not, however, think about all the implications that the actions set there. This are what the nine themes in the book discuss. As we reflect on these themes found in the story of Eden, we find how they still affect our lives today. And we find redemption even now. I found Nancy Guthrie was theologically solid. She reminds the reader of the wonderful promises of God throughout the Scriptures. The book starts in Genesis and ends in Revelations -- which is a wonderful way to cover God's promises to us. I loved how these chapters brought great insights for our lives right now. At the same time, Nancy Guthrie reminds the reader of the glorious hope of eternity and the beauty of it. I do think this book is better for those who are fairly new to the Bible and the Scriptures. Still to those who are familiar with the Bible, Even Better than Eden holds great reminders. Though not all chapters spoke to me, I gained good and inspirational insights from reading this.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Lori Jill

  17. 4 out of 5

    Susan Gilmore

  18. 5 out of 5

    Andraya

  19. 5 out of 5

    Addie Shrimpton

  20. 4 out of 5

    Lindsey Goetz

  21. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer Brogdon

  22. 5 out of 5

    Katherine

  23. 5 out of 5

    Leslie Christopher

  24. 5 out of 5

    Ben Smith

  25. 4 out of 5

    Lara

  26. 4 out of 5

    Tarrah Lancaster

    I didn’t finish this.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Jeanette Brower

  28. 4 out of 5

    Koleesa

  29. 5 out of 5

    Sarah Lorenz

  30. 5 out of 5

    Blythe

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