kode adsense disini
Hot Best Seller

Leadership: In Turbulent Times

Availability: Ready to download

In this culmination of five decades of acclaimed studies in presidential history, Pulitzer Prize-winning author Doris Kearns Goodwin offers an exploration of the early development, growth, and exercise of leadership. Are leaders born or made? Where does ambition come from? How does adversity affect the growth of leadership? Does the leader make the times or do the times mak In this culmination of five decades of acclaimed studies in presidential history, Pulitzer Prize-winning author Doris Kearns Goodwin offers an exploration of the early development, growth, and exercise of leadership. Are leaders born or made? Where does ambition come from? How does adversity affect the growth of leadership? Does the leader make the times or do the times make the leader? In Leadership, Goodwin draws upon the four presidents she has studied most closely—Abraham Lincoln, Theodore Roosevelt, Franklin D. Roosevelt, and Lyndon B. Johnson (in civil rights)—to show how they recognized leadership qualities within themselves and were recognized as leaders by others. By looking back to their first entries into public life, we encounter them at a time when their paths were filled with confusion, fear, and hope. Leadership tells the story of how they all collided with dramatic reversals that disrupted their lives and threatened to shatter forever their ambitions. Nonetheless, they all emerged fitted to confront the contours and dilemmas of their times. No common pattern describes the trajectory of leadership. Although set apart in background, abilities, and temperament, these men shared a fierce ambition and a deep-seated resilience that enabled them to surmount uncommon hardships. At their best, all four were guided by a sense of moral purpose. At moments of great challenge, they were able to summon their talents to enlarge the opportunities and lives of others.


Compare
kode adsense disini

In this culmination of five decades of acclaimed studies in presidential history, Pulitzer Prize-winning author Doris Kearns Goodwin offers an exploration of the early development, growth, and exercise of leadership. Are leaders born or made? Where does ambition come from? How does adversity affect the growth of leadership? Does the leader make the times or do the times mak In this culmination of five decades of acclaimed studies in presidential history, Pulitzer Prize-winning author Doris Kearns Goodwin offers an exploration of the early development, growth, and exercise of leadership. Are leaders born or made? Where does ambition come from? How does adversity affect the growth of leadership? Does the leader make the times or do the times make the leader? In Leadership, Goodwin draws upon the four presidents she has studied most closely—Abraham Lincoln, Theodore Roosevelt, Franklin D. Roosevelt, and Lyndon B. Johnson (in civil rights)—to show how they recognized leadership qualities within themselves and were recognized as leaders by others. By looking back to their first entries into public life, we encounter them at a time when their paths were filled with confusion, fear, and hope. Leadership tells the story of how they all collided with dramatic reversals that disrupted their lives and threatened to shatter forever their ambitions. Nonetheless, they all emerged fitted to confront the contours and dilemmas of their times. No common pattern describes the trajectory of leadership. Although set apart in background, abilities, and temperament, these men shared a fierce ambition and a deep-seated resilience that enabled them to surmount uncommon hardships. At their best, all four were guided by a sense of moral purpose. At moments of great challenge, they were able to summon their talents to enlarge the opportunities and lives of others.

30 review for Leadership: In Turbulent Times

  1. 4 out of 5

    Faith

    This book has mini biographies of four presidents selected by the author as exemplars of leadership abilities: Abraham Lincoln, Theodore Roosevelt, Franklin Roosevelt and Lyndon Johnson. There is a chapter for each, under each of three themes: ambition and early recognition of leadership ability; adversity and growth; and how they led during crises in their presidencies. There is also an epilogue that describes the ends of their lives. Aside from Lincoln, I hadn't really thought about that, and This book has mini biographies of four presidents selected by the author as exemplars of leadership abilities: Abraham Lincoln, Theodore Roosevelt, Franklin Roosevelt and Lyndon Johnson. There is a chapter for each, under each of three themes: ambition and early recognition of leadership ability; adversity and growth; and how they led during crises in their presidencies. There is also an epilogue that describes the ends of their lives. Aside from Lincoln, I hadn't really thought about that, and it was interesting to learn that each man died relatively young, Lincoln in his 50s and the others in their 60s. Of course I learned a lot more than that from this book, and one of the best things about it was that it made me want to learn even more about each of these men. I liked reading about the early experiences that shaped these men, but the most interesting chapters to me were the ones describing how each president faced a particular crisis during his presidency. Lincoln struggled with when to issue the Emancipation Proclamation. Theodore Roosevelt faced a coal strike threatening the country. In 100 days during the Great Depression, Franklin Roosevelt had to lead the country through bank failures and create the New Deal programs. Johnson had a brief window after Kennedy was assassinated in which he could convince Congress to enact the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Since the author was also Johnson's biographer, this chapter of the book felt fuller and more immediate. It included other Johnson accomplishments like the voting rights act, Medicare, tax cuts, federal aid to education, Head Start, the Fair Housing Act of 1968 and the expansion of immigration to admit people other than Europeans. She also described his great failure, the Vietnam War, during which he made terrible decisions and lied to the public. It was nice to read about presidents who actually believed that the government could and should help people and that leaders could and should bring people together.

  2. 5 out of 5

    TL

    I received this via Goodreads Giveaways in exchange for an honest review. All my opinions are my own. --- Short review since head is still on the mend (better than yesterday at least) The author is the history teacher I would have loved to have in high-school(aside from one in my school, the others weren't good at keeping me interested). She brings history alive and is good at keeping the reader engaged in the subjects she writes about. This one wasn't as good at Team of Rivals but was still an int I received this via Goodreads Giveaways in exchange for an honest review. All my opinions are my own. --- Short review since head is still on the mend (better than yesterday at least) The author is the history teacher I would have loved to have in high-school(aside from one in my school, the others weren't good at keeping me interested). She brings history alive and is good at keeping the reader engaged in the subjects she writes about. This one wasn't as good at Team of Rivals but was still an interesting read. It didn't feel as put together as it could have been though. If time travel were possible one day, I would love to go back and meet most of these men and just talk to them, observe them.. that would be amazing. More than once I found myself thinking "Were these men fated/born into their times because their souls would be needed and they were the only ones who could to what they did? Or did the times make them into the person the country needed? Or both?" Did that make sense? Haha, the author puts forth the same question better than me but it does make you wonder hmm? Looking at the title, I'm probably not the only guessing or wondering at the reason(s) she wrote it but one can only guess *shrugs* This one would be good as an introduction to new readers of her work. I only have one other of her books to judge by so far, so I can't say if longtime readers would enjoy this one or not.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Jean

    I thoroughly enjoyed this book and I also learned a few things about presidents, I have read many of their biographies. I am a big fan of Goodwin. She states she started working on this book in 2013 and it took her five years to research and write. I felt that the release of the book at this current time in our presidential affairs was quite pertinent. Goodwin wrote biographies over the years of each of the presidents. She chose for this book: Abraham Lincoln, Theodore Roosevelt, Franklin Delano I thoroughly enjoyed this book and I also learned a few things about presidents, I have read many of their biographies. I am a big fan of Goodwin. She states she started working on this book in 2013 and it took her five years to research and write. I felt that the release of the book at this current time in our presidential affairs was quite pertinent. Goodwin wrote biographies over the years of each of the presidents. She chose for this book: Abraham Lincoln, Theodore Roosevelt, Franklin Delano Roosevelt, and Lindon Baines Johnson. The book is divided into three thematic areas: ambition and recognition of leadership; adversity and growth; and how they led. In the final section Goodwin examines different types of leadership: transformational, crisis management, turnaround and visionary. The book is well written and researched. I found it interesting that each president struggled with his own variety of emotional problems. Goodwin reveals how each president had different leadership abilities. I found the three case studies in part three most interesting. Goodwin has presented two republican presidents and two democrat presidents. The book is unbiased. The book is well organized and easy to read. Goodwin is a master storyteller; that skill brings history to life. I highly recommend this book. I read this as an audiobook downloaded from Audible. The book is just over eighteen hours. The narration was excellent. Goodwin narrated the introduction and epilog. Beau Bridges, David Morse, Jay O. Sanders and Richard Thomas each narrated a president. It was great having different narrators as it allowed distinction between each president.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Lorna

    Leadership: In Turbulent Times is a powerful look at the qualities of leadership exhibited, each in their own way, and as determined by history and the unique crises and challenges faced by four transformational presidents - Abraham Lincoln, Theodore Roosevelt, Franklin Roosevelt and Lyndon Johnson. Beloved historian Doris Kearns Goodwin separates her book into three sections: Ambition and the Recognition of Leadership; Adversity and Growth; and The Leader and the Times: How They Led. Kearns Go Leadership: In Turbulent Times is a powerful look at the qualities of leadership exhibited, each in their own way, and as determined by history and the unique crises and challenges faced by four transformational presidents - Abraham Lincoln, Theodore Roosevelt, Franklin Roosevelt and Lyndon Johnson. Beloved historian Doris Kearns Goodwin separates her book into three sections: Ambition and the Recognition of Leadership; Adversity and Growth; and The Leader and the Times: How They Led. Kearns Goodwin explores the transformational leadership of Abraham Lincoln during the Civil War and the implementation of the Emancipation Proclamation; the crisis leadership of Theodore Roosevelt in the wake of the industrial revolution dealing with economic and social issues at the beginning of the twentieth century; the turnaround leadership of Franklin Roosevelt as he assumed office in the wake of the depression and collapse of the economy focusing on the corrective measures that were implemented in the first hundred days; and the visionary leadership of Lyndon Johnson as he came to the presidency following the assassination of John Kennedy and vowing to establish sweeping civil rights legislation as part of his Great Society. In these turbulent and unsettling times, it is comforting to know that this country has not only survived adversity in the past, but has found ways to improve this nation.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Bruce Katz

    3.75 (yes, I know it’s silly, but it feels right). Goodwin is to my mind a national treasure. Her earlier books hold pride of place on my shelves. This new book, however, simply didn’t move me as much. I’m not sure when she decided to write it — I understand that years of research typically go into her books — but one can’t read Leadership without being reminded again and again of the many shortcomings of our current political leaders. Indeed, it might be that the deeply worrisome nature of our 3.75 (yes, I know it’s silly, but it feels right). Goodwin is to my mind a national treasure. Her earlier books hold pride of place on my shelves. This new book, however, simply didn’t move me as much. I’m not sure when she decided to write it — I understand that years of research typically go into her books — but one can’t read Leadership without being reminded again and again of the many shortcomings of our current political leaders. Indeed, it might be that the deeply worrisome nature of our times led her to engage in a different kind of project than she otherwise would have undertaken. In this book she looks at the four presidents with whom she is most familiar — Lincoln, Teddy Roosevelt, FDR, and LBJ — in an effort to distill what leadership qualities enabled them to accomplish as much as they did in such difficult circumstances. I found her conclusions somewhat less than convincing, perhaps because the exercise by its very nature allows the researcher to choose whatever traits and circumstances he/she likes to highlight, excluding everything else. I found myself being reminded of the many ‘secrets of successful leaders’ books I edited when I was in publishing. That said, there is much of interest in Leadership. It’s worth reading because her subjects are worthy of study, most of the points she makes seem valid (if not replicable), and because just about anything such an astute and gifted a researcher as Goodwin writes deserves serious attention. I’ll be interested to learn what others think of the book.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Bryan Craig

    What makes a great leader? Are they born or bred? These are some of the questions Goodwin asks the reader. I really liked how Goodwin organized the material in her study of four great presidents: Lincoln, TR, FDR, and LBJ. She unpacks important traits of their childhood, how they recovered from their lowest points, and how they succeeded at their biggest moments as presidents. Other scholars remind us that presidential greatness is hard to find, and after reading this, this fact still holds true, What makes a great leader? Are they born or bred? These are some of the questions Goodwin asks the reader. I really liked how Goodwin organized the material in her study of four great presidents: Lincoln, TR, FDR, and LBJ. She unpacks important traits of their childhood, how they recovered from their lowest points, and how they succeeded at their biggest moments as presidents. Other scholars remind us that presidential greatness is hard to find, and after reading this, this fact still holds true, but Goodwin's easy writing style and important messages can inspire any one of us to be better at what we do. These four presidents all thought about something bigger for the country, held a strong vision of where they wanted to take the country, and asked the people to help. It seems many top-level politicians don't think in these terms, or if they do, they don't have humility or empathy. One critique is that Goodwin didn't examined the failed moments these presidents had in office with one exception: LBJ and Vietnam. I think we can learn about leadership from the failures as well as the successes.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Donna Wetzel

    Thank you Goodreads and Doris Kearns Goodwin for my free copy of Leadership: In Turbulent Times. This is an excellent book which I thoroughly enjoyed reading. Ms. Goodwin has the ability to take complicated subject matter and transform it into easy to read and understand text. She is a storyteller like Abe Lincoln and Lyndon Johnson, who are two of the past presidents discussed in this book. She gives many examples to support her viewpoints as to why these men had such great leadership qualities Thank you Goodreads and Doris Kearns Goodwin for my free copy of Leadership: In Turbulent Times. This is an excellent book which I thoroughly enjoyed reading. Ms. Goodwin has the ability to take complicated subject matter and transform it into easy to read and understand text. She is a storyteller like Abe Lincoln and Lyndon Johnson, who are two of the past presidents discussed in this book. She gives many examples to support her viewpoints as to why these men had such great leadership qualities. On a personal note, not one of the qualities that were mentioned in the book, appear to be qualities President Trump possesses, but that is my personal opinion. Our current President is not mentioned in the book, yet the sharp contrasts to the current administration cannot be ignored.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Jenna (Bookiemoji)

    Brilliant. I learned something about each president in their respective chapters. But became a bit muddled and long-winded when the author spoke by topic in the later half of the book and jumped between each president, sometimes mid-thought. Regardless, this is a very important book that I see doing well upon release. It’s a sad read, too, as it inadvertently highlights those things that are lacking in our current “leadership”.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Joseph Sciuto

    What a wonderful, wonderful book by the brilliant Doris Kearns Goodwin. Over the last couple of decades and especially now, I have asked myself, "Where have you gone George Washington, Abe Lincoln, T.R., Franklin Delano Roosevelt, and Harry Truman and in a sense "Leadership in Turbulent Times" by Mrs. Goodwin has answered that question. They having gone anywhere, but apparently the leadership in our country has refused to study and emulate these men; whereas the four Presidents in this book, Lin What a wonderful, wonderful book by the brilliant Doris Kearns Goodwin. Over the last couple of decades and especially now, I have asked myself, "Where have you gone George Washington, Abe Lincoln, T.R., Franklin Delano Roosevelt, and Harry Truman and in a sense "Leadership in Turbulent Times" by Mrs. Goodwin has answered that question. They having gone anywhere, but apparently the leadership in our country has refused to study and emulate these men; whereas the four Presidents in this book, Lincoln, T.R., Franklin Roosevelt and Johnson, understood the importance of history and the history of our country and what the Founders envisioned and most importantly what America stands for. All four Presidents had many things in common, but a few things that really stand out is that all of them put country above themselves and formed an intimacy with all the American people, despite class, race, or religion. When Franklin Roosevelt died a reporter noted, "One man has died and 130 million people feel alone." Before reading this book I had read a lot about Presidents Lincoln and T.R, some about President Franklin Roosevelt but virtually nothing about President Johnson. The Viet Nam War has so defined his Presidency that it is only after reading this book that I have come away with an appreciation for his legislative accomplishments, which until this day, have not been equaled by any U. S. Administration ... From Civil Rights and Health Care ... To Voting Rights and Equal Housing. The "Great Society" literally transformed the American Landscape. Despite whatever previous knowledge I had about the other 3 Presidents, I nevertheless learned a lot more about each, and especially how they approached the most pressing issues and tragedies of all time. "Whatever can be done today, cannot wait until tomorrow." I highly recommend this book. Thank you Mrs. Goodwin.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Kasa Cotugno

    Doris Kearns Goodwin breathes life into material that she's mined before. This audio version benefits from the contribution of four well known actors, each representing a president she had researched in depth (i.e., Beau Bridges reads the sections on LBJ). Since that research was so immersive, she came to think of Lincoln, T. Roosevelt, FD Roosevelt and LBJ as "her guys," and what each had in common was the power to lead the country in times of crisis. In her portraits, limning their paths to th Doris Kearns Goodwin breathes life into material that she's mined before. This audio version benefits from the contribution of four well known actors, each representing a president she had researched in depth (i.e., Beau Bridges reads the sections on LBJ). Since that research was so immersive, she came to think of Lincoln, T. Roosevelt, FD Roosevelt and LBJ as "her guys," and what each had in common was the power to lead the country in times of crisis. In her portraits, limning their paths to the White House, she points out the fact that they each possessed an extraordinary amount of empathy and lawfulness, two qualities she feels lacking in the current occupant.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Tony

    LEADERSHIP IN TURBULENT TIMES. (2018). Doris Kearns Goodwin. ***1/2. Ms. Kearns is a former winner of the Pulitzer Prize for her study of Franklin and Eleanor Roosevelt. She has taken the opportunity to select her four favorite presidents – the ones she has studied the most – and attempted to chart the characteristics they had in common that allowed them to reach the pinnacle of success within their careers. The four candidates for her further study included Abraham Lincoln, Theodore Roosevelt, LEADERSHIP IN TURBULENT TIMES. (2018). Doris Kearns Goodwin. ***1/2. Ms. Kearns is a former winner of the Pulitzer Prize for her study of Franklin and Eleanor Roosevelt. She has taken the opportunity to select her four favorite presidents – the ones she has studied the most – and attempted to chart the characteristics they had in common that allowed them to reach the pinnacle of success within their careers. The four candidates for her further study included Abraham Lincoln, Theodore Roosevelt, Franklin Roosevelt, and Lyndon Johnson. It was not a surprise to me that she found similar traits and behavior among all four that could be pointed to as being responsible for their success. Each of these men exhibited qualities of leadership that Mr. Goodwin ultimately broke down into four different categories: Transformational Leadership, Crisis Leadership, Turnaround Leadership, and Visionary Leadership. I didn’t find any surprises here, but her overarching conclusions about the set of four were what we would be forced to anticipate from our own former knowledge of history. Her conclusions about these four men entrench them as role models demonstrating leadership in their fields, and she makes the case for choosing them from the many potential candidates available for their special talents and achievements.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Dan Graser

    With characteristic erudition and thoroughness, Doris Kearns Goodwin achieves an answer to the main questions she was asking with this book: “Are leaders born or made? Where does ambition come from? How does adversity affect the growth of leadership? Does the leader make the times or do the times make the leader?” She centers this extensive answer around four different types of leaders who happen to share the distinction of having been elected President: the transformational leadership of Lincoln, With characteristic erudition and thoroughness, Doris Kearns Goodwin achieves an answer to the main questions she was asking with this book: “Are leaders born or made? Where does ambition come from? How does adversity affect the growth of leadership? Does the leader make the times or do the times make the leader?” She centers this extensive answer around four different types of leaders who happen to share the distinction of having been elected President: the transformational leadership of Lincoln, the crisis leadership of Teddy Roosevelt, the turnaround leadership of FDR, and the visionary leadership of Lyndon Johnson. This is no hagiography and is quite explicit on where it is that these figures fell short of the mark as pertains to effectively or wisely leading, however, the main focus is their unique attributes that were borne out in successful governing when they were tested to the extreme by various fractious elements of their respective political and sociocultural landscapes. Each is profiled through three major time periods common to them all: 1) Ambition and the recognition of leadership. 2) Adversity and growth. 3) The leader and the times: How they led. Godwin’s extensive expertise with these figures needs no explanation given the success of her previous works nor does the weight of historical rigor and perspicacity of observation she brings to bear. This is just great reading with a very important focus, on which Goodwin is relentless in her detail.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Pam

    I enjoyed listening to this book read by different excellent readers for each president. The author has such a vast knowledge about Lincoln, Johnson, and both Roosevelts which made this an insightful look into presidential leadership.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Bob

    Summary: A study of how four presidents led the nation during turbulent times, tracing their awakening leadership ambitions, the adversity that formed their character, and lessons from how they led. What distinguishes great leadership from the ordinary or the mediocre? Are leaders born or made? Are leaders great because of, or in spite of, their times? For answers to these and other questions about leadership, many have studied different U.S. Presidents, individuals with, arguably, the most chall Summary: A study of how four presidents led the nation during turbulent times, tracing their awakening leadership ambitions, the adversity that formed their character, and lessons from how they led. What distinguishes great leadership from the ordinary or the mediocre? Are leaders born or made? Are leaders great because of, or in spite of, their times? For answers to these and other questions about leadership, many have studied different U.S. Presidents, individuals with, arguably, the most challenging leadership job in the world. Historian Doris Kearns Goodwin has made a career of studying presidents, publishing four landmark biographies on Lyndon Johnson, Franklin Roosevelt, Abraham Lincoln and Theodore Roosevelt, (and his successor William Howard Taft). In this work, she returns to these four figures, and considers them side by side--four very different men, each who met great challenges and decisively led the nation through them. The book is organized into three parts. The first traces the awakening ambition of each man. Lincoln leaves an abusive father, educates himself, establishes a law practice and makes his first run for office. Teddy Roosevelt grows up mentored by a respected and wealthy father, overcomes physical weakness, marries Alice, who he met while in college, and goes to the New York legislature "rising like a rocket." Franklin Roosevelt, a distant relative of Theodore, enjoyed strong formative relationships with both parents, was sociable, learning more by listening than by reading, meeting the president as a young man, and charting a career trajectory that followed in Teddy's path. Lyndon Johnson was described as a "steam engine in pants," who learned early to find paths to power by getting near the powerful, beginning with work as an assistant to his college president. The second part looks at the role adversity played in the lives of each man and how it deepened and focused their ambitions. Lincoln, who went to the legislature with a program of infrastructure improvements, left office after a term, in shame, unable to fulfill his pledge to marry Mary Todd, because of the failure of the economy and the collapse of the programs he helped start. He was depressed to the point that friends considered the threat of suicide. He determined that "he must die or be better." Teddy Roosevelt lost his beloved wife and his mother within hours, and fled to a ranch in the west where work with tough and resilient men formed his health and healed his soul. He resolved to return, beginning a career as a progressive reformer that eventually took him to the presidency. Franklin Roosevelt was struck down in the prime of life with polio, and rebuilt his upper body strength, started a polio clinic at Sulphur Springs, and finally was convinced and convinced others that he could pursue the highest office. Lyndon Johnson, shortly after becoming Senate Majority Leader has a heart attack, a determines to return to the social programs, including civil rights, that had been at the heart of his early ambitions but had gotten lost in a quest for political power. The final part looks at how each led during the turbulent time in which they were president--Lincoln in the Civil War and making the Emancipation Proclamation, Teddy Roosevelt in using his office to resolve a protracted national coal strike, Franklin Roosevelt in turning around the country and giving it hope in the depths of the Depression, and Johnson, in succeeding to the office after the Kennedy assassination, and passing a sweeping program of social legislation from civil and voting rights to Medicare. In the third part, Goodwin draws lessons from the leadership of each president. Here, for example, are the lessons drawn from Lincoln's presidency: *Acknowledge when failed policies demand a change in direction. *Gather firsthand information, ask questions. *Find time and space in which to think. *Exhaust all possibility of compromise before imposing unilateral executive power. *Anticipate contending viewpoints. *Assume full responsibility for a pivotal decision. *Understand the emotional needs of each member of the team. *Refuse to let past resentments fester, transcend personal vendetta. *Set a standard of mutual respect and dignity; control anger. *Shield colleagues from blame. *Maintain perspective in the face of both accolades and abuse. *Find ways to cope with pressure, maintain balance, replenish energy. *Keep your word. *Know when to hold back, when to move forward. *Combine transactional and transformational leadership. *Be accessible, easy to approach. *Put ambition for the collective interest above self-interest. Each point is elaborated with specific examples. One gains both an appreciation of the personal greatness of each president, and the hard and soft skills of each president. Obviously, this is a great text for any who aspire to lead, if one has the drive, like Lincoln, to be better. It also sets a high bar in the qualities we look for in our presidents. She goes lightly on shortcomings, apart from a discussion of the failure of Johnson's handling of Vietnam. Having read three of the four presidential books by Doris Kearns Goodwin, I wondered if this would just be a re-hash of her prior works, re-treading old material. Certainly, she draws upon that and her narrative of working with Lyndon Johnson tracks closely with that in her Johnson book. What is fresh and distinct in this book is how she focuses in on leadership, as well as the setting of these four presidents side by side. Each of the succeeding presidents she studies was influenced by the former--Teddy Roosevelt by Abraham Lincoln, Franklin by Teddy, Johnson by Franklin Roosevelt. This book is a challenge, in what many of us would consider a turbulent time, to the kind of people we will be, and the kind of people we choose to serve in leading us.

  15. 5 out of 5

    George P.

    The best way to study leadership is to study leaders. How they exercised influence in their contexts provides examples of how we can do so in ours. For this reason, it is paramount for leaders to be well-versed in biography and history, the knowledge of people and their times. Doris Kearns Goodwin’s Leadership in Turbulent Times provides case studies of the leadership of four U.S. presidents at critical junctures in their administrations: 1. Abraham Lincoln exemplifies transformational leadership The best way to study leadership is to study leaders. How they exercised influence in their contexts provides examples of how we can do so in ours. For this reason, it is paramount for leaders to be well-versed in biography and history, the knowledge of people and their times. Doris Kearns Goodwin’s Leadership in Turbulent Times provides case studies of the leadership of four U.S. presidents at critical junctures in their administrations: 1. Abraham Lincoln exemplifies transformational leadership as he expanded the North’s war aims from union to emancipation through the issuance of the Emancipation Proclamation. 2. Theodore Roosevelt provides a model of crisis management by how he brought labor and management to the table during the Great Coal Strike of 1902. 3. Exuding optimism and executing a plan to respond to the Great Depression in his first 100 days, Franklin Delano Roosevelt offers a master class in turnaround leadership. 4. And Lyndon Johnson demonstrates visionary leadership by using all the forces at his disposal — including persuasion and hardball politics — to pass the Civil Rights Act (1964) and Voting Rights Act (1965), fundamentally altering the legal terms under which whites and blacks related to one another. Goodwin presents these case studies in Part III of her book, “The Leader and the Times: How They Led.” Of each president’s White House years, she writes: “There, at their formidable best, when guided by a sense of moral purpose, they were able to channel their ambitions and summon their talents to enlarge the opportunities and lives of others.” But those ambitions and talents didn’t emerge de novo or ex nihilo. The four presidents were influenced by circumstances just as much as they in turn influenced them. Part I, “Ambition and the Recognition of Leadership,” narrates the burgeoning sense of possibility each president experienced in his 20s especially, along with the recognition by their peers that they were destined for greater things. Part II, “Adversity and Growth,” shows how each one faced a test or series of tests that forced them to ask deeper questions of their life’s meaning — questions that, once answered, steeled their commitment to lead. Finally, an Epilogue examines how each man reflected on his enduring reputation, a fame that would last beyond both his administration and his death. How would they be remembered by posterity? As with Goodwin’s previous works on these four presidents, Leadership in Turbulent Times is a gripping read, combining biographical detail and historical context. It is the addition of shrewd insights about leadership throughout the book that marks a departure from her earlier biographies. Those insights are well-grounded and explicit. One of the great dangers of drawing lessons from biography or history is that such lessons smooth over differences, whether among the subjects of  biographical inquiry, or between their times and our own. Doris Kearns Goodwin is well aware of this danger and largely avoids it. The leadership principles she draws organically arise from the events she narrates. Here’s how she explains the matter in the book’s Foreword: "These four extended examples show how their leadership fit the historical moment as a key fits a lock. No key is exactly the same; each has a different line of ridges and notches along its blade. While there is neither a master key to leadership nor a common lock of historical circumstance, we can detect a certain family resemblance of leadership traits as we trace the alignment of leadership capacity within its historical context." That “family resemblance of leadership traits,” the book’s explicit lesson, is what leaders will most appreciate about Leadership in Turbulent Times. Its implicit lesson is that leaders must know themselves and their own times if they want to change them. Leadership never occurs in a vacuum where principles can be applied automatically. Rather, it requires wisdom. Like the biblical men of Issachar, leaders understand the times and know just what to do (1 Chronicles 12:32). Book Reviewed Doris Kearns Goodwin, Leadership in Turbulent Times (New York: Simon & Schuster, 2018). P.S. If this review helped you form an opinion of the book, please click “Helpful” on my Amazon review page. P.P.S. This review is cross-posted from InfluenceMagazine.com with permission.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Chris Witkowski

    This book reminds me of a doctoral thesis, with the subject being the analysis of the personal characteristics that make a good leader in trying times. She provides case studies of four presidents: Abraham Lincoln, Teddy Roosevelt, Franklin Roosevelt and Lyndon Johnson. She examines their early lives, pointing out crises they experienced, and posits that their ability to weather those circumstances led to the qualities needed later when, as president, and faced with immense challenges, they were This book reminds me of a doctoral thesis, with the subject being the analysis of the personal characteristics that make a good leader in trying times. She provides case studies of four presidents: Abraham Lincoln, Teddy Roosevelt, Franklin Roosevelt and Lyndon Johnson. She examines their early lives, pointing out crises they experienced, and posits that their ability to weather those circumstances led to the qualities needed later when, as president, and faced with immense challenges, they were able to provide the leadership the country desperately needed. The qualities that Goodwin lists are numerous, but one of the most crucial, in my opinion, is empathy. Being able to identify with the downtrodden, the enslaved, the poverty-stricken, the discriminated, enabled those four presidents to see that changes were needed. How each of them was then able to steer the country in the direction of change makes for fascinating reading. Lyndon Johnson's story, though, has a twist. While he was able to push through legislation, in a very short time, to push his Great Society agenda, ensuring voting rights, civil rights protections and tax reform, he is most remembered for the complete mishandling of the Vietnam War, an ironic and sad fact. One cannot read this book without reflecting on the leadership, or lack thereof, that our country is experiencing today. While these presidents were faced with a crisis and overcame it, it seems as though our president is the one creating crises. Where are the leaders of today?

  17. 5 out of 5

    Drtaxsacto

    I like Kearns Goodwin - anyone who can write convincingly on everything from baseball to superb biographies of leaders has to have something going. But this book is not close to one of her best. Its subjects should not have been a surprise - KG has written individual biographies of each of the subjects in her book (Lincoln, TR, FDR and LBJ). The book adds some new anecdotes for each of the leaders considered so there are some morsels. But I have two problems with the book - her underlying theory I like Kearns Goodwin - anyone who can write convincingly on everything from baseball to superb biographies of leaders has to have something going. But this book is not close to one of her best. Its subjects should not have been a surprise - KG has written individual biographies of each of the subjects in her book (Lincoln, TR, FDR and LBJ). The book adds some new anecdotes for each of the leaders considered so there are some morsels. But I have two problems with the book - her underlying theory that kinetic activity - even at the expense of the other branches of government - is what defines a good leader is wrong headed. I also think her choice of four leaders is unconvincing and pedestrian. Every president faces challenges. I am not a fan of three of the four presidents covered in this book. Clearly she believes in the centrality of the role of the president but it is in the spirit of James McGregor Burns. In my mind the best presidents had a superb ability to bring people together. Lincoln, either necessarily or because he could, operated under a good part of his presidency with martial law. TR was a classic self serving politician. He was in many ways manic (as Kearns' superb individual biography points out). It is certainly reasonable to argue that FDRs chaotic management style might have delayed the economic recovery from the Great Depression. And although she covers the tragedy of Vietnam (in the chapter on LBJ she makes the bizarre argument that JFK was more focused on international issues - wasn't he the President who said "Ask not what you can do for your country...." JFK was at best indifferent to working the Congress and thus his initiatives for domestic policy were left on the floor. The best part of the book is her descriptions of LBJs effort to get the Civil Rights Bill done. What concerns me about this book is that she could have chosen leaders who understood how to operate in turbulent times (both Reagan and Truman fit the bill or even perhaps Grover Cleveland) and had a much more defensible thesis and more entertaining book.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Maria

    Lincoln, Teddy Roosevelt, FDR and Lyndon Johnson all knew from a young age that they wanted to leave their mark on the world, they faced setbacks before becoming President that helped mold them into the leaders that they were. They all faced unique challenges, crises of the nation that they needed to address. Goodwin breaks their lives into segments for easier comparison, going stage by stage. Why I started this book: Goodwin has been repeatedly recommended to me but this is the first book of her Lincoln, Teddy Roosevelt, FDR and Lyndon Johnson all knew from a young age that they wanted to leave their mark on the world, they faced setbacks before becoming President that helped mold them into the leaders that they were. They all faced unique challenges, crises of the nation that they needed to address. Goodwin breaks their lives into segments for easier comparison, going stage by stage. Why I started this book: Goodwin has been repeatedly recommended to me but this is the first book of hers that I have read. Why I finished it: Fascinating to compare the presidencies, the strengths and weaknesses, the adversities and crisis that defined these men. Goodwin wrote about 4 presidents but as I read the unnamed 5th was our current president and he falls short of all these presidents.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Barbara Hoff

    Goodwin so clearly shows that though none of the four presidents she discusses were perfect, they all had leadership qualities that enabled them to be outstanding leaders in specific areas for which they will always be remembered. It really shows just how sadly we are currently lacking in real leadership. Lincoln, the two Roosevelts, and even LBJ really cared about our country and its people. They were always trying to do the right thing. They were all good people. Can the same be said about our Goodwin so clearly shows that though none of the four presidents she discusses were perfect, they all had leadership qualities that enabled them to be outstanding leaders in specific areas for which they will always be remembered. It really shows just how sadly we are currently lacking in real leadership. Lincoln, the two Roosevelts, and even LBJ really cared about our country and its people. They were always trying to do the right thing. They were all good people. Can the same be said about our current president? I think not.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Ctgt

    Kearns takes a look at four presidents- Lincoln, Theodore Roosevelt, Franklin Roosevelt and Lyndon Johnson and presents what she believes made them great leaders. The book is broken in to 3 parts; 1. The early years, 2. a pivotal professional moment and 3. a specific time when they each had to display leadership. Obviously there is a ton of information about all these men but Kearns does a good job of taking this info and shedding light on a particular aspect of their lives and legacy. 8/10

  21. 4 out of 5

    Linda

    Very east to read book highlighting moments in presidential history when selected presidents faced opposition or conflict. This book revolves around the presidents that Ms. Goodwin has already researched, Abraham Lincoln, Theodore Roosevelt, Franklin Roosevelt, and Lyndon Johnson. I highly recommend this book.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Russ

    Switching gears from mystery to history. Four presidents from the time they were young men before their political aspirations were full blown. Lincoln, arguably the greatest President of all. His compassion, even in the most difficult of times was an example to all. Teddy Roosevelt and his inexhaustible energy. He kept coming back to the political arena, hoping for one more chance to be the commander in chief. FDR, his indomitable spirit, who brought us through the Great Depression and WWII. De Switching gears from mystery to history. Four presidents from the time they were young men before their political aspirations were full blown. Lincoln, arguably the greatest President of all. His compassion, even in the most difficult of times was an example to all. Teddy Roosevelt and his inexhaustible energy. He kept coming back to the political arena, hoping for one more chance to be the commander in chief. FDR, his indomitable spirit, who brought us through the Great Depression and WWII. Despite a crippling illness, he proved to all what a great leader can do, even though confined to a wheelchair most of the time. LBJ, who should have been remembered for passing Civil Rights legislation, but instead will be remembered for his mishandling of the Vietnam conflict. Domestic policy was his strength and foreign policy his weakness and downfall.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Ngiste

    Top notch history, made even more interesting because of the comparative story telling and the leadership commentary. Highly recommend the audiobook as the readers are very good.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Randal White

    Another outstanding book from my favorite author!

  25. 4 out of 5

    Donald Powell

    I loved this book. I think it is maybe her best yet. She knew all four of these men (Lincoln, Theodore Roosevelt, F.D.R., and L.B.J.) so well they all came freshly, and meaningfully alive. "By, for and of the people" was a resounding theme in her comparison and dissection of who they were as persons and how they managed the crises confronting their times. The book was an excellent analysis of "Leadership", clearly revealing the concern for the average American and the principles of justice as gu I loved this book. I think it is maybe her best yet. She knew all four of these men (Lincoln, Theodore Roosevelt, F.D.R., and L.B.J.) so well they all came freshly, and meaningfully alive. "By, for and of the people" was a resounding theme in her comparison and dissection of who they were as persons and how they managed the crises confronting their times. The book was an excellent analysis of "Leadership", clearly revealing the concern for the average American and the principles of justice as guiding beacons. Any interest in American History or politics will be sweetly fed with this book.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Brian Willis

    Goodwin takes her 5 decades of research into the presidencies of Lincoln, Teddy Roosevelt, FDR, and LBJ and distills it into a tightly focused examination of the quality of leadership under challenging circumstances. The book is divided into three sections, where Goodwin gives each President a turn at biographical displays of leadership qualities. It also serves as a brief biography for each leader. Part 1 illuminates how each President developed professionally in their early years and how they c Goodwin takes her 5 decades of research into the presidencies of Lincoln, Teddy Roosevelt, FDR, and LBJ and distills it into a tightly focused examination of the quality of leadership under challenging circumstances. The book is divided into three sections, where Goodwin gives each President a turn at biographical displays of leadership qualities. It also serves as a brief biography for each leader. Part 1 illuminates how each President developed professionally in their early years and how they came to realize their call to political leadership. Part 2 relates the difficult and tragic circumstances each President faced as a setback to their personal and political ambitions (and yes, all four faced severe challenges). Part 3 specifically zeroes in on a particular political challenge as President where they displayed superior leadership qualities: Lincoln issuing the Emancipation Proclamation, TR resolving the coal strike of 1902, FDR's first 100 days, and LBJ passing the 1964 Civil Rights Act. In that third section, Goodwin divides the actions into sections highlighted by bold leadership maxims demonstrated by the actions of the four POTUS's. Each leader responds in a different way but each made the right moves to face the consequential moments of their time: the Civil War, the need for Progressive labor reform, the Great Depression, the culmination of the Civil Rights Movement. It's a great read for that purpose. It doesn't tread old ground in the sense that its focus on leadership qualities commands the four-part narrative. It shows that great leaders feel that call from an early age but also have to overcome great personal struggles in order to learn the necessary lessons to navigate the country through turbulent waters. And though it is not as lengthy as previous books by Goodwin, it is still as full of dense details and academic expertise. It also concludes with an epilogue looking at the political afterlives of these Presidents, all of whom were continuing to advance their leadership strategies until the day of their death (all four died suddenly, 2 in office). Another sterling work by Goodwin and a soothing balm for the rancor of our times.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Michelle Arredondo

    An interesting read. I have never been the History buff . Not my forte in school either. I wanted to read this book because American History..mainly of the Presidents...was one of the subjects my grandfather enjoyed reading. I wanted to give it a go. I did. I found this book to be quite interesting. It was not too much. It gave it's info and it gave it well. Writing style was to the point. When it got tedious (towards the end) I powered through and I am thankful that I did because I really enjoye An interesting read. I have never been the History buff . Not my forte in school either. I wanted to read this book because American History..mainly of the Presidents...was one of the subjects my grandfather enjoyed reading. I wanted to give it a go. I did. I found this book to be quite interesting. It was not too much. It gave it's info and it gave it well. Writing style was to the point. When it got tedious (towards the end) I powered through and I am thankful that I did because I really enjoyed this book. If you actually are a history buff I can see you truly enjoying this read. If you are not and want to explore uncharted territory....this book is it. Thanks to goodreads and to Author Doris Kearns Goodwin for my free copy of this book via giveaway. I received. I read. I reviewed with honesty and voluntarily.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Dustin

    Doris Kearns Goodwin is one of my favorite authors and her newest work, Leadership: In Turbulent Times, does not disappoint. As we live in a time of extreme divisiveness, currently void of presidential leadership, I found this extremely encouraging. Definitely a book that matches the needs of the times. Having written previously on presidents Lincoln, Teddy Roosevelt, FDR and LBJ, she weaves their stories together under the theme of leadership. There is a lot of back-and-forth, but it fits. If yo Doris Kearns Goodwin is one of my favorite authors and her newest work, Leadership: In Turbulent Times, does not disappoint. As we live in a time of extreme divisiveness, currently void of presidential leadership, I found this extremely encouraging. Definitely a book that matches the needs of the times. Having written previously on presidents Lincoln, Teddy Roosevelt, FDR and LBJ, she weaves their stories together under the theme of leadership. There is a lot of back-and-forth, but it fits. If you’re up for an audio experience, the narration (four distinct presidential voices) is fantastic. Highly recommend.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Porter Broyles

    When I look at books I consider three principal factors: 1. How well written is it? This book is very well written. Goodwin is a Pulitzer Prize winning author and deservedly so. All of her books are very well written. 2. How interesting is the subject? Lincoln, Teddy, FDR, and Johnson---four of the most important and interesting presidents in American History? Looking at each of those presidents during some of their turbulent years? The subject is very interesting. Johnson seems like an odd duck in When I look at books I consider three principal factors: 1. How well written is it? This book is very well written. Goodwin is a Pulitzer Prize winning author and deservedly so. All of her books are very well written. 2. How interesting is the subject? Lincoln, Teddy, FDR, and Johnson---four of the most important and interesting presidents in American History? Looking at each of those presidents during some of their turbulent years? The subject is very interesting. Johnson seems like an odd duck in this mix. The first three are routinely considered 3 of the top 5 presidents ever. Johnson is probably a top ten or fifteen president, but he is the one that Goodwin knew personally having worked with him in the White House and after his presidency. As a Civil War buff I'm very familiar with Lincoln and his story. I've read numerous books on Teddy and a few FDR. I wasn't very familiar with Johnson, which is probably why I enjoyed the sections dealing with him the most---everything was new. 3. Does the book offer novel insight into the subject or is it just regurgitating already known facts? The books is broken down into three key parts. The first third provides a short biography on each of the presidents. This section is pretty much a readers digest version of her other books. (Goodwin has written full length biographies on each of them). The second third deals with a personal crisis which helped to define each of the four presidents. For Lincoln it was political losses. Teddy lost his first wife and mother on the day his daughter was born. FDR loss the use of his legs. Johnson had a political defeat and then later a heart attack. How they responded helped to shape their character. These chapters were interesting, but again didn't really provide much new. The final third of the book looked at the leadership aspects of each president and how they handled major issues during their presidency (The Emancipation Proclamation, one of the Countries biggest labor strikes, the Great Depression, and Civil Rights). Here Goodwin highlights the principal of leadership used by the President and then discusses how the President acted to fulfill that aspect of the leadership. This was the section wherein I felt that Goodwin offered the most insight and was the most interesting. (NOTE: Somebody less familiar with the individuals probably enjoyed the first two sections more than I did.) While I enjoyed this book, it isn't quite up to par with her other words. Her books Bully Pulpit and Team of Rivals are easily five star books.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Richard

    Having read and enjoyed Kearns Goodwin's books on FDR, Lincoln, and LBJ I was curious to see how this book would be. This one did not disappoint in most respects. As with the other 3 books her narrative style of history telling in a relatively direct prose makes for engaging reading. Even when KG provides background and/or context she does it in manner that keeps the storyline moving along at a comfortable, and for the most part, interesting pace. In this book the author still demonstrates a fine Having read and enjoyed Kearns Goodwin's books on FDR, Lincoln, and LBJ I was curious to see how this book would be. This one did not disappoint in most respects. As with the other 3 books her narrative style of history telling in a relatively direct prose makes for engaging reading. Even when KG provides background and/or context she does it in manner that keeps the storyline moving along at a comfortable, and for the most part, interesting pace. In this book the author still demonstrates a finely tuned eye for how family history and dynamics as well as the social circumstances of the times in which these men grew up and came into adulthood molded their personalities, and, for the purposes of this book, their leadership styles. Her psychological analyses of these men, their relationships with others, their strivings for leadership, and their ability to overcome adversity are clearly articulated. She seems to know just how much of this to provide in a timely manner. I liken her style to the story of Goldlilocks: neither too much nor too little but just about right. To her credit, and as was the case with her book on LBJ, KG offers a brief analysis of how his leadership skills/personality which served him so well with civil rights, voting rights, and a host of other social legislation failed him when it came to the Vietnam debacle. She made some brief comments about how TR’s high energy levels and forceful personality put him in precarious positions with others early in his career. I wish she had done the same with Lincoln and FDR. Also, each was inspiringly successful in many respects but each one also encountered challenges which they failed to cope with. Rather than write in the last chapter about their passing away I wish she had provided an analysis of how their strengths in some respects were also their flaws in other circumstances. She also could have added some comments about the legacies which each man left. When I heard about this book, the cynic in me wondered if it was going to be a case of an aging popular historian mining her previous work with little new in it. There were clearly elements in this book which KG presented and discussed in the other 3 books of hers that I have read. But I had read those other books so many years ago that I did not mind the redundancy. Also, there was enough new information with the added perspective on leadership that led me to think that overall this is a worthwhile read. Maybe a 4.5, in fact. I have not read KG's memoir. Leadership and the good memories I have of her other books make me think that maybe I should.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.