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The Why I Write series is based on the Windham-Campbell Lectures, delivered annually to commemorate the awarding of the Donald Windham–Sandy M. Campbell Literature Prizes at Yale University. Administered by Yale’s Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library, the series publishes works based on the lecture given by the event’s keynote speaker.   The series launched in 2017 wi The Why I Write series is based on the Windham-Campbell Lectures, delivered annually to commemorate the awarding of the Donald Windham–Sandy M. Campbell Literature Prizes at Yale University. Administered by Yale’s Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library, the series publishes works based on the lecture given by the event’s keynote speaker.   The series launched in 2017 with the release of Devotion, by renowned musician, artist, and author Patti Smith. This new volume is by internationally best-selling author Karl Ove Knausgaard, and future editions will come from Pulitzer Prize winner Hilton Als and poet-playwright Elizabeth Alexander, who recited her poetry at the 2009 presidential inauguration of Barack Obama.


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The Why I Write series is based on the Windham-Campbell Lectures, delivered annually to commemorate the awarding of the Donald Windham–Sandy M. Campbell Literature Prizes at Yale University. Administered by Yale’s Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library, the series publishes works based on the lecture given by the event’s keynote speaker.   The series launched in 2017 wi The Why I Write series is based on the Windham-Campbell Lectures, delivered annually to commemorate the awarding of the Donald Windham–Sandy M. Campbell Literature Prizes at Yale University. Administered by Yale’s Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library, the series publishes works based on the lecture given by the event’s keynote speaker.   The series launched in 2017 with the release of Devotion, by renowned musician, artist, and author Patti Smith. This new volume is by internationally best-selling author Karl Ove Knausgaard, and future editions will come from Pulitzer Prize winner Hilton Als and poet-playwright Elizabeth Alexander, who recited her poetry at the 2009 presidential inauguration of Barack Obama.

30 review for Inadvertent

  1. 5 out of 5

    Lee

    Reads almost like a re-mixed excerpt from My Struggle Book Five’s parts about writing. A typo on page 7 (“than” instead of “that”) on a page about trust made me distrust this one’s publication at first, thinking it a little money-grubby, but that slight initial sense fell away as the old familiar voice and progress through internal and external worlds established themselves. No one mentions KOK in the same breath as Kerouac, even if both were deeply inspired by Proust and KOK's "inadvertent" met Reads almost like a re-mixed excerpt from My Struggle Book Five’s parts about writing. A typo on page 7 (“than” instead of “that”) on a page about trust made me distrust this one’s publication at first, thinking it a little money-grubby, but that slight initial sense fell away as the old familiar voice and progress through internal and external worlds established themselves. No one mentions KOK in the same breath as Kerouac, even if both were deeply inspired by Proust and KOK's "inadvertent" method echoes Kerouac's essentials of spontaneous prose. KOK also doesn't acknowledge that under-prestigious author with the tripthong surname -- he talks about canonical biggies Hamsun, Tolstoy, Borges, Cervantes, Joyce. Large print, 92 pages, a nice little red hardback if you take the dust jacket off. Interesting how effective even the slightest formal restraint is for him. What he writes is the inadvertent intuitive result of the form he imposes from the beginning. The form reveals the content instead of being something he reveals. Mostly worth it for completists, probably, although also maybe the best introduction to his thought processes, style, approach? I also liked that he reveres W&P, which I took a day's break from to read this. And I like how he talked about books as places where readers can go. Which reminds me of Frank Conroy banging the table, saying something like "we don't care about ideas or situations -- listen, this is coming from a lifetime of reading -- we care about worlds!" And furthermore I liked reading about KOK's failures, not only his early failed attempts, the novel his friend told him that wasn't good enough, but also the failed attempts (800 pages) of writing about his father's death, among other projects that he ultimately decided were not working. In all cases, when it does work for him, it's effortless, in that it's immersive and intuitive, more like reading, like he's following what he's creating.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Darwin8u

    "Thoughts are the enemy of the inadvertent, for if one thinks about how something will seem to others, if one thinks about if something is important or good enough, if one begins to calculate or pretend, then it is no longer inadvertent and accessable as itself, but only as what we have made it into." - Karl Ove Knausgaard, Inadvertent The second book published in the Windam-Campbell and Yale Press series 'Why I Write'. This short book is the lecture Knausgaard gave at the 2017 Windam-Campbell Pr "Thoughts are the enemy of the inadvertent, for if one thinks about how something will seem to others, if one thinks about if something is important or good enough, if one begins to calculate or pretend, then it is no longer inadvertent and accessable as itself, but only as what we have made it into." - Karl Ove Knausgaard, Inadvertent The second book published in the Windam-Campbell and Yale Press series 'Why I Write'. This short book is the lecture Knausgaard gave at the 2017 Windam-Campbell Prize ceremony at Yale. Knausgaard reflects on why he writes and his approach to writing. He travels a lot of the same ground he has traveled in his fiction, auto-biographical fiction, and his writing about art. He describes his motivations, inspiriations, frustrations, and theories of literature, art, life, form, and writing. Some of my favorite gems from this book: "Literature is not primarily a place for truths, it is the space where truths play out." (pg 2). "That is what writing is: creating a space in which something can be said." (pg 3). "All language casts a shadow, and that shadow can be more or less apprehended, but never quite controlled" (pg 13). "Writing is about making something accessable, allowing something to reveal itself." (pg 27). "This is because I have hit upon it inadvertently, or it has to hit upon me. It is one thing to know somehthing, another to write about it and often knowing stands in the way of writing." (pg 40). "Yes, I write because I want to open the world." (pg 46). "What we seek in art is meaning. The meaningful carries an obligation. With obligation comes consequences." (pg 65). "This was what I had been longing for. This was writing. To lose sight of yourself, and yet to use yourself, or that part of yourself that was beyond the control of your ego. And then to see something foreign appear on the page in front of you." (pg 81).

  3. 5 out of 5

    Campbell

    Karl Ove discourses on why he writes. He doesn't answer the question, but the way in which he didn't answer it was interesting and engaging. Edited: for clarity

  4. 5 out of 5

    Ada

    4,3. Realment és un home molt peculiar.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Mads Holm

    Karl Ove Knausgårds ‘Uforvarende’ er en smuk refleksion over, hvordan det at læse og skrive er en konstant uforudsigelig proces, der hverken lader sig indfange af såkaldte regler for skrivning eller guidelines for den “gode litteratur”. I poetik-serien ‘Lese, skrive’ har det norske forlag Forlaget Oktober inviteret udvalgte forfattere til at reflektere over egen skrivning og læsning. I den forbindelse har Karl Ove Knausgård skrevet essayet ‘Uforvarende’. Her bliver læseren ikke bare præsenteret Karl Ove Knausgårds ‘Uforvarende’ er en smuk refleksion over, hvordan det at læse og skrive er en konstant uforudsigelig proces, der hverken lader sig indfange af såkaldte regler for skrivning eller guidelines for den “gode litteratur”. I poetik-serien ‘Lese, skrive’ har det norske forlag Forlaget Oktober inviteret udvalgte forfattere til at reflektere over egen skrivning og læsning. I den forbindelse har Karl Ove Knausgård skrevet essayet ‘Uforvarende’. Her bliver læseren ikke bare præsenteret for svarene på, hvorfor Knausgård skriver, men får lov til at følge forfatterens erindringer om læsning og skrivning helt fra barnsben, op igennem ungdommen og frem til i dag. Inkluderet er endda skriveprocessen bag essayet. “Spørgsmålet om hvorfor jeg skriver, høres enkelt ut […]”, men det er muligvis det spørgsmål, Knausgård har sværest ved at svare på. For enkeltheden er forræderisk, og det er netop denne problemstilling, Knausgård forsøger at skrive sig ud af i ‘Uforvarende’. Dette er ikke en nem opgave, og han beretter ærligt, om hvordan han har siddet og stirret på det blanke dokument på computerskærm i flere dage, før ordene i begyndte at flyde. Det at skrive er altså sjældent en dans på gloser for Knausgård, tværtimod betegner han processen som en konstant kamp. Et ord, der vækker genklang hos den erfarne Knausgård-læser. Det er nemlig svært at sige Knausgård uden at nævne det omfattende romanprojekt ‘Min kamp’, som består af seks voluminøse bind, der ligesom ‘Uforvarende’ tager sit afsæt i Knausgårds eget liv. Knausgårds bøger er ved anledning blevet sammenlignet med cigaretters virkning på teenagere. Det tager tid at vænne sig til smagen, men når man først er hooked, så kan man ikke stoppe igen. Det samme gør sig gældende med ‘Uforvarende’. Knausgårds sprog flyder med essayformens strøm og gør det nemt for læseren at nyde bogen i ét træk. Flere steder skriver Knausgård smukke og sigende passager omkring det at skrive, som har den effekt, at man stopper op og bliver nødt til at vende tilbage for at læse dem igen og igen. Særligt bemærkelsesværdig er en passage, hvor Knausgård illustrerer det uforvarende med fænomenet pindsvin i haven: "Det er som med pinnsvinene i hagen her, det er to av dem, og vil jeg se dem slik de er for seg selv, må jeg sitte helt stille i en stol og vente til skumringen faller og de kommer ut fra skjulestedet sitt [...] Det omvendte kan også hende, at jeg på vei over tunet i mørket plutselig sparker til en av dem, da ruller den bortover steinleggingen som en ball. " Knausgårds ‘Uforvarende’ er altså langt fra et essay om, hvordan man skriver godt, eller om hvordan man bliver en god forfatter. Det er derimod et intimt og yderst velskrevet essay om, hvordan det at skrive er en konstant venten - en venten på inspiration, på gennembruddet, på pindsvinene i haven - ja, på det uforvarende. Af Christine Dimke, Mads Holm og Kristine Strandsby, studerende ved AU. https://litteratursiden.dk/boeger/hvo...

  6. 4 out of 5

    David Svinth

    Der findes ikke noget simpelt svar på, hvorfor Karl Ove Knausgård skriver. Det er hovedpointen i denne lille bog om skrivning og læsning af litteratur. Jeg var ret vild med hans forsvar for romanen overfor tv-serien som dens afløser. Gode argumenter. Bogen er på 70 sider og har en vejledende udsalgspris på 200kr, så måske en af årsagerne til at skrive også er pengene? Den del blev ikke belyst så tydeligt.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Margrete Dyvik

    Knausgård har en så sterk stemme at du kan kjenne ham igjen etter å ha lest én setning. I denne boken forteller han om sine tanker rundt skriving og skjønnlitteratur, og i kjent stil blottlegger han seg fullstendig. Det er både oppløftende og interessant å se hvordan en så suksessrik forfatter en gang startet. At han ble refusert og ikke hadde tro på seg selv. At det var vanskelig for ham å se kamerater og studievenner komme igjennom hos forlag mens han selv satt igjen. Det såreste partiet var det Knausgård har en så sterk stemme at du kan kjenne ham igjen etter å ha lest én setning. I denne boken forteller han om sine tanker rundt skriving og skjønnlitteratur, og i kjent stil blottlegger han seg fullstendig. Det er både oppløftende og interessant å se hvordan en så suksessrik forfatter en gang startet. At han ble refusert og ikke hadde tro på seg selv. At det var vanskelig for ham å se kamerater og studievenner komme igjennom hos forlag mens han selv satt igjen. Det såreste partiet var det som handlet om hans far. Anbefaler alle å lese boken.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Benedikte

    "The thoughts of what others will think, of whether this is any good or not, all criticism and self-criticism, all reflection and judgment must be put aside for trust to develop. In this sense, writing must be open and innocent." In de reeks "Why I write" geeft de Noorse bestsellerauteur Karl Ove Knausgård zijn kijk op de kunst en het ambacht van het schrijven. Ook wie - comme moi - nog nooit een roman van de man las, heeft aan dit boekje een aangename en ontspannende hap vakliteratuur. Knausgård "The thoughts of what others will think, of whether this is any good or not, all criticism and self-criticism, all reflection and judgment must be put aside for trust to develop. In this sense, writing must be open and innocent." In de reeks "Why I write" geeft de Noorse bestsellerauteur Karl Ove Knausgård zijn kijk op de kunst en het ambacht van het schrijven. Ook wie - comme moi - nog nooit een roman van de man las, heeft aan dit boekje een aangename en ontspannende hap vakliteratuur. Knausgård vertelt hoe zijn proza tot stand komt en hoeveel moeite het heeft gekost om daar zijn beroep van te maken. Bevriende schrijvers, pogingen om deze of gene stijl na te bootsen, invloeden van grootmeesters à la Stendhal en Proust: ze hebben zijn leerproces gemaakt tot wat het is. Het knappe aan dit essay (en dus ook aan de mens Knausgård) is dat hij het onbewuste, het ongedwongene centraal stelt. Voor hem is schrijven geen code die je strikt moet volgen of een welbepaalde techniek die je onder de knie moet krijgen. Het spontaan creëren met woorden en 'zien' wat er uit die creaties groeit, is wat schrijven zo fantastisch en inspirerend maakt: (...) for me all writing is blind and intuitive Ondanks zijn populariteit onderstreept de auteur ook dat je met schrijven nooit helemaal klaar bent. Elke nieuwe poging om iets op papier te zetten, is de stille vraag om gelezen te worden door een publiek én de verplichting aan jezelf om het minstens even goed of nog beter te doen dan de vorige keer. Dit hele essay pent Knausgård helder, pretentieloos en prozaïsch neer. Daarmee bevestigt de man (alweer: onbewust) waartoe zijn pen echt in staat is. Note to self: na deze kleine, fijne ontdekking moet ik me vooral in 's mans échte romans gaan verdiepen. Iets voor na de jaarwissel!

  9. 5 out of 5

    Reid

    This book is like a slight touch of profundity, if you ask me. What he writes here, about spontaneous non-self-conscious prose writing, smacks heavily of Zen Buddhism and the illusion of free will. He might as well say, and pretty much does say, that he enters the zone and becomes the word, becomes the flow of words. The thoughts and words flow out of him in automatic fashion and only when they're on the page does he realize what he's written: to whit, in near-summation on the 2nd to last page: This book is like a slight touch of profundity, if you ask me. What he writes here, about spontaneous non-self-conscious prose writing, smacks heavily of Zen Buddhism and the illusion of free will. He might as well say, and pretty much does say, that he enters the zone and becomes the word, becomes the flow of words. The thoughts and words flow out of him in automatic fashion and only when they're on the page does he realize what he's written: to whit, in near-summation on the 2nd to last page: "...for me all writing is blind and intuitive, it either works or it doesn't, and any explanation of why a novel turned out the way it did will always be an ex post facto rationalization. Whatever works will force its way out in the end, as if by itself." There are plenty of good quotes to further elucidate his thinking on the subject, and there's also a focus on how he believes that form constraints help his writing in unpredictable and constructive ways, but again, as though automatic. He also talks about the influence of Proust, and Joyce and Hamsun, Turgenev and Tolstoy, and Le Guin, among others, and that, too, is a pleasure to read of how and why they influenced his conceptual frame of writing compelling prose. A lot of this felt personal to me, and that's one of his goals, to write so personally and honestly that readers cannot see any construction or design.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Dylan Perry

    The honesty on display here is raw, real, and appreciated. Because as interesting as the highs are—the success stories, breaking out as an author and gaining acolytes—to me, the creative lows are just as fascinating. And Karl Ove Knausgaard doesn’t hold back. He goes into detail about the years that went in between projects. Talks about how he labors, churning out page after page and yet still the story wouldn’t work. How he almost reinvents how he writes to get it to where he wants. This isn’t The honesty on display here is raw, real, and appreciated. Because as interesting as the highs are—the success stories, breaking out as an author and gaining acolytes—to me, the creative lows are just as fascinating. And Karl Ove Knausgaard doesn’t hold back. He goes into detail about the years that went in between projects. Talks about how he labors, churning out page after page and yet still the story wouldn’t work. How he almost reinvents how he writes to get it to where he wants. This isn’t something we hear from many modern authors without the word, or feeling, of ‘failure’ closely associated. And to hear it come from a big name writer is refreshing. Between this and his essay in Light the Dark, I’m beyond ready to check out his longer works. 4.5/5

  11. 5 out of 5

    James

    It has a slow start, and a sudden ending, but overall it’s enjoyable to read Knausgaard’s thoughts on why he writes, or what led him to write in the way he does.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Tom

    This essay could stand as an out-take from My Struggle: Knausgaard reflecting on why he does what he does, (sometimes) who gets hurt, and what the whole point of that is.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Melting Uncle

    So nice I listened to the audiobook twice. I think this would actually be a good first book if you've never read this author. Lots of cool KOK anecdotes including his attempt to watch Game of Thrones. I can't think of anything negative to say about this!

  14. 5 out of 5

    Andy

    Within about one month we get three Knausgaard books. Summer, Inadvertent, My Struggle #6. It’s been a good month and My Struggle is out in 7 days. As for this book, it’s really just an essay/speech he gave about why he writes. It’s interesting as he wrestles with the intricacies of the answer to that question. He is quite honest about his motivations and aspirations for his work and for art in general. Some of the book seems almost verbatim from a few sections of My Struggle. But it’s only a sm Within about one month we get three Knausgaard books. Summer, Inadvertent, My Struggle #6. It’s been a good month and My Struggle is out in 7 days. As for this book, it’s really just an essay/speech he gave about why he writes. It’s interesting as he wrestles with the intricacies of the answer to that question. He is quite honest about his motivations and aspirations for his work and for art in general. Some of the book seems almost verbatim from a few sections of My Struggle. But it’s only a small fraction of the overall essay. It’s strengths were in asking some big questions about humanity and the world and then asking more questions and wrestling with it all. There isn’t a clean answer but it is somewhere between the real, or outer and the ideal, or inner, the part of us that words can’t do justice in communicating. It’s another solid Knausgaard read, if you’re a fan.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Krystina

    This is an incredible essay in which the author answers the question, “why do I write?” He thinks back to his childhood love of reading, how when he read, he was alone but never felt it. How there are spans of his childhood that are “memoryless” (oh gosh, that word alone had me putting my hand to my heart), yet he can remember the day he was playing in the snow and his mother came home and gave him what would be his favorite book and he remembers reading it right away and connecting with the cha This is an incredible essay in which the author answers the question, “why do I write?” He thinks back to his childhood love of reading, how when he read, he was alone but never felt it. How there are spans of his childhood that are “memoryless” (oh gosh, that word alone had me putting my hand to my heart), yet he can remember the day he was playing in the snow and his mother came home and gave him what would be his favorite book and he remembers reading it right away and connecting with the characters and feeling something new. That’s part of the reason he writes. He talks about his father and their not-so-great relationship. How he rushed back home when he heard his father had died, and with the proof copy of his first novel in his briefcase, he realized he wrote it for his dad, to make his dad feel something. That something could never happen now. So there are some reasons that he writes that even he doesn’t always understand in the moment. He springboards his essay with someone else’s answer, “I write because someday I’ll die.” It seemed flippant to him at first, but as he goes along, it seems to become more real to him. By fleshing out that memory of his first novel and his father, I think, really, he writes because *other* people will die and he wants to connect himself with them before that happens. Something I really loved about this work was how the author goes through phases of writing something good, and then not being a good writer for years, then having an a-ha moment where someone shows interest or something clicks, and then being able to “write good” again, only to return to being a bad writer for another stretch of time. That made me think about life differently because this hot & cold thing happens throughout my life where I cycle in and out of a portion of my being that seems to be good/bad at certain things. The author is so matter of fact in that sometimes your talent goes away and sometimes it comes back. No stress. He also writes about negative reactions to his work, and how that hurts. There’s so much realness in this essay. It’s beautiful. I can’t wait to dive into his books.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Brenda

    I need to buy a copy of this book so I may freely highlight the many passages and thoughts that jumped out at me. I’ve never read anything by this author, but have heard of him. I found myself deeply fascinated by what he explained, as he tried to successfully describe why he writes, and found this tiny book full of so much insight to be a revelation and sadly, much too short! As someone who has tried to write throughout my life, faced self-doubt and crippling block, most of the time self-inflic I need to buy a copy of this book so I may freely highlight the many passages and thoughts that jumped out at me. I’ve never read anything by this author, but have heard of him. I found myself deeply fascinated by what he explained, as he tried to successfully describe why he writes, and found this tiny book full of so much insight to be a revelation and sadly, much too short! As someone who has tried to write throughout my life, faced self-doubt and crippling block, most of the time self-inflicted, there was so much here to identify with, so much that I need to reread and keep close. Hopefully, I’ll read more by this author. And soon! And sooner still, I have to purchase a copy of this essay. That is a must!

  17. 4 out of 5

    Scott Lee

    A beautiful meditation on writing, literature, reading and life. Knausgaard's descriptions here are simultaneously crystal clear and opaque as smoked glass. In the way most writing about writing is that is descriptive and confessional rather than didactic. And as is true of all writing (and all art) this book, even if unintentionally, is as much about the artist as the art, the author as the story it tells, the writer as the information it conveys. It drew me in and tossed me around. I was shock A beautiful meditation on writing, literature, reading and life. Knausgaard's descriptions here are simultaneously crystal clear and opaque as smoked glass. In the way most writing about writing is that is descriptive and confessional rather than didactic. And as is true of all writing (and all art) this book, even if unintentionally, is as much about the artist as the art, the author as the story it tells, the writer as the information it conveys. It drew me in and tossed me around. I was shocked by bits, loved others, found myself both at home and awash on a strange sea I'd never traveled nor would ever have traveled had I not picked up this book. I couldn't ask for anything more.

  18. 4 out of 5

    John

    Let's keep this party going, volume 7.25 (a joke but I count Home and Away as 6.5, and the book three of the Quartet series as another half book). Inadvertent is a meta view of why Knausgard writes. It's a quarter of a My Struggle book. It's about why Karl Ove writes and his reflections on it; and what books jar him--A Wizard of Earthsea, Ulysses/The Dead, Madame Bovary, The Idiot, Hunger, War and Peace, Borges, Proust, and not Kundera, etc. At a slim 92 pages, this probably makes me a shy under Let's keep this party going, volume 7.25 (a joke but I count Home and Away as 6.5, and the book three of the Quartet series as another half book). Inadvertent is a meta view of why Knausgard writes. It's a quarter of a My Struggle book. It's about why Karl Ove writes and his reflections on it; and what books jar him--A Wizard of Earthsea, Ulysses/The Dead, Madame Bovary, The Idiot, Hunger, War and Peace, Borges, Proust, and not Kundera, etc. At a slim 92 pages, this probably makes me a shy under 6,000 of Knausgaard's work (I can't recall if I included "A Time for Everything" but I kind of doubt it.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Zac Smith

    didn't realize til after i bought it that it's just a speech he gave somewhere, not a special book object with its own literary merit. so it's mostly a rehash of some of the themes, ideas, and stories from book 5. i like his analysis of the question, how we navigate from too pretentious to too stupid and all in between. i liked his brief discussion of trends in literary analysis. but overall this is short and not super gripping. not worth the $20 hardcover -- it's like size 13 font with huge mar didn't realize til after i bought it that it's just a speech he gave somewhere, not a special book object with its own literary merit. so it's mostly a rehash of some of the themes, ideas, and stories from book 5. i like his analysis of the question, how we navigate from too pretentious to too stupid and all in between. i liked his brief discussion of trends in literary analysis. but overall this is short and not super gripping. not worth the $20 hardcover -- it's like size 13 font with huge margins and like 70 pages. would fit better in a collection of essays or something.

  20. 4 out of 5

    York Underwood

    There is something intoxicating about his writing and I'm not quite sure what it is...yet. His metaphors can be cliche–that's probably more of a cliche to say at this point–but you feel a closeness to him that carries you along, paragraph by paragraph. After a while you don't feel like you're reading. You feel like these are your thoughts, this is your world, your essay and you're just dying to get it out on paper. I have to count myself a fan, as always.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Fredrikke Wongraven

    karl ove knausgård has become my favourite author after the "my struggle"-series and when i heard about this book i just had to get it. it did not disappoint. knausgård manages to amaze me once again. the way he describes writing really resonates with me and i think his writing exercises seemed interesting. i would recommend this book to any person who wants to write a book (which is probably all of us).

  22. 4 out of 5

    LongTrang117

    Love this dude. Beautiful little book (essay) on 'why he writes'. He's got some ideas, in his typically simple but eloquently tangled way. If you're going to spend the time to read Karl Ove's 'My Struggle' series, perhaps a quick primer on his writing process would be beneficial. Great one hour keynote address for the 2017 Windham-Campbell Prizes, https://lithub.com/karl-ove-video/

  23. 4 out of 5

    Luis Borjas

    Knausgaard's takes his frank, insightful prose and applies it to the art of the metaliterary essay with success in this brief tome: you see the struggles and contradictions of someone with a vocation for writing with painful self-awareness of his place among the greats.

  24. 4 out of 5

    David W. Berner

    More Knausgaard insight and beautiful writing.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Melissa Stuart Barnett

    Another 5 star for Karl Ove.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Yunis Esa

    An essay about one's reflection and experience.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Tom

    A good book, of a piece with the My Struggle series in terms of investigating his motivations to be a writer.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Bob Peru

    for the completist.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Kent Winward

    Knausgard has set the bar so high for himself that this felt just a little bit short of the mark.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Didde Elnif

    Hvor er det dog en fornøjelse at læse et så velskrevet essay om, hvor svært det er at skrive.

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