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The Poetry of Pablo Neruda

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The most comprehensive English-language collection of work ever by "the greatest poet of the twentieth century - in any language" - Gabriel García Márquez "In his work a continent awakens to consciousness." So wrote the Swedish Academy in awarding the Nobel Prize to Pablo Neruda, the author of more than thirty-five books of poetry and one of Latin America's most revered wri The most comprehensive English-language collection of work ever by "the greatest poet of the twentieth century - in any language" - Gabriel García Márquez "In his work a continent awakens to consciousness." So wrote the Swedish Academy in awarding the Nobel Prize to Pablo Neruda, the author of more than thirty-five books of poetry and one of Latin America's most revered writers, lionized during his lifetime as "the people's poet." This selection of Neruda's poetry, the most comprehensive single volume available in English, presents nearly six hundred poems, scores of them in new and sometimes multiple translations, and many accompanied by the Spanish original. In his introduction, Ilan Stavans situates Neruda in his native milieu as well as in a contemporary English-language one, and a group of new translations by leading poets testifies to Neruda's enduring, vibrant legacy among English-speaking writers and readers today.


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The most comprehensive English-language collection of work ever by "the greatest poet of the twentieth century - in any language" - Gabriel García Márquez "In his work a continent awakens to consciousness." So wrote the Swedish Academy in awarding the Nobel Prize to Pablo Neruda, the author of more than thirty-five books of poetry and one of Latin America's most revered wri The most comprehensive English-language collection of work ever by "the greatest poet of the twentieth century - in any language" - Gabriel García Márquez "In his work a continent awakens to consciousness." So wrote the Swedish Academy in awarding the Nobel Prize to Pablo Neruda, the author of more than thirty-five books of poetry and one of Latin America's most revered writers, lionized during his lifetime as "the people's poet." This selection of Neruda's poetry, the most comprehensive single volume available in English, presents nearly six hundred poems, scores of them in new and sometimes multiple translations, and many accompanied by the Spanish original. In his introduction, Ilan Stavans situates Neruda in his native milieu as well as in a contemporary English-language one, and a group of new translations by leading poets testifies to Neruda's enduring, vibrant legacy among English-speaking writers and readers today.

30 review for The Poetry of Pablo Neruda

  1. 5 out of 5

    Ian "Marvin" Graye

    Pending a review Ute Lemper One of my favourite singers has just released an album of songs she created from 12 of Pablo Neruda poems. It's called "Forever": http://www.utelemper.com/neruda/ The Flight from Weimar to Chile [Ute Lemper, Live at the Concert Hall, QPAC, Brisbane, Friday, September 13, 2013] His legacy is An ocean of Probabilities, Made likely By the flow Of verse From its source, His mind, To a remote Destination Across the world, Us, the audience He had in mind, Focussed and Inexorable. You, Ute, Hov Pending a review Ute Lemper One of my favourite singers has just released an album of songs she created from 12 of Pablo Neruda poems. It's called "Forever": http://www.utelemper.com/neruda/ The Flight from Weimar to Chile [Ute Lemper, Live at the Concert Hall, QPAC, Brisbane, Friday, September 13, 2013] His legacy is An ocean of Probabilities, Made likely By the flow Of verse From its source, His mind, To a remote Destination Across the world, Us, the audience He had in mind, Focussed and Inexorable. You, Ute, Hovered Bird-like in Some crazy, Jazz Birdland, Scatting, Above the water, Swooping And squawking And growling And soaring Like a flight Of sea-birds Over timeless Slow moving Estuaries. One by one, You singled out The crafted Sensations Of his rhyme, Like gulls plunging on Chips left behind In the beach sand. You mimicked Miles’ trumpet With your voice, Deftly painting Sketches of Spain And Chile In Spanish, French, Even Anglaise. At first, coy, You held hands With Neruda, Until later, No longer the Sophisticated tease, You gave yourself To this man Of simple ways, Then both of you Took off Like swallows On the breeze. You discovered His thoughts, His words, his love, His passionate Intensity In a tiny book That's now Well-fingered. Then you added your own Unique voice, your arms Your legs, your body And your love, So that in turn You might be loved And you were And still, my heart, Again, you are. My Favourite Modern Lover [Apologies to Jonathan Richman] Just a sketch, some paint, a glaze Were all Picasso needed To capture pretty women, Some were even in the nude. Although he was very short, Girls could not resist his gaze. Then came Pablo Neruda. He wrote lots of poetry. He learned how to flirt with verse, Now women who read it swoon. Though he's my favoured Pablo, I still can't tell who's ruder. Gratitude Thank you, Fate, For guiding me To my love. The entanglement Of limbs And flesh Is a pleasure Great, but small Compared with When our Hearts and minds Enmesh. I'm in Love with a German Film Star [I Crave Your Lips, Your Eyes, Your Avatar] Next time you're in bed I'd like to hold you In my loving arms, Kiss you on the lips, Run my hand over Your curvaceous hips, Gently part your legs, Entreat your dew drops And take a few sips, Until you wanted To be entered as If we had been wed.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Kelly

    "And because love battles not only in its burning agricultures but also in the mouth of men and women, I will finish off by taking the path away to those who between my chest and your fragrance want to interpose their obscure plant. About me, nothing worse they will tell you, my love, than what I told you. I lived in the prairies before I got to know you and I did not wait love but I was laying in wait for and I jumped on the rose. What more can they tell you? I am neither good nor bad but a man, and they wil "And because love battles not only in its burning agricultures but also in the mouth of men and women, I will finish off by taking the path away to those who between my chest and your fragrance want to interpose their obscure plant. About me, nothing worse they will tell you, my love, than what I told you. I lived in the prairies before I got to know you and I did not wait love but I was laying in wait for and I jumped on the rose. What more can they tell you? I am neither good nor bad but a man, and they will then associate the danger of my life, which you know and which with your passion you shared. And good, this danger is danger of love, of complete love for all life, for all lives, and if this love brings us the death and the prisons, I am sure that your big eyes, as when I kiss them, will then close with pride, into double pride, love, with your pride and my pride. But to my ears they will come before to wear down the tour of the sweet and hard love which binds us, and they will say: “The one you love, is not a woman for you, Why do you love her? I think you could find one more beautiful, more serious, more deep, more other, you understand me, look how she’s light, and what a head she has, and look at how she dresses, and etcetera and etcetera”. And I in these lines say: Like this I want you, love, love, Like this I love you, as you dress and how your hair lifts up and how your mouth smiles, light as the water of the spring upon the pure stones, Like this I love you, beloved..." -Pablo Neruda

  3. 5 out of 5

    ⊱ Poppy ⊰

    I Liked Pablo Neruda's writing, I believe his raw passion speaks to all of us on a universal level. It's so human and bare, it is his monument left to us. This is an amazing collection which begins with his early work to his retrospective years, it shows you this amazing evolution of his writing and how powerful it becomes. Some poems really hit home where some of them really confused me. These poems really made this book a quite interesting read for me. And I in these lines say: Like this I want I Liked Pablo Neruda's writing, I believe his raw passion speaks to all of us on a universal level. It's so human and bare, it is his monument left to us. This is an amazing collection which begins with his early work to his retrospective years, it shows you this amazing evolution of his writing and how powerful it becomes. Some poems really hit home where some of them really confused me. These poems really made this book a quite interesting read for me. And I in these lines say: Like this I want you, love, love, Like this I love you, as you dress and how your hair lifts up and how your mouth smiles, light as the water of the spring upon the pure stones, Like this I love you, beloved..." -Pablo Neruda I no longer love her, that's certain, but how I loved her. My voice tried to find the wind to touch her hearing. Another's. She will be another's. Like my kisses before. Her voice. Her bright body. Her inifinite eyes. I no longer love her, that's certain, but maybe I love her. Love is so short, forgetting is so long. Because through nights like this one I held her in my arms my soul is not satisfied that it has lost her. "I will bring you happy flowers from the mountains, bluebells, dark hazels, and rustic baskets of kisses. I want to do with you what spring does with the cherry trees." You discovered His thoughts, His words, his love, His passionate Intensity In a tiny book That's now Well-fingered. Then you added your own Unique voice, your arms Your legs, your body And your love, So that in turn You might be loved And you were And still, my heart, Again, you are. This is definitely my first book of Pablo's but not the last. I am looking forward to his writing. Highly Recommended to poetry & Classic Lovers.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Karianne

    LOVE HIM...an excerpt from my favorite poem... I no longer love her, that's certain, but how I loved her. My voice tried to find the wind to touch her hearing. Another's. She will be another's. Like my kisses before. Her voice. Her bright body. Her inifinite eyes. I no longer love her, that's certain, but maybe I love her. Love is so short, forgetting is so long. Because through nights like this one I held her in my arms my soul is not satisfied that it has lost her.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Kitty

    Neruda knew how to love a woman. There's such a sensuous, tactile quality to his poetry that makes you think he just might have been one hell of a lover. And mixed in with this earthy prose is an appreciation for the subtle, fleeting moments that last only in quick impressions and memories of wanting and desire. In one moment he tells us of the heavy weight and feel as he cups the rounded breasts of his mistress and the next he sighs his longing for the ability to devour the parts of her that li Neruda knew how to love a woman. There's such a sensuous, tactile quality to his poetry that makes you think he just might have been one hell of a lover. And mixed in with this earthy prose is an appreciation for the subtle, fleeting moments that last only in quick impressions and memories of wanting and desire. In one moment he tells us of the heavy weight and feel as he cups the rounded breasts of his mistress and the next he sighs his longing for the ability to devour the parts of her that linger in his memory whole. Truly the love poet for the modern age : I crave your mouth, your voice, your hair. Silent, starving I prowl through the streets. Bread does not nourish me, dawn disquiets me, I search the liquid sound of your steps all day. I hunger for your sleek laugh, For your hands the color of the wild grain, I hunger for the pale stones of your fingernails, I want to eat your skin like a whole almond. I want to eat the sunbeam flaring in your loveliness, The nose, sovereign of your arrogant face, I want to eat the fleeting shade of your lashes, And I walk hungry, smelling the twilight Looking for you, for your hot heart, Like a puma in the barren wilderness. One thing I will say about this particular copy though is that while it is certainly the most comprehensive edition available to English speakers, it is not, perhaps, the best translated. Kudos to the editors for managing to put it all together though - and I do believe credit is due for not sticking to one translator for the whole thing. However when comparing certain works against others it becomes apparent that not all translators do their transcribing equally. Oh well, I suppose you have to go with what's available to you at the time. Obviously not all my favorites have done every single poem and I do appreciate the effort to use the superior translation when available.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Leila

    breathtaking, heart wrenching, soul awakening -- Neruda is love ... "I do not love you as if you were salt-rose, or topaz, or the arrow of carnations the fire shoots off. I love you as certain dark things are to be loved, in secret, between the shadow and the soul. I love you as the plant that never blooms but carries in itself the light of hidden flowers; thanks to your love a certain solid fragrance, risen from the earth, lives darkly in my body. I love you without knowing how, or when, or from where. breathtaking, heart wrenching, soul awakening -- Neruda is love ... "I do not love you as if you were salt-rose, or topaz, or the arrow of carnations the fire shoots off. I love you as certain dark things are to be loved, in secret, between the shadow and the soul. I love you as the plant that never blooms but carries in itself the light of hidden flowers; thanks to your love a certain solid fragrance, risen from the earth, lives darkly in my body. I love you without knowing how, or when, or from where. I love you straightforwardly, without complexities or pride; so I love you because I know no other way than this: where I does not exist, nor you, so close that your hand on my chest is my hand, so close that your eyes close as I fall asleep."

  7. 4 out of 5

    Yasmin

    I have loved Pablo Neruda since I was fifteen years old and have fell in love with his beautiful expressions countless times. I believe his raw passion speaks to all of us on a universal level. It's so human and bare, it is his monument left to us. This is an amazing collection which begins with his early work to his retrospective years, it shows you this amazing evolution of his writing and how powerful it becomes.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Izzy G

    This book is the quintessential poetry book. Neruda is untouchable and this compilation is the best. If my house was burning and I could only run out with one book it would be a close call between this and Lorca's compilation. You could be stranded on a desert island with this book for the rest of your life and you would have a smile on your face. Y ahora, pido silencio.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Rosa Ramôa

    O Grande Oceano Se os teus dons e das tuas destruições, Oceano, as minhas mãos pudesse destinar uma medida, uma fruta, um fermento, escolheria o teu repouso distante, as linhas do teu aço, a tua extensão vigiada pelo ar e pela noite, e a energia do teu idioma branco que destroça e derruba as suas colunas na sua própria pureza demolida. Não é a última onda com o seu salgado peso a que tritura costas e produz a paz de areia que rodeia o mundo: é o central volume da força, a potência estendida das águas, a imóve O Grande Oceano Se os teus dons e das tuas destruições, Oceano, as minhas mãos pudesse destinar uma medida, uma fruta, um fermento, escolheria o teu repouso distante, as linhas do teu aço, a tua extensão vigiada pelo ar e pela noite, e a energia do teu idioma branco que destroça e derruba as suas colunas na sua própria pureza demolida. Não é a última onda com o seu salgado peso a que tritura costas e produz a paz de areia que rodeia o mundo: é o central volume da força, a potência estendida das águas, a imóvel solidão cheia de vidas. Tempo, talvez, ou taça acumulada de todo movimento, unidade pura que não selou a morte,verde víscera da totalidade abrasadora. Do braço submerso que levanta uma gota não fica senão um beijo do sal.Dos corpos do homem nas tuas margens uma húmida fragrância de flor molhada permanece. A tua energia parece resvalar sem ser gasta, parece regressar ao seu repouso. A onda que desprendes, arco de identidade, pena despedaçada, quando se despenhou foi só espuma, e regressou para nascer sem se consumir. Toda a tua força volta a ser origem. Só entregas despojos triturados, cascas que separou o teu carregamento, o que expulsou a acção da tua abundância, tudo o que deixou de ser cacho. Sua estátua é estendida além das ondas. Vivente e ordenada como o peito e o manto de um só ser e suas respirações, na matéria da luz içadas, planícies levantadas pelas ondas, formam a pele nua do planeta. Enches o teu próprio ser com a tua substância. Tornas repleta a curvatura do silêncio. Com o teu sal e o teu mel treme a taça, a cavidade universal da água, e nada falta em ti como na cratera destampada, no copo rude: cumes vazios, cicatrizes, sinais que vigiam o ar mutilado. As tuas pétalas palpitam contra o mundo, tremem os teus cereais submarinos, as suaves algas penduram a sua ameaça, navegam e pululam as escolas, e apenas sobe ao fio das redes o relâmpago morto da escama, um milímetro ferido na distância das tuas totalidades cristalinas.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Dale Harcombe

    Four and a half stars. I’m not sure how I managed to get through life to this point with only having read a couple of Pablo Neruda’s poems, so it was with great delight at a recent Lifeline book fair I picked up this single volume of his works, around 600 poems. Since I don’t read Spanish, I am reading them translated. But some also have the Spanish originals alongside them, which is interesting. As with any collection some poems appealed to me more than others. I’m not going to name them becaus Four and a half stars. I’m not sure how I managed to get through life to this point with only having read a couple of Pablo Neruda’s poems, so it was with great delight at a recent Lifeline book fair I picked up this single volume of his works, around 600 poems. Since I don’t read Spanish, I am reading them translated. But some also have the Spanish originals alongside them, which is interesting. As with any collection some poems appealed to me more than others. I’m not going to name them because I suspect that next time I pick up this book and dip into the poems those favourites, like the tide, may have changed. And this is one book of poems that I have no doubt I will return to again and again. Over all, I found the lucid writing, imagery and passion (and not just sexual passion) but passion for the land and for justice among other things drew me in. I would highly recommend this collection to anyone who does not read poetry normally as Neruda is largely an accessible poet with an eye for detail. Those who do read poetry will appreciate the skill involved in creating these poems.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Chris M.

    I'm not big on poetry. I've read the classics - Chaucer, Spenser, Shakespeare, Donne, etc. I've read the epic poems - Iliad, Odyssey, Gilgamesh. But modern era poetry usually leaves me cold--too much angst and unrequited love. However, I am always left floored by Neruda. Ode to Common Things got me into Neruda and remains one of my all time favorites. He is mostly famous for his love poems; and, while they are extraordinary, they are not IMHO his best. Neruda sees the epic and timeless connectio I'm not big on poetry. I've read the classics - Chaucer, Spenser, Shakespeare, Donne, etc. I've read the epic poems - Iliad, Odyssey, Gilgamesh. But modern era poetry usually leaves me cold--too much angst and unrequited love. However, I am always left floored by Neruda. Ode to Common Things got me into Neruda and remains one of my all time favorites. He is mostly famous for his love poems; and, while they are extraordinary, they are not IMHO his best. Neruda sees the epic and timeless connections in...well...in everything. Spoons and salt shakers are the common man's connection with history and heaven. Love and life and death are found in unexpected places. I just received this volume of his poetry which covers most of his work, some of which I've read and some which I will certainly read over and over again. I wish I was fluent in Spanish so I could read this in the original as I have no doubt something is lost in the translation. Buty what is not lost is priceless.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Mobina J

    پذیرای توام گر نمیسوزی بر دردهای من بیتوته ای کن و خود را بر بال های من سنجاق کن بال های من شاید تو را به آرزوهایم نزدیک کند تن زدن هایش شاید تن پوش درد توست، تو تنها یافته ای هستی که هستی با من از زمانی که اندوهانم را گم کردم ببوسم گازم بگیر آتشم بزن زیرا من تنها به خاطر غرق شدن چشمان نرینه ام در آب های بی نهایت چشمان مادینه ات به این سیاره پای نهاده ام

  13. 5 out of 5

    S.J. Pettersson

    "The sad wind goes on slaughtering butterflies..." The word "butterfly" is such a beautiful word in almost all the languages I know. In Spanish "mariposa", French "papillon", Danish "sommerfugl" and Swedish "fjäril". Only in Germany could they call it Schmetterling and then on top of it give the name to a fighter plane...

  14. 4 out of 5

    Snehal Bhagat

    An anthology of Pablo Neruda's poems translated into English. With over 600 poems, this is a large and fairly representative collection covering sonnets, odes, cantos and free verse drawn from across the poet's entire career. I have been reading it on and off for a fairly long time but I still have not finished reading all of it, having skimmed through some parts and skipped others altogether primarily for two reasons: the difficulty, sometimes, in establishing the context, and the problems asso An anthology of Pablo Neruda's poems translated into English. With over 600 poems, this is a large and fairly representative collection covering sonnets, odes, cantos and free verse drawn from across the poet's entire career. I have been reading it on and off for a fairly long time but I still have not finished reading all of it, having skimmed through some parts and skipped others altogether primarily for two reasons: the difficulty, sometimes, in establishing the context, and the problems associated with the language barrier. There's always this thing about poetry and the milieu in which it is written- some poems draw only on shared human experience and so need little by way of a background- as with a great deal of love poetry, while for others, the entire meaning can hinge on the reader's awareness or ignorance of its context; the former therefore tends to be more durable and has broader appeal. Neruda's love poetry is no exception - it is exquisite and extremely accessible; but I struggled with his epic poetry for I do not know enough of the context or the details of the provenance for quite a bit of it. The problem is persistent; even for a poem that purely describes nature, when we read '..and it is here that the world ends.' we can infer from the context that it is a place that is being spoken of and not a moment in time; but we do not know what place that is. Pedantic as it may seem, it matters whether the place the poet had in mind was off Cape Horn or the middle of the Atacama desert, especially because the verse is rooted so deeply in the land, its people and their traditions- often, both history and geography are intertwined to inform the narrative, so this isn't poetry that describes a continent as much as defines it: The poisonous skin of the copper, the nitrate salt spread out like a statue, crumbled and snowy: they're mine, but not only them: also the vineyards, the cherries the spring rewards, they are mine too, and I belong to them, like a black atom in the arid land, in the autumn light on the grapes, in this metallic homeland lifted by towers of snow. Bards of course, are the bearers of literary ambrosia, but it is not merely when they concern themselves with the heroic canon that poets have the power to grant immortality; they can take everyday experiences and imbue them with deep significance, distill the wistful and extract the poignant, transform the merely special to the truly magical and in so doing make our ordinary lives a little less so. It is said of Neruda that he caresses words, and that there is great beauty in his use of the language; and doubtless this must be true, but though the original poem in Spanish often appears along with the English translation here, for those of us who do not understand both languages, there is no way to really appreciate it. And not knowing just how much the spirit of the original is captured in the translation can be frustrating too; but this is not to take away from the quality of the translations - even in the English versions there is no denying the moments when the breath comes unstitched and the heart misses a beat. The oeuvre of the poet who was the 'voice of the voiceless' is immensely prolific, yet incredibly versatile and so defies easy analysis. It goes through the entire spectrum- passionate, sad, tender, political, ornate, erotic, whimsical - witness the 'Ode to the Artichoke'- and at times dull and prosaic, but it is always original, and there are gems to be found even in his lesser known works. There is something charming about his politically motivated poetry too; quaint the anti-capitalistic tirades, Nixon-bashing and the Marxist espousal may seem now, but there is no mistaking the emotional intensity, the earnestness of feeling, the conviction of belief and the love of the utopian ideal that underlies it. This is a good book to pick up on a lazy afternoon and dip into at random, and I intend to revisit it again -and often, in the future; yo volveré - as the poet says.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Jack C. Buck

    a 1000 pager. Took me a year of it sitting bedside.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Jessaka

    I have written poetry off and on all my life but so few poems have I kept. I am not a lover of poetry, nor do I really understand most of it. I came up on this book at a bookstore and found that I couldn't put it down. I would begin to walk out of the store, just to find myself back with this book, over and over again, so I had to own it. It inspires me when I need inspiration to write, but I don't consider myself a poet. It is obvious why he is so well loved as a poet.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Katie Joiner

    Three words: Neruda. Is. Amazing. He is the best poet-or was, I guess-that this world has seen to date. He's become my new favorite! My family makes fun of me beacause I have something akin to a crush on him, but, hey, a girl can dream! His poetry is beautiful, captivating. I read a few every night before I go to bed, and it was perfect. I got sucked in. Okay, so you know how when you write something, or you read something, and there's this line that makes you go, "whoa" ? Usually it's the first Three words: Neruda. Is. Amazing. He is the best poet-or was, I guess-that this world has seen to date. He's become my new favorite! My family makes fun of me beacause I have something akin to a crush on him, but, hey, a girl can dream! His poetry is beautiful, captivating. I read a few every night before I go to bed, and it was perfect. I got sucked in. Okay, so you know how when you write something, or you read something, and there's this line that makes you go, "whoa" ? Usually it's the first or last line. With Neruda, every other line is a holy-shiz-that's-the-perfect-way-to-say-that line. A why-didn't-i-think-of-putting-it-that-way stanza. A mesmerizing look inside the mind of a man who is a genius with words, but who is purely human with more insight than most upon the fact that he is human. If you go through life without reading one of Neruda's "Odes to..." I feel sorry for you. Go. Offline. Read. Please. You won't regret it!

  18. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer

    This book was a gift from Jared, who quoted this from it in his inscription: "I will bring you happy flowers from the mountains, bluebells, dark hazels, and rustic baskets of kisses. I want to do with you what spring does with the cherry trees."

  19. 4 out of 5

    Lena

    A friend of mine composes songs on piano with Pablo Neruda's poems as lyrics and listening to his songs I became intrigued with Pablo Neruda. I'm yet to read more of his work but the little I have read (and heard) has been promising.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Embracing My Books

    You can read my review here: http://embracingmybooks.blogspot.be/2...

  21. 4 out of 5

    T.M. Lakomy

    they dont make men like Neruda anymore

  22. 5 out of 5

    Ashley Warren

    Beautiful, hits me in places where few poets have managed to reach.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Gloria Sun

    whew, i feel like i just finished an encyclopedia. this man is so human i think he feels more than i do, or at least he's better at putting it in words than i am, so that i become more sensitive to my condition. he's also incredibly versatile and talks about things from love to the history of the spanish conquest to nixon and watermelons. i also didn't know i had the ability to continuously read such a thick compilation of poetry - normally it's in smaller bursts, but now i have more confidence whew, i feel like i just finished an encyclopedia. this man is so human i think he feels more than i do, or at least he's better at putting it in words than i am, so that i become more sensitive to my condition. he's also incredibly versatile and talks about things from love to the history of the spanish conquest to nixon and watermelons. i also didn't know i had the ability to continuously read such a thick compilation of poetry - normally it's in smaller bursts, but now i have more confidence to do the same to other poets that i've had a taste of. wouldn't read again simply because there's no time, but it would be a treat to open up to a random page once in a while and take in what's there. i'm glad i own this.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Sharaf Jaber

    Very inspiring, soul touching and soul shattering in the same time, Dark with a bitter sweet narration

  25. 5 out of 5

    Kari Ni

    Deep and magical, Neruda's poems create a whole new world of love, undisclosed desires, longing and melancholy, which will start lingering in your mind and soul the moment you read them.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Michelle Marcano

    Pablo Neruda is a Spanish poet. I came across one of his poems on pintrest and since then have been absolutely obsessed with it. I have read it in Spanish and in English and it translate beautifully in Spanish. I have attached the poem below. The use of repetition in this poem really adds to the emotions behind it. It has such great details that describ the main idea of the poem. I really think that this poem was written to describe that the best kind of love is that love that one can't explain Pablo Neruda is a Spanish poet. I came across one of his poems on pintrest and since then have been absolutely obsessed with it. I have read it in Spanish and in English and it translate beautifully in Spanish. I have attached the poem below. The use of repetition in this poem really adds to the emotions behind it. It has such great details that describ the main idea of the poem. I really think that this poem was written to describe that the best kind of love is that love that one can't explain or describe where it comes from. The use of repetition on the poem really help the readers understand the poem. I think that very often poems are so complex that it is sometimes hard to understand, but Neruda's poem uses so much repetition that it is easy to understand exactly what the poem is about. I also really love how he starts his poem by using the words "I do not love you" I think that this part sets the flow of the poem because by reading those words we think the poem will be about something completely different than what it was. In every stanza of the poem Neruda uses repetition to emphasize on how much he loves this person. I also really enjoyed the similes and metaphors he uses in order to make the poem interesting. I would love to use poetry with repetition and metaphors in my classroom. I think that poetry is hard for children to understand and therefore is something that they don't like to do. I think that by showing children that poetry is simply about writing what they truly feel using great details I will be able to have a classroom full of poets. Sonnet XVII I do not love you as if you were salt-rose, or topaz, or the arrow of carnations the fire shoots off. I love you as certain dark things are to be loved, in secret, between the shadow and the soul. I love you as the plant that never blooms but carries in itself the light of hidden flowers; thanks to your love a certain solid fragrance, risen from the earth, lives darkly in my body. I love you without knowing how, or when, or from where. I love you straightforwardly, without complexities or pride; so I love you because I know no other way than this: where I does not exist, nor you, so close that your hand on my chest is my hand, so close that your eyes close as I fall asleep.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Ria Alexandra

    While a beautiful anthology, I was very disappointed to find that it is not a complete bilingual edition. There is a sampling of *some* of the original poems in Spanish, but if you are looking for a side-by-side reading this is not it. In all fairness, Ilan Stavans presents a formidable compilation of Neruda's poems, and several translations of one poem are included for comparison (demonstrating the art of translation), but if you are looking for Neruda's poems in the original Spanish look elsew While a beautiful anthology, I was very disappointed to find that it is not a complete bilingual edition. There is a sampling of *some* of the original poems in Spanish, but if you are looking for a side-by-side reading this is not it. In all fairness, Ilan Stavans presents a formidable compilation of Neruda's poems, and several translations of one poem are included for comparison (demonstrating the art of translation), but if you are looking for Neruda's poems in the original Spanish look elsewhere.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Pollopicu

    I hate that I have to write that Neruda's poetry didn't move me as much as I thought it would. His poetry is very similar to that of Walt Whitman, who I also didn't particularly enjoy. I've read so many references to the beauty of Neruda's poetry, I just thought they would be painfully and beautifully romantic, but they were just regular poems. I did however enjoy a couple, but my favorite in this mammoth collection of poetry is one by the title of "Your Laughter".

  29. 4 out of 5

    Robyn

    I'm a fan since Spanish classes (major) in college. Spanish speaking authors/writers use imagery that we do not use in English, in poetry and in speaking. It's beautiful, illustrative, thoughtful, provocative, and so full; it's hard to explain unless you read and understand the language, but I love it!

  30. 4 out of 5

    Kristine Novero

    Good poetry is a culmination of eloquence, sensibility and vision. Pablo Neruda exemplifies these, and more. His words ignite a sea of imagination, bringing forth a daydreaming frenzy while still enabling me to bask in reality. He wouldn't have a Nobel Prize in Literature back in 1971 for nothing.

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