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Flight or Fright

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Fasten your seatbelts for an anthology of turbulent tales curated by Stephen King and Bev Vincent. This exciting new anthology, perfect for airport or airplane reading, includes an original introduction and story notes for each story by Stephen King, along with brand new stories from Stephen King and Joe Hill. About the Book: Stephen King hates to fly. Now he and co-editor Be Fasten your seatbelts for an anthology of turbulent tales curated by Stephen King and Bev Vincent. This exciting new anthology, perfect for airport or airplane reading, includes an original introduction and story notes for each story by Stephen King, along with brand new stories from Stephen King and Joe Hill. About the Book: Stephen King hates to fly. Now he and co-editor Bev Vincent would like to share this fear of flying with you. Welcome to Flight or Fright, an anthology about all the things that can go horribly wrong when you're suspended six miles in the air, hurtling through space at more than 500 mph and sealed up in a metal tube (like—gulp!—a coffin) with hundreds of strangers. All the ways your trip into the friendly skies can turn into a nightmare, including some we'll bet you've never thought of before... but now you will the next time you walk down the jetway and place your fate in the hands of a total stranger. Featuring brand new stories by Joe Hill and Stephen King, as well as fourteen classic tales and one poem from the likes of Richard Matheson, Ray Bradbury, Roald Dahl, Dan Simmons, and many others, Flight or Fright is, as King says, "ideal airplane reading, especially on stormy descents... Even if you are safe on the ground, you might want to buckle up nice and tight."


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Fasten your seatbelts for an anthology of turbulent tales curated by Stephen King and Bev Vincent. This exciting new anthology, perfect for airport or airplane reading, includes an original introduction and story notes for each story by Stephen King, along with brand new stories from Stephen King and Joe Hill. About the Book: Stephen King hates to fly. Now he and co-editor Be Fasten your seatbelts for an anthology of turbulent tales curated by Stephen King and Bev Vincent. This exciting new anthology, perfect for airport or airplane reading, includes an original introduction and story notes for each story by Stephen King, along with brand new stories from Stephen King and Joe Hill. About the Book: Stephen King hates to fly. Now he and co-editor Bev Vincent would like to share this fear of flying with you. Welcome to Flight or Fright, an anthology about all the things that can go horribly wrong when you're suspended six miles in the air, hurtling through space at more than 500 mph and sealed up in a metal tube (like—gulp!—a coffin) with hundreds of strangers. All the ways your trip into the friendly skies can turn into a nightmare, including some we'll bet you've never thought of before... but now you will the next time you walk down the jetway and place your fate in the hands of a total stranger. Featuring brand new stories by Joe Hill and Stephen King, as well as fourteen classic tales and one poem from the likes of Richard Matheson, Ray Bradbury, Roald Dahl, Dan Simmons, and many others, Flight or Fright is, as King says, "ideal airplane reading, especially on stormy descents... Even if you are safe on the ground, you might want to buckle up nice and tight."

30 review for Flight or Fright

  1. 5 out of 5

    Sadie Hartmann Mother Horror

    Stephen King is afraid of something that I’m not. He’s afraid of flying. Don’t get me wrong, I have a lot of funky little fears and phobias, it’s just that flying isn’t one of them. So I saw this new anthology, aptly titled, Flight or Fright and I saw it as a personal dare from the King himself! Could he and his co-editor, Bev Vincent, curate a collection of stories that would seep through the cracks and unsettle my nerves enough to make me afraid to fly? There is a definitive answer here but bef Stephen King is afraid of something that I’m not. He’s afraid of flying. Don’t get me wrong, I have a lot of funky little fears and phobias, it’s just that flying isn’t one of them. So I saw this new anthology, aptly titled, Flight or Fright and I saw it as a personal dare from the King himself! Could he and his co-editor, Bev Vincent, curate a collection of stories that would seep through the cracks and unsettle my nerves enough to make me afraid to fly? There is a definitive answer here but before I tell you, let’s unpack my reader’s experience, shall we? The cover of the book reads, “17 Turbulent Tales” then you open the book to read the Table of Contents and a who’s who. Even though several of the stories are by some of my favorite authors, I was disappointed in the “Boys Only” guest list. There are several ladies of horror that I have enjoyed over the last few years that I would have loved to see a new story from, Ania Ahlborn, Kristi DeMeester, Nadia Bulkin or Alma Katsu just to name a few. A missed opportunity, for sure. Moving on, Stephen King’s intro. Having been a Constant Reader since I was thirteen and owning everything he has ever put out, I can say with confidence that King’s intros are some of my favorite. This is no exception, I will never tire of sitting at his feet and hearing his personal anecdotes. It was informative to have his fingerprints on each story as well; introducing each author with a blurb about the tale. Readers who love all kinds of genres, not just horror, will enjoy that there is something for everyone in this themed anthology: Something for sci-fi lovers, history buffs, thriller junkies...maybe you like social commentary, poetry, humor? I was really impressed with the wide range of voices, genres and styles represented here. Of course many people, myself included, will want to buy this for the new, original stories by Stephen King and his son, Joe Hill. A word about those two: I’m a huge fan of both their careers. I read all of their books. I stay updated on everything they do and I watch all the movie adaptations, TV shows and graphic novelizations I can get my hands on. That being said, I don’t mind being critical of their work. I get to be a fangirl and a reviewer at the same time. I was a little disappointed with both of their contributions to this collection. I wanted Stephen King’s offering to be meatier-the story felt like the bones of a good story but there was nothing to sink my teeth into--it was a bony tale with no fleshy bits. Joe Hill’s story, was quite the opposite actually, it seemed that Hill had a lot to say but with this being a short story collection, there wasn’t ample time to say it and I felt like this social commentary/terrorism thriller could have been more impactful with more time spent on building the story and characters. Overall, I loved spending time with several of my favorite authors including Dan Simmons, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, Ray Bradbury and Roald Dahl. Some standout stories for me was the first one, Cargo by E. Michael Lewis and Nightmare at 20,000 Feet by Richard Matheson. As I closed the book, I asked myself, Flight or Fright? And the answer was clear: FLIGHT! There’s a whole world out there I want to see and flying is the safest way to get around but you take the challenge and see for yourself.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Carol

    Welcome Aboard....or maybe not! It all begins with a scary as hell introduction from KING. Yikes! What a horrific flying experience he had. As for me, back in the olden days of 1969 on the way to Japan, we briefly stopped in Alaska and slid off the runway all the way to the fence. May not sound it, but it was indeed frightening. And, once on a flight from Los Angeles to Detroit, also in the late 60's, I experienced flying in a horrendous thunderstorm with lightening that seemed to last forever Welcome Aboard....or maybe not! It all begins with a scary as hell introduction from KING. Yikes! What a horrific flying experience he had. As for me, back in the olden days of 1969 on the way to Japan, we briefly stopped in Alaska and slid off the runway all the way to the fence. May not sound it, but it was indeed frightening. And, once on a flight from Los Angeles to Detroit, also in the late 60's, I experienced flying in a horrendous thunderstorm with lightening that seemed to last forever. We rocked and bobbed up and down; at times it felt like an elevator, but that wasn't the scariest part. I was flying without a companion and the big jetliner was practically empty....truly practically empty. Really felt alone....ominous flight for me. Anyway, FLIGHT OR FRIGHT is a variety of horror, sci-fi and murder-mystery plus one poem. There are plenty of spooked passengers (for various reasons) zombies, aliens and some super weird and creepy monster stuff as you travel these skies. My top six of seventeen favorites: 1) Joe Hill's - YOU ARE RELEASED. By far the best. (for me) Real life fear! 2) Roald Dahl's -YOU SHALL NOT GROW OLD. Memorable time travel. 3) Arthur Conan Doyle's - THE HORROR OF THE HEIGHTS. Wait till you see what's way up there in the danger zone! 4) Richard Matheson's - NIGHTMARE AT 20,000 FEET. Remember the freakish Twilight Zone episode? Here you go. 5) E. Michael Lewis' - CARGO. Creepy sad. 6) Stephen King's - THE TURBULENCE EXPERT. Mortal fear of flying required! Overall, a pretty darn fine anthology of old and new. Oh, and....Would I fly again? Absolutely! Just hope I don't forget to pack FLIGHT OR FRIGHT!

  3. 5 out of 5

    Helga

    3.5 Flight or Fright is a collection of horror/mystery short stories solely happening in midair. It is edited by Stephen King and also includes one of his short stories. My favorites were Two Minutes Forty-Five Seconds by Dan Simmons, You Are Released by Joe Hill and obviously The Turbulence Expert by Stephen King. Before each story there is also an introduction by the master himself. So, buckle up and fly high!

  4. 5 out of 5

    megs_bookrack

    I received this beauty in the mail today and am very excited to get started on this collection. I absolutely adore the synopsis of this one! I HATE flying with every fiber of my being. Yep. This should be great for my travel anxiety. 😑😯😝😨 Me when I fly:

  5. 5 out of 5

    Obsidian

    Eh. Definitely not worth the $9.99 I paid for this. A new anthology edited by Stephen King though equals I have to read it though. There were some truly what the hell did I just read reactions to some of the short stories, and a few good grief this is boring. I only really enjoyed four stories out of this collection (gave them five stars), and one of them is a story I am already familiar with. I did give some four stars, but the majority are three stars and below. "Cargo" by E. Michael Lewis (3 Eh. Definitely not worth the $9.99 I paid for this. A new anthology edited by Stephen King though equals I have to read it though. There were some truly what the hell did I just read reactions to some of the short stories, and a few good grief this is boring. I only really enjoyed four stories out of this collection (gave them five stars), and one of them is a story I am already familiar with. I did give some four stars, but the majority are three stars and below. "Cargo" by E. Michael Lewis (3 stars)-An interesting take on those who had to fly back the dead from the Jonestown massacre. It just really didn't do a thing for me though. I just needed it to be scarier or something. I felt like I was missing some key points or something while reading. "The Horror of the Heights" by Arthur Conan Doyle (2 stars)-I had to refresh my memory on this one since I didn't even recall it until I started my review. It was just a long form narrative about someone finding the notebook of a Mr. Joyce-Armstrong who was trying to break the height record of 30,000 feet. People who have tried to beat that record have been found dead. "Nightmare at 20,000 feet" by Richard Matheson (5 stars)-This is the original short story that inspired Twilight Zone the show and the movie later on. It was good to read, but honestly many of the readers will be familiar with it so it doesn't feel like new material. "The Flying Machine" by Ambrose Bierce (1 stars)- This story wasn't even a page. I initially thought I didn't get a full Kindle version of this book since the story just stops. "Lucifer" by E.C. Tubb (4 stars)-This was pretty cool. I liked how a time machine (in ring form) comes out to play with an airplane. Don't want to spoil since the ending was so good. I would have loved to see this in a Twilight Zone episode. "The Fifth Category" by Tom Bissell (1 star)-This whole thing seems to be a story about how torture is wrong and terribly and seems to be a long winded diatribe against the previous two Administrations. I don't know, it made zero sense to decide to go to such lengths against a man who wrote memos regarding acceptable forms of torture. Especially since these people murdered someone and I don't think you can claim the moral high ground there if you are using someone's life to make some random point. I was so annoyed when I finished this story I set this anthology aside for a few hours. "Two Minutes Forty-Five Seconds" by Dan Simmons (3 stars)-Everything looked pretty good until the ending. Once again it felt like a story which made no sense to me. Let's murder everyone on the plane to really take out these terrible human beings who you believe are the cause of others death. Why do I keep looking for logic in horror stories? "Diablitos" by Cory Goodfellow (1 star)-Evil possessed mask plus a plane ride. I was bored. Sorry. I was hoping for something more. "Air Raid" by John Varley (3 stars)-Interesting, I wish that there had been more detail in this one. It felt like Varley was more focused on the twisty ending than anything else. "You are Released" by Joe Hill (5 stars)-Look, I get that King edited this and couldn't make it the first story here, but he should have. Next to Matheson's work this is among the best in this collection. I loved it. Hill seems to be taking real life things (Trump threatening nuclear war against North Korea) and showing what could happen if the world imploded while on a plane. I felt like this was a nice little send up to The Langoliers too. "Warbirds" by David J. Schow (2 stars)-Way too technical for me and just boring honestly. "The Flying Machine" by Ray Bradbury (1 star)-....no. That's all I got at this point. I also at this point started sneak reading another book. "Zombies on a Plane" by Bev Vincent (4 stars)-It was an interesting idea and I loved the callback to the Snakes on a Plane movie. It just needed a bit more oomph for me. I loved the idea of a zombie virus taking everyone as soon as you die, so you don't need to be bit to change. I think The Walking Dead has that same premise too right? Or it did. I don't know, I stopped watching that show this year because I got sick of it. "They Shall Not Grow Old' By Richard Dahl (3 stars)-This story actually felt a little long and I lost interest in it half way through. "Murder in the Air" by Peter Tremayne (5 stars)-A locked room murder mystery on a plane. Heck King even points out it's a double locked room murder mystery if you count the plane as being locked too. I loved it. That is all. "The Turbulence Expert" by Stephen King (5 stars)- I liked the why behind this story. It also echoes some Richard Bachman in my eyes too. "Falling" by James Dickey (1 stars)-It's a very long poem. My eyes glazed over two pages in unfortunately.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Kimberly

    FLIGHT OR FRIGHT, edited by Stephen King and Bev Vincent (who also each contributed a story of their own), is an anthology of plane-horror stories. While I would say that most of these stories were above average, the only thing that disappointed me was that I had already read the majority of them before--some of them several times. Here you'll find classic reprints from Richard Matheson and Ambrose Bierce, to newer tales from Joe Hill and Cody Goodfellow. A solid collection from older flying mach FLIGHT OR FRIGHT, edited by Stephen King and Bev Vincent (who also each contributed a story of their own), is an anthology of plane-horror stories. While I would say that most of these stories were above average, the only thing that disappointed me was that I had already read the majority of them before--some of them several times. Here you'll find classic reprints from Richard Matheson and Ambrose Bierce, to newer tales from Joe Hill and Cody Goodfellow. A solid collection from older flying machines to the newer jets, these 17 short stories will likely have something for every horror fan to enjoy. However, if you're a voracious reader, chances are good that you've read at least some of these contributions before.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Bark

    I listened to the unabridged audiobook. I have to thank my library and Overdrive for saving me some cash, especially since too many of the stories here were a little meh for my liking. This anthology features stories about the fear of flying and the terrible things the imagination and reality can cook up to speed up your demise. If you’re afraid of flying, this book isn’t going to help you out with that. There are coffins in the back and monsters on the wing! I’m not going to go into the details o I listened to the unabridged audiobook. I have to thank my library and Overdrive for saving me some cash, especially since too many of the stories here were a little meh for my liking. This anthology features stories about the fear of flying and the terrible things the imagination and reality can cook up to speed up your demise. If you’re afraid of flying, this book isn’t going to help you out with that. There are coffins in the back and monsters on the wing! I’m not going to go into the details of every story because I will lose the will to live and if you want to read this there is no point in me ruining it for you. I didn’t take notes because sometimes you just want to listen to a book without turning it into a homework assignment. Sorry. Sometimes you get a real review from me, other times you get this. There’s a decent mix here of old decrepit stories and newer ones. Many of them I had read already read so, yeah, glad I didn’t spend money on this. All of the writers are males because women aren’t afraid of flying, I guess. We are built of sterner stuff, lol. Anyhow, the results are mixed. Stephen King writes a kick butt introduction, as always and his story here is one of the better ones. I only wish it had been a wee bit longer because I’m greedy. Still, that man knows how to write a short story. Now on to (some of) the others. CARGO starts things off and it is a good creeping dread tale but was so based in reality that it was more sad than scary for me, especially having just seen the Jonestown documentary. Then there’s NIGHTMARE AT 20,000 FEET. You know that story made famous by Captain Kirk and that creepy-ass Twilight Zone episode? Yep, this is the source material and, because I was a creepy kid, I watched it a million times growing up so I knew how it all went down. One of the stories here had tentacles but don’t ask me which one because my brain is full. The tentacles were a nice little bonus in an otherwise bland story. Joe Hill’s contribution was a frightening read because, well, it could happen! It could happen any damned, cursed moment. You’ll know what I mean when you read it and especially if you live in the USA. There’s a tale about a dude who finds a time travelling ring and can’t keep his murderous hands to himself. He totally gets what is coming to him and what’s coming to him isn’t pleasant! I think I enjoyed DIABLITOS the most. It’s a sinister little tale about a guy who steals something from the wrong lady. The ending completely caught me off guard and created an image in my head that still lingers. Loved it. I also thought AIR RAID was fantastic and nailed the whole Twilight Zone vibe. MURDER IN THE AIR was a decent little murder mystery but not at all a horror story. The problem with this collection is that many of the stories weren’t all that interesting to me personally. There are so very many boring war time stories and those don’t do it for me. Most are incredibly depressing or about guys agonizing about imminent death and I didn’t find them very gripping. In fact, my thoughts while listening to many of these stories wasn’t one of sympathy but more along the lines of “stop your whining and embrace your fate”. But I’m a jerk like that.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Dawn

    mmm, not sure what to say about this one. I just presumed I would love it, but as we all know, going in with high expectations is usually a death knell. Plus I've recently read a couple of great King short story collections so the bar was set very high. My reasons for having these high expectations were: I love SK in general, I relish unusual stories in particular and, I work in aviation - it seemed a foregone conclusion. But, nope. Well perhaps I am being a bit harsh - I did like quite a few of the mmm, not sure what to say about this one. I just presumed I would love it, but as we all know, going in with high expectations is usually a death knell. Plus I've recently read a couple of great King short story collections so the bar was set very high. My reasons for having these high expectations were: I love SK in general, I relish unusual stories in particular and, I work in aviation - it seemed a foregone conclusion. But, nope. Well perhaps I am being a bit harsh - I did like quite a few of them, but a couple I found simply tedious, no other word for it. In fact I didn't even read one of the stories (Warbirds) - I started it, felt myself glazing over and thought 'I'll come back to that one at the end'. But I never did. Perhaps this was a mistake, and someone will tell me they thought that particular one was the best story in the collection! (unlikely 😉) When I looked back, I liked more stories than I disliked so I started asking myself, 'why the pervading feeling of disappointment?' And came up with this reasoning: It seemed a very 'male' book to me. I know that's not a very PC thing to say, but I don't know how else to put it. The stories were all written by men - but it wasn't just that, plenty of books I read are by men. It had the feel of one of those 'adventure stories for boys' books that were kicking around when I was a kid. I suppose that's because a few of the stories are vintage, and aircraft - especially wartime aircraft/aviation - was predominantly a male environment in days gone by. There were a couple of stories with political references too, which I never seem to enjoy. Plus, because I deal with aircraft every day perhaps it was just a case of subject overload for me. I think if I'd have scattered the stories inbetween other reads I would have enjoyed it more. After all no-one wants to think about work when they're not there do they? (well I don't anyway). I did enjoy Stephen King's introduction, along with his few words before each story - I can never get enough of him talking to us directly (being a constant reader). If you liked the 'adventures for boys' style, and you love aircraft, then this one may be for you - sadly I'm just not the target audience this time. So, I'm glad I borrowed this from the library instead of buying my own copy. I'm looking forward to SK's next offering 'Elevation' in a few weeks though, which I've ordered in advance - let's hope my high expectations don't ruin that one for me too... (unlikely 😉)

  9. 4 out of 5

    Сибин Майналовски

    Красота! Няма такава красота! Е, има и едно-две недоразумения (какво, в името на пресветата Дева, е „Летящата машина“ на Амброуз Биърс и кой дебил е решил да го включи в тази перла???? А за пишман-поемата в края не ми хрумва нищо, освен нецензурни думи...), но като цяло книгата мачка! Стивън Кинг, естествено, е на върха, но Джо Хил, Едуин Ч. Тъб, Дан Симънс (няма такъв майндфак, честно!), Дейвид Дж. Шоу (романтика!), Роалд Дал (просълзи ме...)... Препоръчвам горещо! Задължително четиво за всички Красота! Няма такава красота! Е, има и едно-две недоразумения (какво, в името на пресветата Дева, е „Летящата машина“ на Амброуз Биърс и кой дебил е решил да го включи в тази перла???? А за пишман-поемата в края не ми хрумва нищо, освен нецензурни думи...), но като цяло книгата мачка! Стивън Кинг, естествено, е на върха, но Джо Хил, Едуин Ч. Тъб, Дан Симънс (няма такъв майндфак, честно!), Дейвид Дж. Шоу (романтика!), Роалд Дал (просълзи ме...)... Препоръчвам горещо! Задължително четиво за всички... 🌞

  10. 4 out of 5

    Bill Lynas

    Stephen King has spent his life frightening his readers, but what scares the world's best selling horror writer ? Flying it seems. So here, appropriatley, is a collection of short stories set around the world of flight. It's a mixed bag of quality, but there are some real gems to be found here. Richard Matheson's Nightmare At 20,000 Feet has always been a favourite story of mine, as has the classic Twilight Zone episode it inspired. Arthur Conan Doyle's The Horror Of The Heights is a wonderful ta Stephen King has spent his life frightening his readers, but what scares the world's best selling horror writer ? Flying it seems. So here, appropriatley, is a collection of short stories set around the world of flight. It's a mixed bag of quality, but there are some real gems to be found here. Richard Matheson's Nightmare At 20,000 Feet has always been a favourite story of mine, as has the classic Twilight Zone episode it inspired. Arthur Conan Doyle's The Horror Of The Heights is a wonderful tale, all the more so when you realise it was written way back in 1913. Almost all the tales here are new to me, & the editors have put together an eclectic group of authors who supply a very entertaining series of stories for horror lovers everywhere.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Marc-Antoine

    I enjoyed this a lot. As in other anthologies some of the stories were great, some not as much but overall a solid lineup. I was sold as soon as I knew that King and Hill and new stories in it. They did not disappoint.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Amanda NEVER MANDY

    Once upon a time in a faraway decade there existed short story collections that would knock your socks off. If the book contained fourteen stories then at least eight of them would be considered decent and four of them would send you on a mission to find better fitting socks. Then one day the world got greedy and it was decided that everything was worth publishing and quantity became more valuable than quality. Readers found themselves beginning to doubt the authors they once trusted, not unders Once upon a time in a faraway decade there existed short story collections that would knock your socks off. If the book contained fourteen stories then at least eight of them would be considered decent and four of them would send you on a mission to find better fitting socks. Then one day the world got greedy and it was decided that everything was worth publishing and quantity became more valuable than quality. Readers found themselves beginning to doubt the authors they once trusted, not understanding how they could release amazing novels AND crap short stories at the same time. Leaving them to wonder, is the author to blame for agreeing to do it or is the publisher to blame for requesting and/or allowing it to be released? It’s pretty obvious that I was not a fan of this book. I have decided to rate each individual story instead of my usual paragraph or two summarizing my overall feelings. It’s Wednesday and I’m feeling froggy: 1) “Cargo” by E. Michael Lewis (** A real life is scarier than fiction kind of story that doesn’t contain enough.) 2) “The Horror of the Heights” by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle (* Extremely boring.) 3) “Nightmare at 20,000 Feet” by Richard Matheson (**** I didn’t love it as much as the movie version but it did educate me on the origin of the story.) 4) “The Flying Machine” by Ambrose Bierce (* I don’t remember what this one was about.) 5) “Lucifer!” by E.C. Tubb (*** Interesting premise but it didn’t entertain me enough.) 6) “The Fifth Category” by Tom Bissell (* I don’t remember what this one was about.) 7) “Two Minutes Forty-Five Seconds” by Dan Simmons (* Confusing until the end and it wasn’t exciting enough for me to care.) 8) “Diablitos” by Cody Goodfellow (* I don’t remember what this one was about.) 9) “Air Raid” by John Varley (* I don’t remember what this one was about.) 10) “You Are Released” by Joe Hill (***** The most terrifying story in the book. I loved this one.) 11) “Warbirds” by David J. Schow (** I remember this one which is worth one star but the story was weak.) 12) “The Flying Machine” by Ray Bradbury (* Not entertaining.) 13) “Zombies” on a Plane by Bev Vincent (*** Interesting premise but it didn’t entertain me enough.) 14) “They Shall Not Grow Old” by Roald Dahl (*** Interesting premise but it didn’t entertain me enough.) 15) “Murder in the Air” by Peter Tremayne (*** Interesting premise but the length of the story killed the mystery buildup.) 16) “The Turbulence Expert” by Stephen King (*** Interesting premise but it needs more bang for my buck.) 17) “Falling” by James Dickey (* Poetry is not my jam and this one was very not my jam.) Two stars to a book that really only entertained me 2 out of 17 times.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Scott S.

    Flight or Fright is an assortment of flying-related horror / suspense / sci-fi short stories - and also one protracted poem - that never quite took off for me. < groan > Anyway, there were a few very good if not excellent selections that notably came from two different time periods -- the classics Nightmare at 20.000 Feet by Richard Matheson and The Flying Machine by Ray Bradbury (both masters at the short story format in the 50's and 60's) along with the more recent The Turbulence Expert Flight or Fright is an assortment of flying-related horror / suspense / sci-fi short stories - and also one protracted poem - that never quite took off for me. < groan > Anyway, there were a few very good if not excellent selections that notably came from two different time periods -- the classics Nightmare at 20.000 Feet by Richard Matheson and The Flying Machine by Ray Bradbury (both masters at the short story format in the 50's and 60's) along with the more recent The Turbulence Expert by Stephen King and You Are Released by Joe Hill (King's son, BTW). However, that still leaves the other 3/4 of the book, and those tales often just okay and/or did not make much of a lasting impression.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Dez Nemec

    I am not a good flier. I flew to FL for spring break a few months after 9/11, and there were armed guardsman all over our tiny airport. Ever since then, I get a sick feeling in the pit of my stomach starting the night before we leave that doesn’t abate until after we land. Yes, I know it’s safer than driving. Yes, I know that there is an infinitesimal chance of something going wrong. No, I don’t care. I’m not unhappy in the least that I haven’t been on a plane in over 3 years. Needless to say, th I am not a good flier. I flew to FL for spring break a few months after 9/11, and there were armed guardsman all over our tiny airport. Ever since then, I get a sick feeling in the pit of my stomach starting the night before we leave that doesn’t abate until after we land. Yes, I know it’s safer than driving. Yes, I know that there is an infinitesimal chance of something going wrong. No, I don’t care. I’m not unhappy in the least that I haven’t been on a plane in over 3 years. Needless to say, these stories appealed to all my flying insecurities. This is absolutely one of the best anthologies I have read in awhile. I was stoked to see Matheson’s “Nightmare at 20,00 Feet” in the table of contents. I don’t think a book about the horrors of flying would be complete without it. While I don’t recall reading anything by E.C. Tubb before, I thought that “Lucifer!” was a great tale about both time travel and the horror of flying. “Zombies on a Plane” by Bev Vincent is a rather cautionary tale about the desperate fight for survival and running away from your problems. And even though “Murder in the Air” was more mystery than horror (although having to solve a mysterious death in the air is a horror in itself), it was quite clever. Coincidentally, my last flight was to see King in Toronto, so perhaps there is some bias, but I really enjoyed his new one. “The Turbulence Expert” has a truly unique premise – imagine if there was someone on the plane to help keep the flight safe that wasn’t an Air Marshal… I finally had the opportunity to go to a Joe Hill reading a few months ago, and I had heard an abridged version of “You Are Released.” A terrifying story of what if, made more terrifying because it occurs to the passengers while en route across the country. It definitely did nothing for my flying insecurities! This is a truly unique collection that touches the many horrors of air travel. A wonderful collection of great authors and remarkable stories. 4 1/2 stars.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Leo Robertson

    Yeugh—some good stories but they're the minority here. Did y'all know it was Stephen King's 71st birthday recently? I almost avoided finding out because I muted his name and @StephenKing on Twitter. (But not on Facebook! Damn you, gushing horror friends! Legend has it that if you say his name three times in quick succession... you're in the minority.) I'm an expert Twitter muter—though there is one conundrum I have not yet solved: I've muted "word count", but that's not enough, but I can hardly m Yeugh—some good stories but they're the minority here. Did y'all know it was Stephen King's 71st birthday recently? I almost avoided finding out because I muted his name and @StephenKing on Twitter. (But not on Facebook! Damn you, gushing horror friends! Legend has it that if you say his name three times in quick succession... you're in the minority.) I'm an expert Twitter muter—though there is one conundrum I have not yet solved: I've muted "word count", but that's not enough, but I can hardly mute "words" and every number... Anyway, of everyone I know I both fly and hate flying the most. I have the highest flight:flight-enjoyment ratio around. So isn't this book designed for me? And this isn't one of King's books, right? This is just a book he EDITED. With stories from, uh, HIM, his son, a guy who writes companion guides to Stephen King books, uhhhhhhh... A free copy of this book was gratefully provided to me by me for saving up enough points at Outland in Oslo. (To be fair, King's opening essay about his diminishing fear of flying over the years actually calmed me down about flying. So, mission achieved!)

  16. 5 out of 5

    Lou

    From passengers and cargo, to unexpected and unwanted visitors on a plane, to Zombies or a Gremlin, and a plane flying through something comparable to The Stand setting, all the mystery, terror, and the supernatural at 20000 feet to 34000 feet and decreasing. There is splendid reading awaiting, some tales thrilling and have you hooked in with great anticipation of what will happen next. Holidays over for most, all flying one needs to do could be over, good timing for reading these tales before the From passengers and cargo, to unexpected and unwanted visitors on a plane, to Zombies or a Gremlin, and a plane flying through something comparable to The Stand setting, all the mystery, terror, and the supernatural at 20000 feet to 34000 feet and decreasing. There is splendid reading awaiting, some tales thrilling and have you hooked in with great anticipation of what will happen next. Holidays over for most, all flying one needs to do could be over, good timing for reading these tales before the next flight out and months away from any newly founded anxieties left, due to some tales staying with the reader long after shelving this book. This anthology is a great opportunity to read two great classic chilling tales, one may had never read, from Sir Arthur Conan Doyle and Richard Matheson. Within, there are plenty new authors to read of and enjoy, seek out and take further and have under your reading radar and there is new material to submerge oneself in from two well seasoned short story writers, Stephen King and Joe Hill. Some excerpts @ https://more2read.com/review/flight-or-fright-edited-by-stephen-king-and-bev-vincent/

  17. 5 out of 5

    Lars (theatretenor) Skaar

    Did love this one! Some of the stories were a little “eh” but a lot of them were really good. Especially in the second half of the book! No surprise but Joe Hill, Roald Dahl, Stephen King, and Bev Vincent were fantastic! With a special nod to Peter Tremayne who I had heard of before but loved his locked room murder mystery on a plane!

  18. 5 out of 5

    Димитър Цолов

    В началото на набързо стъкменото си ревю искам да изкажа адмирации за смелостта на Pleiad Publishers, които започнаха да ни радват с хорър сборници и скоро след "Сияние в мрака" бял свят на български видя нова читава жанрова селекция. При това с корица, която май ме кефи повече от оригиналната и подобно на предната антология пусната в два варианта - по-евтин и по-луксозен (ха познайте с кой се сдобих!). Сега по няколко думи за "турбулентните" творби, подбрани от чичо Стив и Бев Винсънт. Товар / Е В началото на набързо стъкменото си ревю искам да изкажа адмирации за смелостта на Pleiad Publishers, които започнаха да ни радват с хорър сборници и скоро след "Сияние в мрака" бял свят на български видя нова читава жанрова селекция. При това с корица, която май ме кефи повече от оригиналната и подобно на предната антология пусната в два варианта - по-евтин и по-луксозен (ха познайте с кой се сдобих!). Сега по няколко думи за "турбулентните" творби, подбрани от чичо Стив и Бев Винсънт. Товар / Ерик Майкъл Луис Много, много добър откриващ разказ, базиран на реални събития и изповядващ личната ми философия, че няма по-брутален хорър автор от самия живот. На 19 ноември 1978 г. 914 души, сред които и 200 деца, загиват в джунглата на Гвиана, след като поглъщат цианкалий. Това е най-голямото масово самоубийство, което историята на човечеството познава. Жертвите са последователи на сектата "Храм на народите", подтикнати да сложат край на живота си от нейния водач пастор Джим Джоунс. Товарът, чието пренасяне организира сержант Дейвис на "С-141 Старлифтър", най-големият транспортен самолет на Военновъздушното командване, е меко казано потресаващ. Сграбчваща гърлото история с щипка хорър за разкош. Ужас във висините / Сър Артър Конан Дойл Излязъл през 1913, само десет години след полета на братята Райт, заглавният разказ е доста наивен от съвременна гледна точка, но пък бащицата на Шерлок Холмс винаги е умеел да пише увлекателно. Кошмари на 7000 метра височина / Ричард Матисън През 1961, когато се пръква тази история, пътниците не само могат да пушат на борда на самолета, но и спокойно да пъхнат пистолет в ръчния си багаж. Яко нали, ха-ха, а сега добавете и едно свръхестествено същество, нехайно разхождащо се по крилото на самолета... Читав разказ, но толкова - не ме впечатли особено. Летящата машина / Амброуз Биърс Хм, зад това заглавие се крият точно три абзаца текст, които спокойно можеха да не фигурират в антологията. Луцифер! / Едуин Ч. Тъб Майсторско изпълнение, обединяващо екстремен самолетен полет и тайм фантастика. Петата категория / Том Бисъл Качествен политически трилър, основаващ се на реална фактология - разсекретените доклади за разпитите на затворници в Гуантанамо, които нямат статут на военнопленници и съответно не се ползват с протекцията на Женевската конвенция. Две минути и четирийсет и пет секунди / Дан Симънс Експерт по кумулативни бойни глави и ракетни двигатели, измъчван от угризения на съвестта... Прилична история, но толкова - не ме впечатли особено. Диаблитос / Коуди Гудфелоу Трафикант на артефакти пътува от Коста Рика към Щатите, предвкусвайки добра печалба. Да, ама маската в раницата му има собствени планове. Читав разказ. Въздушно нападение / Джон Варли Излязъл през 1977 и номиниран за "Хюго" и "Небюла", разказът ми хареса доволно. Качествена твърда фантастика. Имате разрешение / Джо Хил Един от фаворитите ми в сборника. Фен съм на синковеца на Кинг след "Кутия с форма на сърце", "Рога" и "Пожарникаря", оказа се, че го бива и в кратките форми. Напоследък уж наблюдаваме някакво размразяване в отношенията между Северна Корея и Америка, да, ама не и в този разказ. Бойни птици / Дейвид Дж. Шоу Разказ за Втората световна война, който не успя да ме впечатли особено. Все пак научих, че авторът е измислил термина "сплатърпънк" (splatterpunk), публикуван в Оксфордския речник на английския език през 2002... и това е нещо, ха-ха. Летящата машина / Рей Бредбъри Още една "летяща машина", но за разлика от Биърсовото недоносче - типичен Бредбъри - разказ - поетичен стил, философски прозрения и любопитен сетинг - Китай, 400 г. пр. Хр. Зомбита в самолета / Бев Винсънт Зомби апокалипсисът, както обикновено се е състоял, а неколцина души се опитват да се измъкнат от "акитата" с малък чартърен самолет. Кратка история - харесах. Те няма да остареят / Роалд Дал Разказ за Втората световна война, който успя да ме впечатли. Един от фаворитите ми в сборника. Убийство във въздуха / Питър Тримейн Читава кримка, експлоатираща "мистерията в заключената стая". И това че авторът още от самото начало те ориентира кой е убиецът по никакъв начин не намалява удоволствието от обосновката на "доказателствения материал". Есперт по турбулентност / Стивън Кинг Краля си е Крал и го доказва за пореден път в петнайсетина страници. Падане / Джеймс Л. Дики Очите ми пробягаха по тази, кхъ-кхъ, поема, любима на Стивън Кинг, както се разбира от предговора и следговора, но не успяла да ме спечели... Все пак си припомних случая с Весна Вулович, стюардесата оцеляла след падане от 10 000 м. височина... и това е нещо, ха-ха. Крайна оценка 4,5

  19. 5 out of 5

    Jason

    Fave stories: Cargo by E. Michael Lewis Nightmare at 20,000 Feet by Richard Matheson Lucifer! by E.C. Tubb You Are Released by Joe Hill Zombies on a Plane by Bev Vincent The Turbulence Expert by Stephen King Particular shout-out to Joe Hill for You Are Released - that story gave me genuine anxiety...

  20. 5 out of 5

    Alan

    After having been somewhat disappointed in recently read anthologies, I was pleased to find this one to be quite good. It's really been some time since I've read a collection like this where all but one or two were not just perfectly fitting of the theme, but were all pretty enjoyable. And Stephen King was correct when he said the most terrifying tale of all those in the book was by Joe Hill.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Elaine

    Reading a short story compilation always reminds me of the good ol' days when I used to buy old timey fun timey CDs from my favorite band. I disliked shelling out $15 bucks because there was a good chance I would only like 3 songs out of 12; if I was really lucky, I liked half. The same feelings apply to Flight or Fright. The stories were a mixed bag, the only ones I liked were from the King of Horror himself, his son and Richard Matheson's classic Nightmare at 30,000 feet. I've never read the s Reading a short story compilation always reminds me of the good ol' days when I used to buy old timey fun timey CDs from my favorite band. I disliked shelling out $15 bucks because there was a good chance I would only like 3 songs out of 12; if I was really lucky, I liked half. The same feelings apply to Flight or Fright. The stories were a mixed bag, the only ones I liked were from the King of Horror himself, his son and Richard Matheson's classic Nightmare at 30,000 feet. I've never read the short story until now though I've seen the Twilight Zone episode plenty of times and I couldn't help picturing a very young William Shatner as I was reading. A couple others I didn't hate include Diablitos and Zombies on a Plane because, well, I like zombies. The rest were too war heavy, politics heavy and war and politics heavy. Boooo! Also, where are all the female contributors? Not even one??? Women can write horror and scary stories on a plane, too.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Chris DiLeo

    A wonderful collection of creepy, thrilling, fascinating stories. If like me, you already find flying a precarious challenge, these stories are ready-made for you. They will get your heart racing, and you will be soon flipping pages rapidly, hoping for a smooth landing. The best pieces are "Cargo"; "Nightmare at 20,000 Feet"; "Two Minutes Forty-Five Seconds"; "You Are Released"; "The Turbulence Expert" and "Falling."

  23. 4 out of 5

    Andre

    An excellent and highly entertaining collection of short fiction revolving around airplanes. King's contribution doesn't quite live up to what we are expecting from him, but otherwise very good. Highly recommended.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Ciri

    My favorite part about starting anything with King's name on it is his introductions. It's impossible not to be sucked into his world and feel that he is talking to and reading with you. I was excited from the start, and the first story in this collection did not disappoint. I was especially impressed by Hill's short story You Are Released. This story had the feel of a full length novel and I was disappointed it wasnt. It was the first work by Joe Hill that I've read and I plan to go purchase mo My favorite part about starting anything with King's name on it is his introductions. It's impossible not to be sucked into his world and feel that he is talking to and reading with you. I was excited from the start, and the first story in this collection did not disappoint. I was especially impressed by Hill's short story You Are Released. This story had the feel of a full length novel and I was disappointed it wasnt. It was the first work by Joe Hill that I've read and I plan to go purchase more of his stuff. Overall, I loved these stories Edited to add: I re-read Vincent's short story because... zombies on a plane. Why else? And my favorite line is "He wonders whether zombies feel pain". All i can say is....OH MY GOD. Ive thought about this line more than i want to admit. Bev Vincent, if you ever find out the answer to Myles' thought please tell me.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Mike Duguid

    Hills was the stand out for me, classic short story

  26. 4 out of 5

    Scott

    Zombies on a Plane! Yes!

  27. 5 out of 5

    Joey B.

    A random hodgepodge of hit or miss stories spanning 100+ years of storytelling.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Alex Bear

    The one by Joe Hill was the star of the collection. Cargo by E Michael Lewis at the beginning wasn't a bad hook, but everything else didn't really...take off.

  29. 5 out of 5

    ClubStephenKing

    The stories are very different, but this is a very good anthology ! They range from very scary ("Cargo" & "Diablitos" ) to some more realistic (but therefore more scary) stories like the one from Joe Hill (my favorite), and some other occurring in different time and places (eg, the ancient China). Overall, it was a very good anthology, and I like the tone that Bev Vincent has put into his afterword. Furthermore, but not the least interesting, this is definitely a mandatory reading for any Steph The stories are very different, but this is a very good anthology ! They range from very scary ("Cargo" & "Diablitos" ) to some more realistic (but therefore more scary) stories like the one from Joe Hill (my favorite), and some other occurring in different time and places (eg, the ancient China). Overall, it was a very good anthology, and I like the tone that Bev Vincent has put into his afterword. Furthermore, but not the least interesting, this is definitely a mandatory reading for any Stephen King fans since he wrote : an introduction in which he tells us his worst experience in a (private) plane, a brand new story "The Turbulence Expert" that will resonate to every passenger, and introducting notes to every single story! I am sort of glad that the publishers released this book AFTER the holidays, but I believe that next time that I will be flying, I will not be able but thinking about what could go wrong.... Thanks for ruining my next flight ! PS : full (french) article about the book, with a short synopsis of every single stories > https://club-stephenking.fr/sortie-fl... PS 2 : the book is available from Cemetery Dance (USA) & Hodder & Stoughton (UK and other english territories)

  30. 5 out of 5

    James

    3.5

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