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Justice League: No Justice

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The creative team of Scott Snyder, Joshua Williamson, James Tynion IV and Francis Manapul unleash new super-teams in Justice League: No Justice. The events of Dark Nights: Metal have transformed the universe in ways both wonderful and terrifying...and unleashed four ancient entities with the power to destroy it all. Mystery. Wonder. Wisdom. Entropy. These four forces govern The creative team of Scott Snyder, Joshua Williamson, James Tynion IV and Francis Manapul unleash new super-teams in Justice League: No Justice. The events of Dark Nights: Metal have transformed the universe in ways both wonderful and terrifying...and unleashed four ancient entities with the power to destroy it all. Mystery. Wonder. Wisdom. Entropy. These four forces govern all of existence, and now the godlike beings who embody them have awakened. All life is in jeopardy, and the only chance the superheroes of Earth have to stop the unthinkable lies in new alliances...the likes of which have never been seen before! Superman, Starfire and Martian Manhunter search for the secrets of the cosmos in Team Mystery! Batman, Beast Boy and Deathstroke battle chaos itself as Team Entropy! Wonder Woman, Zatanna and Etrigan the Demon unlock bizarre alien technologies with Team Wonder! And the Flash, Cyborg and Harley Quinn learn the astonishing truths of Team Wisdom! Can these amazing new Justice Leagues stick together to stop universal annihilation? Some heroes will not live long enough to find out... Collects issues #1-4 and stories from DC Nation #0.


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The creative team of Scott Snyder, Joshua Williamson, James Tynion IV and Francis Manapul unleash new super-teams in Justice League: No Justice. The events of Dark Nights: Metal have transformed the universe in ways both wonderful and terrifying...and unleashed four ancient entities with the power to destroy it all. Mystery. Wonder. Wisdom. Entropy. These four forces govern The creative team of Scott Snyder, Joshua Williamson, James Tynion IV and Francis Manapul unleash new super-teams in Justice League: No Justice. The events of Dark Nights: Metal have transformed the universe in ways both wonderful and terrifying...and unleashed four ancient entities with the power to destroy it all. Mystery. Wonder. Wisdom. Entropy. These four forces govern all of existence, and now the godlike beings who embody them have awakened. All life is in jeopardy, and the only chance the superheroes of Earth have to stop the unthinkable lies in new alliances...the likes of which have never been seen before! Superman, Starfire and Martian Manhunter search for the secrets of the cosmos in Team Mystery! Batman, Beast Boy and Deathstroke battle chaos itself as Team Entropy! Wonder Woman, Zatanna and Etrigan the Demon unlock bizarre alien technologies with Team Wonder! And the Flash, Cyborg and Harley Quinn learn the astonishing truths of Team Wisdom! Can these amazing new Justice Leagues stick together to stop universal annihilation? Some heroes will not live long enough to find out... Collects issues #1-4 and stories from DC Nation #0.

30 review for Justice League: No Justice

  1. 4 out of 5

    Sam Quixote

    For some reason mystery, wonder, wisdom, and entropy are manifested as titans who want to crush planets. Guess what the Justice League have to do? That’s right, say it with me: punch dem. Yaaaawn. Yep, it’s another impossibly bad Justice League book! If you thought Dark Nights: Metal was Scott Snyder’s lowest ebb, think again - the dude somehow found an even lower level of quality in No Justice! Snyder heads up a team of hacks who’ve come up with one of the blandest superhero stories ever, even For some reason mystery, wonder, wisdom, and entropy are manifested as titans who want to crush planets. Guess what the Justice League have to do? That’s right, say it with me: punch dem. Yaaaawn. Yep, it’s another impossibly bad Justice League book! If you thought Dark Nights: Metal was Scott Snyder’s lowest ebb, think again - the dude somehow found an even lower level of quality in No Justice! Snyder heads up a team of hacks who’ve come up with one of the blandest superhero stories ever, even by bland superhero stories standards. It amounts to emptying out a toybox of every DC character ever, arbitrarily sorting them into teams and throwing them at some disposable villains of the week. And it’s so tense that somehow the characters conveniently have the time to change into team-specific coloured uniforms before going off to hit their assigned baddie! It’s even more boring to read than you might expect from something so unimaginative and one-note. I don’t expect anyone besides the most rabid of DC fanboys enjoying this colostomy bag of a comic. It’s an obvious pun but it’s true: No Justice is no good.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Chad

    Braniac reconfigures Earth's mightiest teams into new configurations so they may work more efficiently with each other in the most contrived comic to come out this year. But when it's all said and done the teams are pretty much the same sans a couple of members on each. This book was filled with so much stupid exposition trying to justify these Omega Titans and the dumb world trees of wonder, mystery, exposition, and charity? (I've forgotten the fourth one at this point and can't be bothered to Braniac reconfigures Earth's mightiest teams into new configurations so they may work more efficiently with each other in the most contrived comic to come out this year. But when it's all said and done the teams are pretty much the same sans a couple of members on each. This book was filled with so much stupid exposition trying to justify these Omega Titans and the dumb world trees of wonder, mystery, exposition, and charity? (I've forgotten the fourth one at this point and can't be bothered to look it up again.) The only good thing about this, were some cool things to come out of it like the return of the Outsiders. It felt like the story was written after they decided what the outcome would be. Like DC told the authors, "Hey we want to twist the status quo at DC to this. Can you come up with a story to do that?" and this is the garbage that came out of that conversation. Francis Manapul and Marcus To do make the book look great. Unfortunately, they had Riley Rossmo fill in on issue 3 and wipe his stank on the project. Received a review copy from DC and NetGalley. All thoughts are my own and in no way influenced by the aforementioned.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Wing Kee

    Choppy, messy, bombastic mess of a book. World: The art is beautiful, there are ups and downs to it but when Manapul is the artist there is a sense of grandeur that few DC books have, this is where Manapul is at his best. The world building here is the best thing about this series. The building of the pieces from the past and the changing of the status quo for the future is the best part. The heroes and villains we see together, the calls to the cosmic, the source wall, the Outsiders and new thin Choppy, messy, bombastic mess of a book. World: The art is beautiful, there are ups and downs to it but when Manapul is the artist there is a sense of grandeur that few DC books have, this is where Manapul is at his best. The world building here is the best thing about this series. The building of the pieces from the past and the changing of the status quo for the future is the best part. The heroes and villains we see together, the calls to the cosmic, the source wall, the Outsiders and new things altogether, this world is great. The idea of the Omega Titans was a bit wishy washy and the large cast didn’t’ allow for them to be developed but overall the world is so much more interesting now for the DCU. Story: A choppy, messy and convoluted story that ends in a great place for the DCU. The idea of the 4 teams was great, the end was great, everything in between was honestly draggy and the cast too big for the four issue run. I liked the idea of the teams and the dynamics, chemistry and banter it would allow but just like any Justice League book there are far too many action sequences and far too little time for characters to interact. There are so many big things happening at the same time and the logic and the world building can’t keep up with the action that the story just gets jumbled into a mess. There are huge ideas that Snyder is trying to do and new status quos he’s trying to set and once again with the 4 issues it was janky as all hell. I did liked how the book ended with the promise of New Justice and the multiple teams but the villain did not pan out and the story was just a mess. I will say that the tie in with Green Arrow was also rather ho hum and zzz… Characters: There are so many characters that I won’t get into each and every one of them. As with all event book there are those that are just panel candy and Deathstroke and Harley are absolutely that, so are a lot of them in fact. The cast was huge but not in a good way. That’s what happens in event and team books, but oh well. There was some character moments but most of them were unearned and a lot of them just happened for the sake of the story. J’onn being leader makes sense to DC fans but not to new readers. I liked it but I also felt this was much like many events bloated and tried to do too much with too many characters and too few issues. The status quo change is good but how we reached it left a lot to be desired. Onward to the next book! *read individual issues*

  4. 5 out of 5

    James DeSantis

    No Justice is...well no fun. I want to love this. A HUGE cast of characters are all brought in by Brainiac as he tells him trouble is coming. Something bigger than they ever faced. So he splits them into teams that he believes will work best together to take these god like destroyers down. From there we have a bunch of groups of Justice League working together to stop the destroyers. So...basically Metal 2.0. Good: I enjoy the art a lot for the most part. Some great shots and cool fighting momen No Justice is...well no fun. I want to love this. A HUGE cast of characters are all brought in by Brainiac as he tells him trouble is coming. Something bigger than they ever faced. So he splits them into teams that he believes will work best together to take these god like destroyers down. From there we have a bunch of groups of Justice League working together to stop the destroyers. So...basically Metal 2.0. Good: I enjoy the art a lot for the most part. Some great shots and cool fighting moments. I also thought Damien was pretty great here. Bad: It felt really convoluted, heavy exposition once again, and just a messy event like comic. Sure, way shorter and more condensed then Metal but just as confusing at times. The ending didn't get me very excited. So yeah, another small event that didn't work for me. Just like Metal this one didn't do much for me. A 2 out of 5.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Jedi JC Daquis

    The best trait of No Justice is that Snyder has told the story in a modular fashion, an effective way to avoid a possible convoluted mess of plot, exposition and the sheer volume of characters while still maintaining its focus on what has to be done, even though there are still many parts of the story that I believe may still be improved. The art on the other hand is great. Whatever Manapul draws, I admire. This is definitely not one of the better stories of Scott Snyder. Perhaps DC Comics is squ The best trait of No Justice is that Snyder has told the story in a modular fashion, an effective way to avoid a possible convoluted mess of plot, exposition and the sheer volume of characters while still maintaining its focus on what has to be done, even though there are still many parts of the story that I believe may still be improved. The art on the other hand is great. Whatever Manapul draws, I admire. This is definitely not one of the better stories of Scott Snyder. Perhaps DC Comics is squeezing him way more than he could handle. No Justice severely impeded what the Omega Titans could have possibly done, their power, making these primordial beings conveniently dumb to fit in the story.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Shadowdenizen

    A very underwhelming follow-up to a very mediocre event ("Metal"). This was a hot dumpster fire from start to finish. How is it that an epic concept like this gets FOUR ISSUES, while other, lesser premises get 6, 8 or even 12 issues?) This felt like a rush job: there wasn't enough time to flesh out the plot, or the teams involved, and felt rushed from the opening page.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Roy

    So overly convoluted. Way too much going on and too dialogue heavy. I haven't really liked this new direction DC has taken with the Metals with Snyder. Dissapointed so far

  8. 5 out of 5

    GrilledCheeseSamurai

    Fast Paced...no filler...just balls to the wall. A perfect, cosmic, bridge-mini-series from Metal into the new Justice League titles.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Lashaan Balasingam (Bookidote)

    You can find my review on my blog by clicking here. Following the aftermath of DC’s cosmic event Dark Nights: Metal, Scott Snyder moves on to taking over the Justice League series by first introducing readers to a new cosmic threat in Justice League: No Justice. Having easily distinguished himself among the many writers at DC Comics and proving his incredible creativity and masterful story-telling talents throughout his New 52 Batman series, his plans on pushing the universe a step further into t You can find my review on my blog by clicking here. Following the aftermath of DC’s cosmic event Dark Nights: Metal, Scott Snyder moves on to taking over the Justice League series by first introducing readers to a new cosmic threat in Justice League: No Justice. Having easily distinguished himself among the many writers at DC Comics and proving his incredible creativity and masterful story-telling talents throughout his New 52 Batman series, his plans on pushing the universe a step further into the darkness continues by taking on one of the most important teams in superhero history. With Justice League: No Justice, Scott Snyder teams up with a phenomenal creative team consisted of Joshua Williamson, James Tynion IV and Francis Manapul to offer fans a bridge towards bigger threats, and forces that have never been introduced before. Collecting issues #1-4, as well as a preview teaser from DC Nation #0, this story arc assures fans that it plans on destroying the status quo. Picking up where things were left off during the grandiose and insane Metal event, heroes find out that the consequences of their actions had repercussions, but this time around the effects go beyond Earth and as deep into the universe as possible. The arrival of four ancient entities whose hunger extends beyond humans and creatures, but rather planets, clearly sets the table at the scope of this new danger that Earth’s heroes are now going to have to face. But to overcome this new challenge, new alliances need to be forged and these alliances do not limit our heroes to those who only sought good in the world. In fact, among these villains who lend a helping hand, one of them has a plan, and it is not going to be an easy one to follow. As short as this story arc might be, it was extremely concise, yet incredibly explosive. There was a desire to introduce a whole new element to the DC lore while leaving enough mysteries for fans to ruminate on. After all, the intention was to shake things up for the Justice League and have a whole new foundation on which Scott Snyder can work on during his Justice League run. By introducing these new godlike beings into this universe, he gives himself this window of opportunity during which he can introduce and reintroduce all kinds of characters, and give them a voice behind which they can firmly build their own stories in the future. The underlying structure to the story is pretty simple and easy to follow making it a bit less exciting, but when you understand the intention behind the story, you find yourself wondering what kind of doors Scott Snyder plans on opening next, and that’s absolutely thrilling. The first two issues’ artwork are truly sensational thanks to Francis Manapul’s style. Known especially for this work on the New 52 The Flash series, I have rarely ever found his work to be difficult to appreciate, especially when he finds really interesting approaches to structure the way you read the story. Instead of standard square panels read from left to red, row after row, he finds creative ways to integrate a general theme to a two-page full page panel and makes you explore and appreciate the story differently. It does merit mentioning that some of his designs for female heroes, like Wonder Woman and her visage, looked odd, but nothing detrimental. Nothing as detrimental as the artwork we’re thrown into in the third issue where Riley Rossmo takes over at least. In all honesty, I could never stand his artwork style, and it was no exception here. It sometimes could get as bad as some of Frank Miller’s late-career stuff. Yes. That bad. At least the final issue in this volume, the very story from DC Nation #0 was eye-candy. Jorge Jimenez is a man who knows how to draw and there’s simply no way you could skim through his stuff. The details are exquisite! Justice League: No Justice is a wonderful story arc that serves as a transition to Scott Snyder’s Justice League run, and an excellent teaser to what’s to come. If you thought the multiverse was complicated, expect things to get even bigger. Yours truly, Lashaan | Blogger and Book Reviewer Official blog: https://bookidote.com/

  10. 5 out of 5

    Donovan

    Much like the DMV, it’s bright, boring, and I wasted way too much time. The mythology is interesting but the pacing is glue. And jesus, how many times will there be an apocalypse and a destroyer?

  11. 4 out of 5

    Shannon Appelcline

    This story had great potential. The destruction of the source wall brings new cosmic entities that threaten the universe. Cool? But instead it's a great disappointment. Unfortunately the cosmic entities are both unoriginal and underdeveloped. They might as well be Celestials and the fact that they're linked to cosmic ideals like Wonder and Mystery and Entropy is entirely ignored. And the plot is just a big railroad: Brainiac gathers together a bunch of heroes, separates them into color-coded teams This story had great potential. The destruction of the source wall brings new cosmic entities that threaten the universe. Cool? But instead it's a great disappointment. Unfortunately the cosmic entities are both unoriginal and underdeveloped. They might as well be Celestials and the fact that they're linked to cosmic ideals like Wonder and Mystery and Entropy is entirely ignored. And the plot is just a big railroad: Brainiac gathers together a bunch of heroes, separates them into color-coded teams that never matter and then promptly dies for no reason. The long fight that follows is almost entirely uninteresting and does nothing of note with its flat, uncharacterized 20+ heroes. Then, at the end it's again used for an artificial plot point: to create a totally different division of heroes to populate the three upcoming Justice League series (which will hopefully be better than the mediocre-to-poor Rebirth era series, or this mini-series for that matter). Oh, and let's not even speak of the character assassination of Vril Dox. Stupid DC. (And it appears that they've totally rebooted LEGION history, based on its lack of reference except an icon in this comic; apparently even in the Rebirth era, DC is still intent on destroying its history.)

  12. 5 out of 5

    Malum

    Wow, this was pretty bad. So Galactus-oops, I mean "a titan"-is going to eat a planet and only a random mashup of heroes and villains can stop it...by going on a D&D-type quest to find some magic trees I guess? So, yeah, the plot was hot garbage, there was waaaaaaaaaaaaay too much dialog (Snyder seems to be getting worse and worse about this), there were too many characters (Thus no one got to shine or stand out), and the art was terrible (everyone had really square heads and Wonder Woman lo Wow, this was pretty bad. So Galactus-oops, I mean "a titan"-is going to eat a planet and only a random mashup of heroes and villains can stop it...by going on a D&D-type quest to find some magic trees I guess? So, yeah, the plot was hot garbage, there was waaaaaaaaaaaaay too much dialog (Snyder seems to be getting worse and worse about this), there were too many characters (Thus no one got to shine or stand out), and the art was terrible (everyone had really square heads and Wonder Woman looked like a man). By issue 2 I was just about done with this and by issue 4 I was wishing I hadn't picked it up at all.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Anthony

    Pretty fun bridge between Metal and Snyders Justice League series. Bit over convoluted at times given the amount of characters and the fact that Snyder loves his text in comics. But the Manapul art is amazing.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Pablo

    Realmente sólo he leído las dos primeras entregas, pero no voy a seguir y eso penaliza mucho. El primer episodio no está mal: dibujo estupendo y mucho colorín, algún giro intrigante, sale mi adorada Amanda Waller (y obesa y cuarentona, no la modelo del New 52)...Pero llega el capítulo 2...Todo conceptos muy vagos, más grandes que la vida y narrados de forma confusa; pero para darse de tortas a los supers ya les va bien.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Diane Hernandez

    Justice League: No Justice shows the impact of the dark multiverse is continuing. After the wall was opened up between the multiverse and the dark multiverse in Dark Nights: Metal, a new evil is unleashed upon the galaxy. The four Omega Titans each represent one of the fundamental energies of sentient life: entropy, wisdom, wonder and mystery. When Wisdom attacks Brainiac’s home planet, Brainiac brings together all the galaxy’s heroes, villains and monsters to fight together using his sophisticat Justice League: No Justice shows the impact of the dark multiverse is continuing. After the wall was opened up between the multiverse and the dark multiverse in Dark Nights: Metal, a new evil is unleashed upon the galaxy. The four Omega Titans each represent one of the fundamental energies of sentient life: entropy, wisdom, wonder and mystery. When Wisdom attacks Brainiac’s home planet, Brainiac brings together all the galaxy’s heroes, villains and monsters to fight together using his sophisticated plan. Brainiac is unable to explain his plan fully when tragedy strikes him—leaving the new team forced to fight the Omega Titans on their own. It’s great to see all the gang working together against a common enemy. Also, the plot forces entities that usually rely on their brawn to start using their brain. The art is beautiful as usual but the plot is the star here. Since I love a good plot, 5 stars! Highly recommended for all superhero comic fans. I can’t wait for the next episode. Thanks to the publisher, DC Comics, and NetGalley for an advanced copy.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Kat

    Basic plot: Brainiac kidnaps a bunch of heroes and villains to deal with a threat to the planet Colu. Of course there is more to it than that. Honestly, since I haven't read the Metal books, I was more than a little confused. The story felt disjointed and the art was very inconsistent. I can tell that the story is giving important info for the story to come, but still, there were issues left unaddressed, which was frustrating. It wasn't awful, but there were holes and gaps that needed filling.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Max's Comic Reviews and Lists

    Zzzzzzz......... Oh my good lord Snyder. I love you man but Jesus this...this was rough. No Justice takes place after the excellent Dark Nights Metal. The source wall is broken and there is yet another universe ending event. AGAIN. I couldn’t get into this one. Like what so ever. It was torture to read. You wanna know how to make a universe ending justice league story boring? Read this shite. I am not going to go light on this story. I don’t care. This book is 99.999% expo-fucking-sition. If yo Zzzzzzz......... Oh my good lord Snyder. I love you man but Jesus this...this was rough. No Justice takes place after the excellent Dark Nights Metal. The source wall is broken and there is yet another universe ending event. AGAIN. I couldn’t get into this one. Like what so ever. It was torture to read. You wanna know how to make a universe ending justice league story boring? Read this shite. I am not going to go light on this story. I don’t care. This book is 99.999% expo-fucking-sition. If you have this much lore and explanation behind your cosmic event, of course you have to ramble on and on and on and on and on and on and on and on and on and on and on and on about how to solve it with no heart or soul behind it. What a SNOOOOZE!! This book has no soul. It’s just a sloppy set up for the main Justice League title. Do you know how much of a drag it is to think you are nearly done an issue of pure exposition but then like an idiot flip ahead to see how far you actually are.....and you still have like 10 pages left. I wanted to put the book down so bad. Did I emphasize that the book was boring yet? If you think I am the kinda guy who just wants to read a bunch of action, go look at my reviews for Hellblazer Dangerous Habits, Alias or even V for Vendetta. I love more than anything, a well written and emotional dialogue scene that has some serious bite to it. This is just pureeeellllllyyyy EXXXXPOSSSSITIONNNN!!!! The amount of fuckin text on display rivals the goddamn Tin tin books or silver age Superman stuff. It went in one ear and out the other even when I tried to concentrate. In terms of the characterization, there is over 20 characters in this book. No one other than Starro, Beast Boy, Amanda Waller, and Green Arrow has a clear personality. Everybody’s dialogue is basically interchangeable and no one shines. I LOVE the idea of splitting everyone up into cool ass teams but it really doesn’t matter in the long run. Everyone does the same shit. The entire concept of this event is so over the top. And for it to be resolved in 4 issues, is ridiculous. Especially a problem of this caliber. The villain is.....interesting. But not in a good way. He is set up as a big ass threat in issue 2 but just gets treated like a joke for the rest of the series. Plus his motivations are cliched as fook. He literally says “No matter”, and then goes on to explain some old tired villain bullcrap. The art besides issue 3 is amazing in my opinion. Not crazy about some of the panel layout but damn did Manipul have to draw a shit ton for this. Seriously man. With the over abundance of characters we got on display, the sheer amount of penciling that had to be done is just astounding. God I really hated this book. This is exactly how you shouldn’t write a huge event with trillions of characters. Barely a shred of entertainment came from this book. If this was more than 4 issues I think I might of put the book down. I know how harsh I’ve been. But nothing I have said in this review is false or exaggerated. The reading experience was really as boring and lifeless as I have said. This kind of reminded me of my experience watching Jurassic World Fallen Kingdom. There was some cool shit in that movie, but in the end I saw right through the gorgeous effects and knew how poorly it was written. Same exact thing here man. I saw right through the layers of Manipul’s fantastic artwork and know how poorly this was written. Letter Grade: (D-)

  18. 4 out of 5

    Patrick

    I really wanted to enjoy this more than I did. The talent on this book is outstanding for the most part. And I think the idea of multiple Justice Leagues is an interesting one. Led by Batman, Superman, Wonder Woman.. etc. Unfortunately I found this a bit messy at times and how the panel were placed made it a difficult read, at times. For me. It was cool to see how many character were utilized and that's probably my favorite aspect of this book.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Georgie

    This was so boooooooooring, like it took me hours to read this, and it’s only 4 issues, the team idea is cool but it’s written so poorly, don’t buy this.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Alan

    These four issues have so many flaws, but the strange thing is that I enjoyed this more than the recent Avengers mega story from Marvel (which is so memorable that I can't even recall the event's name). Building off of what he did in Metal, and using a principle Jack Kirby created nearly 50 years ago in The New Gods, Snyder takes the hole in the Source Wall to give us a Big Threat (actually cue Kirby again see: The Eternals-if you're going to borrow, borrow from the best). These four giant elder These four issues have so many flaws, but the strange thing is that I enjoyed this more than the recent Avengers mega story from Marvel (which is so memorable that I can't even recall the event's name). Building off of what he did in Metal, and using a principle Jack Kirby created nearly 50 years ago in The New Gods, Snyder takes the hole in the Source Wall to give us a Big Threat (actually cue Kirby again see: The Eternals-if you're going to borrow, borrow from the best). These four giant elder beings are coming to judge worlds and eat them while they're at it. All right that might be an over simplification of the plot, but the pacing is pretty much pedal to the metal. Characterization, we don't need no stinking characterization. Reason for heroes and villains to team-up, ah we'll go with one so far out there no one will pay much attention to it. Its sort of fun, and the art holds up. The characters stay true to form, and points to Snyder to throwing some items in there that will be popping up in DC titles in the next year (my guess).

  21. 4 out of 5

    Marco

    Another shitload of typical Snyderish garbage. With wonderful art, though. Not as terrible as Metal, but it's still pure trash.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Zaheer Alam

    beautiful art + amazing story = masterpiece.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Chris Lemmerman

    [Read as single issues] In the wake of Dark Nights: Metal, the Source Wall that surrounds the multiverse lies broken, and new threats from beyond the wall have set their sights on our dimension. When Brainiac arrives on Earth with news of the Omega Titans, four enormous beings that feed on the universal constants of Mystery, Entropy, Wisdom, and Wonder, heroes and villains alike must unite to save Brainiac’s homeworld, before they turn their attention to Earth. You’ve got to hand it to Scott Snyde [Read as single issues] In the wake of Dark Nights: Metal, the Source Wall that surrounds the multiverse lies broken, and new threats from beyond the wall have set their sights on our dimension. When Brainiac arrives on Earth with news of the Omega Titans, four enormous beings that feed on the universal constants of Mystery, Entropy, Wisdom, and Wonder, heroes and villains alike must unite to save Brainiac’s homeworld, before they turn their attention to Earth. You’ve got to hand it to Scott Snyder – he hears the phrase ‘go big or go home’ and doesn’t even wait for the end before he’s out making the most noise and blowing up the most stuff as possible. After Dark Nights: Metal, you’d think he’d take a breather for five minutes, but instead he launches the entire DC Universe into another massive story featuring almost all of your favourite heroes and villains united against a common threat, and with it shaping the landscape of the DCU and the next batch of upcoming stories along with it. No Justice is full throttle from the first page, and then we hit the ground running and don’t stop until the last page of issue four. Despite the huge amount of characters involved, Snyder manages to set up the story, explain the background, and drive everything to a satisfying conclusion without stumbling at all; he’s well practised at this kind of thing at this point, but it’s still fun to watch him work. He even manages to set up a subplot involving Amanda Waller and Green Arrow that pays off in his own book without batting an eyelid. The driving force behind No Justice feels a bit Mcguffin-y, but it opens up a lot of avenues for exploration after the series concludes and the New Justice line launches. The team-ups between characters are unexpected, but Snyder manages to use all of the disparate characters to his advantage, even if it’s just for one or two scenes across the four issues. There are even some breakouts you’d never expect – read issue 3, and tell me that Starro isn’t one of your favourite characters now, I dare you. Again, this also acts as a springboard for new stories; no one that survives this story comes out of it unchanged – they either know something or have become something different which will inform them going forward. Of course, the artwork isn’t too shabby either. With Francis Manapul on the first, second, and fourth issues, the visuals could not be better. Manapul’s one of my favourite artists, and he turns out some beautiful work here. He’s assisted in the second issue by Marcus To, while To and Riley Rossmo team up for the third issue. Rossmo’s a bit too pointy in style to fit in with Manapul’s smooth lines, but he and To make a decent combination, and help with the more busy panels of the middle issues, leaving Manapul free to let loose where appropriate with some gorgeous splash pages or wide panels. No Justice is another home run for Scott Snyder and friends. It’s fast paced, full of action, full of heart, and a rollercoaster ride from the first page to the last with superb artwork from one of the industry’s best; if this is the set-up for what’s to come next, New Justice is going to be a golden age for DC.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Kyle Berk

    Justice League: No Justice is overcrowded. Part of me knows that's the point to have all these heroes in a Justice League title, but because of that the writers try to give everybody a line and people say things that are only slightly in character if at all. And the story lacks a cohesive interpersonal focus. But there is some fun superheroes have to save the world action here and that part I enjoyed. I enjoy that there are teams and it isn't as big of a cluster as it could be. And the idea of th Justice League: No Justice is overcrowded. Part of me knows that's the point to have all these heroes in a Justice League title, but because of that the writers try to give everybody a line and people say things that are only slightly in character if at all. And the story lacks a cohesive interpersonal focus. But there is some fun superheroes have to save the world action here and that part I enjoyed. I enjoy that there are teams and it isn't as big of a cluster as it could be. And the idea of things changing in the wake of an event comic? I would love for more of those to stick. Your primary leaders are Batman, Superman, Wonder Woman, Cyborg, and Martian Manhunter who gets some focus here which is fantastic. As well as the Braniacs. My main problem with this is that it drowns you in exposition like a Metal Gear Solid game, and you just need air sometimes. There's so much sci fi what as whos its being said that you have to read over these large text bubbles again and again. And it gets boring. Also the art starts off good but then another artist took over and the quality of that style (because there is a very specific style here) drops and it's muddy to look at. Listen I love the DC universe so most of the crap that was being slung at me I got what they were saying ( and because I read Metal which you pretty much have to if you want to read this) but it went on for so long in areas it didn't always need to. I liked this enough to give it 3 stars, but it's the epitome of continuity keep up where it exists to set up other stuff as opposed to being its own story. And I like continuity fine, but I prefer a great story to something like this so I can only hope this will lead to that. 3 stars.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Blindzider

    Just when I was giving props to Snyder for the generally decent All-Star Batman Vol. 3, I read this rehashed, confusing and boring story. A sort-of sequel to Dark Metal, the heroes have to deal with the ramifications of that crossover in which they've unleashed some Marvel Celestial-like beings. These things somehow/why want to eat? a seed? buried in Earth? Sounds very similar to Marvel's Earth-X story. The rest is standard: grab as many heroes as you can, mix them up so they don't get along and Just when I was giving props to Snyder for the generally decent All-Star Batman Vol. 3, I read this rehashed, confusing and boring story. A sort-of sequel to Dark Metal, the heroes have to deal with the ramifications of that crossover in which they've unleashed some Marvel Celestial-like beings. These things somehow/why want to eat? a seed? buried in Earth? Sounds very similar to Marvel's Earth-X story. The rest is standard: grab as many heroes as you can, mix them up so they don't get along and fight among themselves, yet still somehow come together to save the world/universe. There's waving of the hands when it comes to the how they actually accomplish this, but hey it's an epic crossover! Who cares? I know I don't.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Lukasz

    Well. I’ve never been Justice League’s biggest fan, but I usually enjoy their stories. Not the case here. No Justice is a mess of the story. Consider it a team-up of every (almost) DC character ever. Brainiac creates new teams in a way that should guarantee their maximum efficiency in kicking godlike creature’s arses.  The pages are filled with pointless exposition, contrived and dumb plot, and poor character’s dynamics.  No Justice is a waste of time. ARC through NetGalley

  27. 4 out of 5

    Lauren Paletta

    Eh

  28. 5 out of 5

    Heather

    I loved watching all my favorite DC teams mixing it up and defending Earth together.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Mimi

    This super-sized team-up was so exciting! omg omg omg..... I can't even think straight. Brilliant. So curious ow tis storyline will be carried further.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Sarospice

    This ends up being a two star mess. Lots words for very little set-up of the three titles launched out of this. Time for Snyder to give up the keys to the DCU and let someone else drive for awhile.

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